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AFFILIATED FACULTY, POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWS,
AND COURTESY RESEARCH ASSOCIATES


Kelly Cannon-Miller
Courtesy Research Associate

E-mail: Kelly@deschuteshistory.org

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Ian B. Edwardsedwards 150x150
Adjunct Instructor

Education: B.A., Anthropology, Plymouth State College (1996); M.A., Oregon State University (2003); Ph.D., University of Oregon (2012)
Areas of Interest: I am a cultural anthropologist who specializes in exploring and understanding human-environmental interactions. Specifically, my research focuses on the relationships between local communities and their wildlife resources in Mali, West Africa. The purpose of my research is not only to expand on disciplinary understandings of the processes of globalization, but also to provide ethnographic insight to assist in the development of resilient and sustainable wildlife management programs that are attentive to local wants and needs. My other areas of interest include: political ecology, international conservation & development, colonialism & postcolonialism, economics, traditional medicine, and ethnography.
Email: iedwards@uoregon.edu

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Emily Guthrie
Adjunct Instructor & Courtesy Research Associate

Education:
Areas of Interest:
Curriculum Vitae
Office Location:
Email:

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Darcy Hannibal
Adjunct Instructor & Courtesy Research Associate

Areas of Interest: Dr. Hannibal is broadly trained in behavior and ecology, with research interests in primatology as a comparative framework for understanding human evolution. Her research interests within primatology focus on behavioral and morphological adaptations associated with dietary strategies. Her dissertation research investigated the relationships between feeding competition, access to food resources, cheek pouch use and female reproductive success among the rhesus macaques of Cayo Santiago. Dr. Hannibal is currently collaborating with Dr. White on a metadata project investigating group size trends among primates. They are also planning a project on female affiliation and feeding competition among Japanese macaques.
E-mail: dlhannnibal@ucdavis.edu

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Amy Harper
Courtesy Research Associate

Amy Harper teaches in Bend. Her research interests are multicultural Europe, Muslim Europe, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality.
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Nicholas P. Jewnick jew
Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow

With an emphasis in archaeology, Dr. Jew is interested in prehistoric maritime adaptive technologies and the temporal and geographic distributions of resources in coastal and island societies. He has worked in Rapa Nui, California, Aleutian Islands, Oregon, Alaska, and his current research focuses on the California Channel Islands.
Email: njew@uoregon.edu
Office Location: Condon 355

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Eric Jones
Courtesy Research Associate

Areas of Interest: Environmental anthropology, political ecology theory, and contemporary gathering. Presently, he is a Senior Scientist at the Institute for Culture and Ecology in Portland, OR.

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David G. Lewis
Adjunct Instructor & Courtesy Research Associate

Education:
Areas of Interest:
Curriculum Vitae
Office Location:
Email:

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Sara Lewis
Visiting Professor

Education: B.A., St. Lawrence University (2003); A.M., University of Chicago (2005; 2007); Ph.D., Columbia University (2014)
Areas of Interest: medical and psychological anthropology; anthropology of religion; mental health; death and dying; Buddhims; Tibet, India and Nepal. Dr. Lewis is an anthropologist specializing in mental health, culture and religion with a geographic focus on Tibet and the Himalayas. Her recent project, “Spacious Minds, Empty Selves: Coping and Resilience in the Tibetan Exile Community,” draws on extended ethnographic research conducted in Dharamsala, India. The project investigates how the cultural architecture of time and memory shape processes of resilience among Tibetans exposed to political violence. In addition to her research activities, Sara has worked as a psychotherapist in community mental health in the areas of serious mental illness, mindfulness, and palliative care.

Office Location: Condon 356
Email: slewis8@uoregon.edu

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Nick Malonenick malone
Courtesy Research Associate

Education: B.A., University of Colorado (1997); M.S., Central Washington University (2001); Ph.D., University of Oregon (2007)
Areas of Interest: Hominoid evolution; nonhuman primate biology and socioecology; conservation; ecological communities; human relationships to nonhuman animals and the environment; Hylobatidae; Javan gibbons (Hylobates moloch); West Java, Indonesia; pygmy chimpanzees or bonobos (Pan paniscus); Democratic Republic of Congo.
E-mail: nmalone@uoregon.edu
Website: http://pages.uoregon.edu/nwpcs/Nicholas%20Malone.html

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Heather McClure
Courtesy Research Associate

Areas of Interest: Heather McClure is a Research Associate with the Oregon Social Learning Center’s Latino Research Team (LRT) and with the Anthropology Department at the University of Oregon (courtesy appointment). She received her doctorate from Northwestern University in 1999. For more than a decade she has been involved with community-based and policy research focused on health, human rights, and social networks in Guatemala and within Latino communities in the U.S. Her current work with the LRT focuses on behavioral, emotional, and physical health outcomes for Latino parents and youth in Oregon in two longitudinal studies (Charles Martinez, PI). Dr. McClure also investigates links among processes of adjustment to life in the U.S., discrimination, gender, and health, and she has led the team’s work to integrate stress biomarkers (e.g., cortisol and immunological markers), and anthropometric (e.g., height, weight) and health measures (e.g., blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol) into LRT research studies.
E-mail: hmcclure@uoregon.edu
Website: http://pages.uoregon.edu/anthro/mcclure/

