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FEATURED NEWS STORY

Influential UO Anthropology Professor Dies

Philip D. Young, 76, died June 30, 2013 in Cottage Grove, Oregon. He was born in Chicago, Illinois on October 18, 1936 to Donald and Jean (Ftacek) Young. He served in the Army in The Panama Canal Zone. Phil was Professor Emeritus in Anthropology at the University of Oregon, Chair of the Department of Anthropology (1985-1989) and Director of International Studies (1992-1995). He authored and co-edited 6 books and wrote numerous scholarly articles published in English and Spanish. He continued to be deeply committed to his work until his recent passing. He was a noted cultural anthropologist, a Latin Americanist specializing in socioeconomic change, adaptation among small farmers, and language and culture relationships. He had over 40 years of experience as a researcher, teacher, consultant, field-training director, project evaluator, and administrator. His bond with Ngäbe friends and family always drew him back to Panama. He leaves a legacy in his scholarship, his students and colleagues and the many people he touched throughout the world. To those close to him, Phil will be remembered for his wit and sense of humor, his devilish smile, and his collection of artisan frogs. His wife, Kathleen Black, will scatter his ashes at the Oregon coast, where they spent many happy times together. He is survived by Kathy, sons John and Andy, daughters Aixa, Juanita, Tanya, grandchildren and great-grandchildren all of Eugene, and brother Jerry Young, who lives in California.

Published in Eugene Register-Guard on July 14, 2013
To learn more, click here

Congratulations to Professors Biersack and Stephen!

Congratulations to Drs. Aletta Biersack and Lynn Stephen, who received the CSWS Faculty Grant Awards. Dr. Aletta Biersack received the award for her project titled “Gendered Transformations in the Ipili Mining Era,” and Dr. Lynn Stephen received the award for her project titled, “Tristeza/Alegria: Gender and Citizen Children of Undocumented Parents, Cinthya’s Story.” Congratulations again!

Congratulations to Recipients of the 2014 Faculty Research Awards

Congratulations to Drs. Aletta Biersack and Carol Silverman who are the recipients of the 2014 Faculty Research Award to support their research. Professor Biersack recieved the award for her research on “Mining Among Ipili Speakers:  An Ethnography of Global Connection.” Professor Carol Silverman received the award for her research “Global Gypsy:  Balkan Romani World Music.” Congratulations again!

Postdoctoral Fellows Program

Anthropology postdoctoral Fellows program and online class development

The Department of Anthropology recognizes the current challenges of the academic and non-academic job markets. The department wishes to support our graduate students in making a productive transition out of our PhD program and into their chosen field. The department, therefore, may provide up to 2 years of post-PhD support in the form of a Postdoctoral Fellow to selected recently graduated UO Anthropology PhD without immediate employment elsewhere. These positions are available when feasible within the constraints of the department budget and are negotiated with the Head on a case-by-case basis. Each Postdoctoral Fellow will work closely with a tenure related faculty supervisor. The Postdoctoral Fellow position includes a 0.5 FTE Adjunct position with a 4 course load plus a commitment from the fellow to develop an existing class to an online format. As the goal of these positions are to provide a “stepping stone” to the next stage of the Postdoctoral Fellow’s career, these positions are not career NTTF positions and are expected to last for up to 2 years.

Expectations: The Postdoctoral Fellowship provides an opportunity to develop and enhance skills and experience required to be competitive on the job market by taking advantage of faculty and university resources. Expectations of the fellowship include teaching four courses as described below, presenting research at conferences, submitting and/or publishing papers in high quality journals, edited volumes, and/or monographs in the fellow’s area(s) of study, and submitting grant proposals as appropriate for sub-field. Renewal of the postdoctoral fellowship after completion of the first year is dependent on the level of progress made in these areas and is subject to review by the Executive Committee with input from the supervising faculty member(s).

