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ANTHROPOLOGISTS AT THE MUSEUM OF NATURAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY

Museum of Natural and Cultural History Website


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Tom Connolly
MNCH Director of Archaeological Research

Education: B.S., Minnesota State University, Moorhead (1977); M.S., Oregon (1982); Ph.D., Oregon (1986)
Areas of Interest: Dr. Connolly has been director of archaeological research at the UOMNCH since 1986. He has done fieldwork on the northern US prairie/plains (Minnesota/North Dakota), in Scotland, and primarily in the Pacific Northwest. Connolly’s Northwest research spans varied geographies, including the Pacific coast, the western interior valleys, the Columbia Plateau, and the Great Basin high desert. Topical research interests include hunter-gatherer-fisher societies and incipient agriculture, lithic studies, geoarchaeology, cultural resource management, fiber artifacts and basketry, and historical archaeology. Connolly has worked extensively with archaeological museum collections, particularly ancient basketry and sandals from Oregon caves and rockshelters. Connolly’s publications include books and book-length monographs, book chapters, and journal articles in American Antiquity, Quaternary Research, Radiocarbon, Historical Archaeology, the Journal of California and Great Basin Anthropology, the Journal of Archaeological Science, the Journal of Anthropological Research, the Journal of Northwest Anthropology, the University of Utah Anthropological Papers, and the University of Oregon Anthropological Papers series.
Curriculum Vitae
Office Location: Museum of Natural and Cultural History Archaeology Lab Building 116
Office Phone: (541) 346-3031
E-mail: connolly@uoregon.edu

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Jon Erlandson
MNCH Director; Professor

Education: B.A., UC Santa Barbara (1980); M.A., UC Santa Barbara (1983); Ph.D., UC Santa Barbara (1988)
Dr. Erlandson has been a professor at UO since 1990. An archaeologist who has done fieldwork in California, Oregon, Alaska, and Iceland, Erlandson has written or edited 16 books and published over 200 scholarly articles. Research and teaching interests include the development of maritime societies, historical ecology in coastal environments, human evolution and migrations, the peopling of the Americas, the history of seafaring, traditional technologies, dating methods in archaeology, geoarchaeology, cultural resource management, and collaborative research with indigenous communities. Since 2005, Erlandson has directed the Museum of Natural and Cultural History and the Oregon State Museum of Anthropology at the UO. He is also a co-editor of the Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology.
Curriculum Vitae
Office Location: Museum of Natural and Cultural History
Office Phone: (541) 346-5115
Lab Location: Coastal Archaeology and Human Ecology Laboratory, Building 112
Lab Phone: (541) 346-0662
E-mail: jerland@uoregon.edu

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Dennis Jenkins
MNCH Senior Research Associate

Education: B.A., Nevada (1977); M.A., Nevada (1971); Ph.D., Oregon (1991)
Areas of Interest: Dennis Jenkins specializes in prehistoric archaeology of the Great Basin, having worked closely with Drs. Claude Warren (Mojave Desert), Margaret Lyneis (Anasazi), and C. Melvin Aikens (Northern Great Basin). He served as the Fort Irwin Archaeological Project Field Director in Barstow, California between 1981 and 1985. He came to came to the UO to pursue a doctorate degree under the direction of professor Aikens in 1985 and received his PhD in 1991. Dennis is a Senior Research Archaeologist for the Museum of Natural and Cultural History. He has taught and directed the UO’s Northern Great Basin archaeological field school since 1989. His research focuses on the first colonization of the Americas, obsidian sourcing and hydration, prehistoric shell bead trade, and settlement-subsistence patterns of the Northern Great Basin. He has conducted more than 100 site investigations throughout his career, publishing 7 books, 33 chapters, articles and reviews, >30 reports and contributions to reports, and given >50 papers at professional meetings. He directs the Paisley Caves Archaeological Research Project in central Oregon where the UO field school recovered the oldest human remains (14,000 year old DNA in coprolites) in North America. He has co-authored 3 articles in Science and his work has been profiled in more than 50 newspaper and magazine articles. He has appeared in 8 television documentaries, filming for History Channel, National Geographic, Oregon Public Broadcasting, and Canadian Broad Casting. Financial, professional, and material support for his research has been provided by the National Science Foundation, University of Oregon, Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Sundance Archaeological Research Fund, University of Nevada, Reno, Keystone Research Fund, Oregon State University, Bureau of Land Management, and private donations.
Curriculum vitae
Office Location: 1511 Moss St. (The White House)
Office Phone: (541) 346-3026; Cell: (541) 514-1228
E-mail: djenkins@uoregon.edu

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Pat O’Grady
MNCH Staff Archaeologist

Education: University of Oregon B.S. (1996), M.S. (1999), and Ph.D. (2006)
Areas of Interest: O’Grady is a staff archaeologist at the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History. He was an archaeologist for the Oregon Department of Transportation from 2002–2005, and has also worked for the Burns District Bureau of Land Management. He has served on fourteen University of Oregon field schools since 1994, first as a student, then as assistant, supervisor, and instructor. His field school operations are currently focused on Clovis sites in southeastern Oregon, including Sheep Mountain and Sage Hen Gap. Primary research interests include hunter-gatherer subsistence practices, late Pleistocene – early Holocene cultural transitions in the Great Basin of western North America, zooarchaeology, mobility patterns, and remote sensing applications, particularly ground penetrating radar. His Master’s research “Human Occupation Patterns in the Uplands: An Analysis of Sourced Obsidian Projectile Points from Playa Villages in the Fort Rock Uplands, Lake County, Oregon” was an exploration of highland village settlement and mobility patterns in the uplands between the Fort Rock and Summer Lake basins in south-central Oregon. His Ph.D. research “Before Winter Comes: Archaeological Investigations of Settlement and Subsistence in Harney Valley, Harney County, Oregon” is an examination of mid to late Holocene multi-elevation land use patterns encompassing wetland to upland settings.
Curriculum Vitae
Office Phone: (503) 346-0671
E-mail: pogrady@uoregon.edu
UO Archaeological Field School Website

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Brian O’Neill
MNCH Senior Research Associate and Staff Archaeologist

Education: B.S., Kansas State University (1972); M.A., Kansas State University (1978); Ph.D., University of Oregon (1989).
Areas of Interest: Dr. O’Neill is an archaeologist who has been with the Museum since 1989. He has done field work in Missouri and Kansas, and in the Pacific Northwest in Washington and Oregon. He has directed archaeological research throughout Oregon, but the focus of his work has been the interior valleys of the Willamette, Umpqua, and Rogue River drainages. He is particularly interested in documenting the early Holocene (pre-Mazama) in the western Cascades. Research interests include complex hunter-gatherer-fisher societies, obsidian studies, residue analysis, and the use of GIS in CRM and predictive modeling. O’Neill has authored and edited volumes in the University of Oregon Anthropological Papers, the Bureau of Land Management Cultural Resource Series, and has contributed articles to the Association of Oregon Archaeologists Occasional Papers Series. He has also written on Native rock art in Kansas.
Curriculum Vitae
Office Location: Museum of Natural and Cultural History Archaeology Lab Building 107
Office Phone: (541) 346-3033
E-mail: boneill@uoregon.edu

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