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Marcela Mendoza
Adjunct Instructor & Courtesy Research Associate

Areas of Interest: Marcela Mendoza is a sociocultural anthropologist with expertise on hunter-gatherer societies of the South American Gran Chaco, and also Mexican immigration in the United States. Her book on Mexicanos in Oregon, co-authored with Erlinda Gonzales-Berry was published by Oregon State University Press in 2010. She serves as Executive Director of Centro LatinoAmericano in Eugene, Oregon.
E-mail: mmendoza@uoregon.edu, mmendoza@centrolatinoamericano.org

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Anne Mertl Millhollen
Courtesy Research Associate

Education:  B.A. and M.A.T., University of Chicago; Ph.D. University of Oregon
Areas of Interest: Anne Millhollen studied ringtailed lemur visual and olfactory communication as a graduate student at the Oregon National Primate Research Center. After discovering that lemurs could discriminate between the scents from different individuals, she went to Berenty Reserve, Madagascar, as a Duke University post-doctoral student. Anne found that both the ringtailed lemur and sifaka troops in Berenty’s rich gallery forest used scent marks to demarcate territorial boundaries. That research evolved into continuing studies about how food resources influence ringtailed lemur ranging, territorial behavior and population, how lemur foraging behavior affects the health of the forest, and how this interaction may determine the survival of gallery forest ecosystems in the south of Madagascar.
E-mail: hplam_1998@yahoo.com
Berenty Reserve website

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Angela Montague
Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow

Education:
Areas of Interest:
Curriculum Vitae
Office Location: Condon 356
Email: angelam@uoregon.edu

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Greg Nelson
Adjunct Instructor & Courtesy Research Associate

Education: B.A., UC Berkeley (1981); M.A., University of Montana (1989); Ph.D., University of Oregon (1998)
Areas of Interest: Dr. Nelson is an adjunct/courtesy assistant professor at UO. Greg C. Nelson studies dental anthropology, skeletal biology, and bioarchaeology.  Currently his research centers on prehistoric skeletal series from New Mexico and Palau. The New Mexico research involves material from the Pueblo III Gallina phase dating from 1100 to 1275 AD. Currently excavating the site of Cañada Simon I (with Tony Largaespada) his research focuses on questions surrounding Gallina origins and fate as well as their adaptation to fluctuating environments. Chelechol ra Orrak in the Republic of Palau is a cemetery site dating to approximately 3000 BP, one of the earliest in Oceania. Collaborating with Scott Fitzpatrick of North Carolina State University the research focuses on trying to determine the affinities of the earliest inhabitants of the archipelago and their relationship to other early peoples of Oceania. Other areas of major interest are paleoanthropology, evolutionary biology, and evolutionary theory.
Office Phone: (541) 206-7633
E-mail: gcnelson@uoregon.edu

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Chris O’Bryan
Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow

Education:
Areas of Interest:
Curriculum Vitae
Office Location: Condon 356
Email: cwobryan@uoregon.edu

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Robert Pastor
Adjunct Instructor & Courtesy Research Associate

Education: B.S., Biological Sciences, Northern Illinois University (1973); M.S., University of Oregon (1984); Ph.D., University of Oregon (1993)
Dr. Pastor currently holds an appointment as a Courtesy Research Associate in Anthropology. He conducts research in skeletal biology and helps teach human anatomy labs.
Academic Background:
In 8 ½ years (1998-2006) at the University of Bradford (UK), Dr. Pastor held the post of Lecturer in Biological and Forensic Anthropology at the Department of Archaeological Sciences. From 1993 to 1995, he held a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Physical Anthropology at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. Pastor has more than nine years experience in the field of forensic anthropology and an additional eight years of experience in osteology. Between 1995 and 1998, he worked for the United States Army Central Identification Laboratory-Hawaii (CILHI) on archaeological search and recovery, and the anthropological analysis, identification and repatriation of remains of military personnel from past conflicts in Southeast Asia, China, the Pacific and other international locations. Dr. Pastor has also worked for the United Nations (UN-ICTY) as a forensic anthropologist in Kosovo (2000), and routinely consulted for medico-legal agencies, pathologists, and police departments in the United Kingdom and occasionally abroad. He was one of two Specialty Assessors in forensic anthropology for the Council for the Registration of Forensic Practitioners (CRFP), and founding and council member for the British Association for Human Identification (BAHID). While in the UK, Dr. Pastor also held an appointment (2003-2006) on the Panel of Examiners for the Diploma in Forensic Human Identification, with The Society of Apothecaries of London.
Research Interests:
Dr. Pastor’s research interests in biological anthropology extend to the biocultural interface between nutritional anthropology and dental anthropology, especially to the application of dental microwear analyses to the reconstruction of prehistoric diets, with a focus on South Asian (Pakistani and India) and New World cemetery sites. His forensic anthropology research interests include: the development of new methods of morphometric and histological age estimation and sex determination; dental morphology and population variation; histological methods for distinguishing human and non-human fragmentary bone; antemortem and perimortem skeletal trauma in contemporary and archaeological populations; and taphonomy and preservation of the skeleton and soft tissue. He was awarded a Research Grant in 2003 from the British Academy to collect metric data on vertebral sexual dimorphism from several international documented skeletal collections. In addition, Dr. Pastor has been awarded a research grant from the University of Bradford Research Fund, and several Overseas Conference Travel Grants from The British Academy and The Royal Society.
Curriculum Vitae