Postdoctoral fellow Supervisor: The goal of Anthropology’s Postdoctoral Fellow program is to provide support, mentorship, and aid to the Fellow’s career development. The supervisor is therefore encouraged to be a different faculty member from the Fellow’s doctoral advisor to aid in research growth and development beyond the PhD if appropriate but can also be the dissertation advisor if appropriate. The supervisor meets regularly with the Postdoctoral Fellow to discuss and possibly collaborate on new directions in the Fellow’s research. Fellows may also work directly with a faculty member if they wish to learn new skills from that faculty member. Supervisor / Fellow arrangements are made by agreement between both parties and the Head.

Adjunct teaching: A postdoctoral fellow position comes with a 4 course load 0.5 FTE adjunct position in the department. The courses taught by the Postdoctoral Fellow may occur in any of the four terms (Fall, Winter, Spring, or Summer) and include either on campus classes or online classes but must be taught according to the requirements for a 0.5 FTE contract. On campus classes will typically be funded as course buyouts or be replacements from service releases. The Postdoctoral Fellow will also be expected (but not required) to develop an online version of at least one class. Online classes need to be existing and regularized Anthropology classes and the online version must be equivalent to the on campus version and within the Fellow’s expertise. Expertise is determined from prior teaching or GTF experience as well as Anthropology core faculty feedback. The DUS will be responsible for consulting with the appropriate subfield(s) on class selection. Assignment of particular classes will then be made by the Head in consultation with the Executive Committee.

Budgetary considerations: Each potential position is contingent of availability of departmental funds. Funding for these Postdoctoral Fellow positions comes from departmental funds available for hiring adjuncts and consequently fluctuates with such factors as leave savings, buyout funds, and returns from summer session and online classes. Where possible and appropriate given the proposed Fellow’s expertise and experience, and in consultation with the faculty receiving the buyout, course buyouts will be first offered to Postdoctoral Fellows. Returns from online and summer session classes taught by the Fellow will be used to contribute directly to funding their salary for those courses of their position.

Other funding using course buyouts will be used as available and when it is possible for the Fellow to teach the same or an appropriate agreed upon replacement.

U of O faculty and graduate students will be presenting their research at the 2013 AAA conference in Chicago (November 20-24)

Among those presenting are Drs. Lynn Stephen, Sandra Morgen, Carol Silverman, Kristin Yarris, Geraldine Moreno, and Aletta Biersack, as well as graduate students Samantha King and Angela Montague

Graduate student Samantha King was accepted to participate in the Society for Cultural Anthropology’s Faculty–Student Workshop luncheons at the American Anthropological Association’s annual meeting in Chicago.

Samantha will participate in the workshop “The Anthropology of Becoming” and will also present her paper “Gender, Food Security, and Alternative Economic Networks in the Commonwealth of Dominica, Eastern Caribbean” as part of the Society for Economic Anthropology’s panel on New and Emerging Markets, Social Relations, and Inequality.

Focus Areas and Subdisciplines

Focus Areas and Subdisciplines

The UO Department of Anthropology is dedicated to better understanding human cultural and biological origins and diversity through education and research. The faculty is committed to excellence in teaching and to the advancement of knowledge through local, national, and international programs of research.

The Department is composed of three subfields: Archaeology, Biological Anthropology, and Sociocultural Anthropology. While each subfield focuses on a different aspect of the study of humans, numerous links and shared perspectives in teaching and research exist among them. The UO Department of Anthropology is distinctive in its integration of the anthropological subfields via five areas of expertise and focus:

  • Evolution, Ecology, and Environment examines the adaptation of human and non-human primates with their ecosystems. As evolutionary anthropologists, we study these interactions through research on behavior and cognition, diet, foraging strategies, life history patterns, and morphological variation of past and present populations.
  • Indigenous and Minoritized Groups encompasses issues facing indigenous and minoritized groups such as globalization, health care, school curricula, and management of archaeological sites and cultural heritage. We foster indigenous scholarship (both undergraduate and graduate), and promote collaborative relationships such as those between the academy and tribal and local community stakeholders.
  • Food, Health, and Society examines the effects of economic and cultural factors on diet, health, and subsistence in modern and prehistoric contexts. Our studies of health range broadly from nutritional anthropology and social construction of health and illness to evolutionary medicine.
  • Identity, Heritage, and Globalization encompasses the politics of culture, nationalism and transnationalism, folklore, tourism, and popular culture, performance and political economic change both in the modern world and historically. We investigate the different dimensions of identity including gender, race and ethnicity in a variety of contexts such as international development and political organizations, festivals, rituals, museums and state and local governments. We examine cultural heritage and cultural resource management as well as globalization and culture contact in both pre-historic and contemporary contexts such as migration and displacement.
  • Sex, Gender, and Sexuality examines the evolutionary dimensions of sex and sexuality; variations in constructions of sex, gender, sexuality, and the body; intersections of systems of sexuality and gender with other systems of inequality such as class, race, ethnicity and political economy through the lens of social movements and popular culture; and kinship systems, broadly construed, as these relate to gender and sexuality regimes, through time and across cultures.

Focus Areas and Subdisciplines

Focus Areas and Subdisciplines

The UO Department of Anthropology is dedicated to better understanding human cultural and biological origins and diversity through education and research. The faculty is committed to excellence in teaching and to the advancement of knowledge through local, national, and international programs of research.

The Department is composed of three subfields: Archaeology, Biological Anthropology, and Sociocultural Anthropology. While each subfield focuses on a different aspect of the study of humans, numerous links and shared perspectives in teaching and research exist among them. The UO Department of Anthropology is distinctive in its integration of the anthropological subfields via five areas of expertise and focus:

  • Evolution, Ecology, and Environment examines the adaptation of human and non-human primates with their ecosystems. As evolutionary anthropologists, we study these interactions through research on behavior and cognition, diet, foraging strategies, life history patterns, and morphological variation of past and present populations.
  • Indigenous and Minoritized Groups encompasses issues facing indigenous and minoritized groups such as globalization, health care, school curricula, and management of archaeological sites and cultural heritage. We foster indigenous scholarship (both undergraduate and graduate), and promote collaborative relationships such as those between the academy and tribal and local community stakeholders.
  • Food, Health, and Society examines the effects of economic and cultural factors on diet, health, and subsistence in modern and prehistoric contexts. Our studies of health range broadly from nutritional anthropology and social construction of health and illness to evolutionary medicine.
  • Identity, Heritage, and Globalization encompasses the politics of culture, nationalism and transnationalism, folklore, tourism, and popular culture, performance and political economic change both in the modern world and historically. We investigate the different dimensions of identity including gender, race and ethnicity in a variety of contexts such as international development and political organizations, festivals, rituals, museums and state and local governments. We examine cultural heritage and cultural resource management as well as globalization and culture contact in both pre-historic and contemporary contexts such as migration and displacement.
  • Sex, Gender, and Sexuality examines the evolutionary dimensions of sex and sexuality; variations in constructions of sex, gender, sexuality, and the body; intersections of systems of sexuality and gender with other systems of inequality such as class, race, ethnicity and political economy through the lens of social movements and popular culture; and kinship systems, broadly construed, as these relate to gender and sexuality regimes, through time and across cultures.

Information for Prospective Graduate Students

Dear prospective graduate student,

Welcome! Thank you for interest in our program. The Department of Anthropology typically admits 6-9 graduate students annually. Admission is offered only for the Fall term except under highly unusual circumstances. This website will help make the experience of applying to our program more accessible by providing information about the Department of Anthropology’s admissions process and advice for successful applications.

If you are considering the Department of Anthropology at the University of Oregon, we strongly recommend you first consider how your research interests fit with the research interests of our department.

Identify a Subdiscipline: Each prospective graduate student should select an anthropological subdiscipline (Archaeology, Cultural Anthropology, Biological Anthropology).  Although a core subdiscipline needs to be identified for your application, we recognize that anthropological work today is highly interdisciplinary and an interest in more than one subdiscipline is encouraged and supported.  If your research interest is truly interdisciplinary (e.g., Biocultural Anthropology), please use your personal statement to discuss this. A list of the subdisciplines can be found here: http://pages.uoregon.edu/anthro/academics/subdisciplines/.

Identify an Area of Interest: Regardless of the subdiscipline, our department’s faculty and students work on innovative and interconnected areas of research.  Each prospective student should consider how their own research interests overlap with our department’s focus areas. A list of these areas and their content can be found here: http://pages.uoregon.edu/anthro/academics/focus-areas/.