E-mail: rfpastor@uoregon.edu

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Moshe Rapaport
Courtesy Research Associate

E-mail: rapaport@uoregon.edu

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Michelle Scalise Sugiyama
Courtesy Research Associate

Areas of Interest: Dr. Scalise Sugiyama received her PhD from UC Santa Barbara, where she combined literary study with training at the Center for Evolutionary Psychology. Her work examines narrative as behavior; she is particularly interested in why and when humans began telling and listening to stories. To this end, her work examines the oral traditions of small-scale societies against the exigencies of hunter-gatherer life. She has published numerous articles on the origin, function, and design of narrative, in both literary (e.g., Philosophy and Literature, Interdisciplinary Literary Studies Mosaic and social science (Human Nature, Evolution and Human Behavior) journals. Currently affiliated with the Institute for Cognitive and Decision Sciences and the Anthropology Department at the University of Oregon, Eugene, she teaches classes on the prehistory of narrative and art behavior.
E-mail: mscalise@uoregon.edu
Website: http://pages.uoregon.edu/mscalise/index.html

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Ann Simonds
Courtesy Research Associate

Education: Ph.D., UC Berkeley (1964)
Areas of Interest: Ann Simonds is currently working on the professional correspondence of Franz Boas for two projects: one on the development of his understanding of the social organization of the Kwakiutl, and the other on Boas’ 1895 work on myth and cultural interrelationships on the Northwest Coast.

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Kevin Turley

Courtesy Research Associate

Education: Ph.D., University of Oregon (2013)
Areas of Interest: I am a retired Professor of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery with a Medical Doctorate and a Ph.D. in Anthropology. I have long-term theoretical interests that cut across disciplines and involve the study of evolution, development, and morphology. My research has taken me to osteological and fossil collections in North America, Europe and Africa, and I have performed my analyses in the Department of Anthropology Morphometrics Laboratory.

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Larry Ulibarri
Adjunct Instructor & Courtesy Research Associate

Education:
Areas of Interest:
Curriculum Vitae
Office Location: Condon 355
Email: larryu@uoregon.edu

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Michel Waller
Adjunct Professor & Courtesy Research Associate

Education: Ph.D., University of Oregon (2011)
Areas of Interest: I study bonobo and chimpanzee socioecology and behavior in an effort to better understand the spectrum of factors that have shaped early human evolution. My research has focused on ranging behavior, territoriality, aggression, and tolerance and has led me to field work in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Senegal. Furthermore, I have looked at conservation issues including the effects of war on bonobo behavior as well as competition between primates and humans for forest resources.
Curriculum Vitae
E-mail: mwaller@uoregon.edu

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Joan Wozniak
Courtesy Research Associate

Areas of Interest: Dr. Wozniak earned her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Oregon Department of Anthropology. Her dissertation, based on an archaeological survey and series of excavations, discussed the environmental changes that resulted from the colonization of Easter Island by Polynesian peoples. She conducted a geoarchaeological study of agricultural soils— with a special interest in the structural and chemical characteristics of soils and the microfossils contained within the archaeological sediments.   She continues to research the general subsistence practices on Rapanui—food production and foraging. She also is involved in research on Micronesian and Western Pacific ceramics, a continuation of her MA interests.
E-mail: joanw@uoregon.edu

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Kristin Yarris
Assistant Professor, International Studies and Women’s & Gender Studies

Education: BA Sociology/Anthropology, Lewis & Clark College (1994); MPH Community Health Sciences, MA Latin American Studies, UCLA (2004); PhD Anthropology, UCLA (2011)
Areas of Interest: Global health, medical & psychological anthropology, gender & migration, transnational family life, children’s experiences of migration, intergenerational caregiving, transnational circuits of reproduction, family health & wellbeing, migrant and refugee health, humanitarianism and humanitarian ethics, social and cultural determinants of health, narratives and idioms of distress; Nicaragua, México, Latin America.
E-mail: keyarris@uoregon.edu

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