Identify a Faculty Advisor: Like subdisciplines and areas of expertise, prospective graduate students should identify a primary and secondary advisor. Please contact individual faculty members with whom you are interested in working with before applying to the program in order to determine if they are currently accepting students and to discuss your shared interests. The dialog between you and your potential advisor is very important. In the spirit of interdisciplinarity, it is possible to choose a primary and secondary advisor from two different subdisciplines.  Faculty interests and contact information is available here: http://pages.uoregon.edu/anthro/people/faculty/core-faculty/.

Once you have determined that the University of Oregon is the best fit for you and you have made contact with a potential advisor, you can begin preparing your application. The application deadline for the 2014-15 year is 5pm on Sunday, December 15, 2013. Information about the application process can be found under Admissions Procedure and via the Graduate School. Make sure you carefully observe all deadlines and instructions. Please note that your personal statement is very important and should focus on the following information: theoretical interests, relevant classes and/or research experience, and reasons why the Anthropology program at the University of Oregon is the program best suited for your research aims. Be specific! Use your statement to help us picture you in our department.

The Department of Anthropology at the University of Oregon is committed to maintaining a diverse and inclusive graduate student body.  Preview Oregon is a program devoted to recruiting students underrepresented in our department.  For the purposes of the Preview Oregon program we consider underrepresented to include members of underrepresented racial and ethnic categories, first generation college students, students from low-income households, and disabled students.  Preview Oregon will be held on October 18th and is a great way to learn more about our department by visiting our campus. During this visit you will receive a tour of the campus and Eugene, learn more about on-campus resources, attend a departmental seminar, and meet and talk with faculty and current graduate students in both formal and informal settings.  Invitation to participate in Preview Oregon is by application. If you are interested in learning more about this program please visit our Preview Oregon website. Please note that applications for Preview Oregon are due by September 20th.

Thank you! We look forward to hearing from you soon.


Need more info?

Please do not hesitate to contact the department, faculty, and admissions officers for more information on the program and the admissions procedure.

For more general information about our graduate program, please see the Graduate Program site.

General questions about the graduate program should be sent to the Director of Graduate Studies, a faculty member who chairs the Graduate Admissions Committee. For 2013-2014, the Director of Graduate Studies is Dr. Stephen Frost (sfrost@uoregon.edu).

For more information about the Museum Studies Certificate see the certificate website or contact Anthropology certificate liason Dr. Daphne Gallagher (daphne@uoregon.edu).

Questions about the application process should be directed to the Graduate Coordinator, an office staff member who works closely with the Graduate Admissions Committee and is responsible for overseeing the graduate application process. The Graduate Coordinator is Betina Lynn (betina@uoregon.edu).

Additional information on graduate studies at UO is available from the Graduate School.

Preview Oregon

Information about Preview Oregon

What is Preview Oregon?

The Department of Anthropology at the University of Oregon is committed to maintaining a diverse and inclusive graduate student body.  Preview Oregon is a program devoted to recruiting students underrepresented in our department.  For the purposes of the Preview Oregon program we consider underrepresented to include members of underrepresented racial and ethnic categories, first generation college students, students from low-income households, and disabled students.  Preview Oregon will be held on October 18th and is a great way to learn more about our department by visiting our campus. During this visit you will receive a tour of the campus and Eugene, learn more about on-campus resources, attend a departmental seminar, and meet and talk with faculty and current graduate students in both formal and informal settings.  We will provide transportation to and from Eugene, lodging while here and cover meals. For students coming from a distance, this is likely to occupy a three day period from October 17-19. This is a competitive process, space is limited.

How do I apply?

Invitation to participate in Preview Oregon is by application and is intended only for students who self-identify as one of the under-represented categories listed above. Applicants should provide the following:

  1. completed Application Form including contact information for 2 faculty members at your undergraduate or Master’s degree institution who can provide a reference for you
  2. One page statement of interest
  3. unofficial transcript

* Complete the form using Adobe Acrobat Pro or Reader; or you can print it, fill it out by hand and scan it to a PDF.

What information should be included in my statement of interest?

Your statement is really important. Please use this statement to introduce yourself and explain why (given your research interests) the Department of Anthropology at the University of Oregon is a great fit for you. You should also discuss how as an underrepresented student the Preview Oregon program would benefit you and what you hope to get out of the experience.

How do I submit my application materials?

All materials should be emailed to Dr. Stephen Frost (sfrost@uoregon.edu).

When are applications due?

All application materials for Preview Oregon are due by September 20th.

Does participation in Preview Oregon guarantee I will be accepted into your program?

No, participation in Preview Oregon is not part of the official graduate school application process. Preview Oregon is designed to help prospective students learn more about our program before they apply and is a great way to make a connection with the faculty member you hope to work with.

How can I get more information?

If you are interested in learning more about this program please contact Dr. Stephen Frost (sfrost@uoregon.edu).

We look forward to hearing from you!

Graduate Admissions Procedure

Graduate Admissions Procedure

Once you have read the Information for Prospective Graduate Students, determined that the University of Oregon is the best fit for you, and made contact with a potential advisor, you can begin preparing your application. The following information will help you start this process.

DEADLINE: The application deadline for the 2014-15 year is 5pm on Sunday, December 15, 2013.

In order to apply to the graduate program, please complete the following two steps. Additionally, International students must fill out the International Financial Statement (see below). Please follow instructions carefully. When indicating area of interest, please use the subfield designations of Archaeology, Biological or Cultural, NOT our areas of excellence. This will facilitate assigning each application to the appropriate review committee.

1) Complete the University of Oregon’s Online Application from the Graduate School. The Department of Anthropology will automatically receive a copy of your online application. The following documents must be uploaded (in PDF form) onto the Online Application System:

A Statement of Purpose that describes in detail your interests in the field of anthropology and your career plans. Please limit the length of this document to a maximum of 5 single-spaced pages, but shorter statements are preferred. This statement should describe your research interests, professional goals, how these integrate with our department, and why you wish to be admitted to our program. Be sure to indicate the faculty member (or members) and the resources and aspects of the program that seem particularly suited to your educational needs. This statement will be read closely.

A Writing Sample. Provide one sample of your written work. The sample should indicate your potential as a graduate student and anthropologist, so choose carefully. Term papers, papers given at professional meetings, and papers submitted for publication are common choices.

Three (3) Letters of Recommendation from former professors or similar professionals who are in a position to evaluate your potential for successful completion of a graduate degree in anthropology. The Online Application System will guide you through the process. For tips on requesting letters of recommendation, please visit this link to one of our faculty websites:

http://pages.uoregon.edu/mmoss/ref-let.htm.

2) Forward the following official documents as detailed below:

Two Official Copies of Academic Transcripts from the institution(s) granting your degree(s), one sent to the Department of Anthropology and the other sent to the Office of Admissions. One official copy of transcripts from all other schools attended is also required by the Department of Anthropology.

Your Official Score Report Results from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). GRE scores are required for admissions consideration. You should take the exam no later than summer term, since 5-8 weeks is required to process the results, and the scores must reach the department by the application deadline. The codes you need when taking the exam to ensure your scores are delivered to the right institution are: School, 4846; Department, 1701.

These documents should be sent to:

Graduate Coordinator
Department of Anthropology
1218 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403-1218

If you have questions about the application process, contact Graduate Coordinator Betina Lynn (betina@uoregon.edu).

Special Requirements for International Students

International students must also fill out the International Financial Statement. Click here for a PDF version of this form. This needs to be submitted to the University of Oregon Office of Admissions at 1217 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR  97403-1217.

Departmental Support for Graduate Students

All applicants to the Graduate Program in Anthropology are automatically considered for Graduate Teaching Fellowships. These fellowships come with a full tuition waiver, health insurance, and a modest monthly stipend. Additional information on Graduate Teaching Fellowships can be found in the Graduate Student Handbook.

Important Things to Keep in Mind During the Application Process

  1. Please make sure your name (including name changes) appears on everything you submit so we can match up records accurately.
  2. Incomplete applications will not be reviewed.
  3. The Department of Anthropology does not accept responsibility for postal or courier service delays for those materials submitted via standard mail.