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William Ayres
Professor

Education: B.A., Wyoming (1966); Ph.D., Tulane (1973)
Areas of Interest: Dr. Ayres has been a professor at UO since 1976. His research interests include the development of chiefdoms and early food production, especially in the Pacific Islands (Micronesia, Polynesia) and in Southeast Asia.  He is continuing archaeological investigations at Pohnpei’s Nan Madol site, known for its massive stone architecture. Dr. Ayres uses computer graphics to facilitate architectural reconstruction and is engaged in provenance studies of archaeological materials, especially stone building resources and ceramics through geochemical analysis.
Curriculum Vitae
Office Location: Condon 273
Office Phone: (541) 346-5119
E-mail: wsayres@uoregon.edu
Website: http://pages.uoregon.edu/wsayres/

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Diane Baxter
Senior Lecturer & Head Undergraduate Advisor

Education: B.A. UCLA (1976); M.A., California State University-Northridge (1982); Ph.D. UCLA (1991)
Dr. Baxter joined the UO Anthropology Department in 1996. Baxter’s research focuses on the politics of identity among displaced persons, women, and indigenous peoples in colonial and postcolonial societies. Her area focus is the Middle East, in particular Israel/Palestine. Currently she is studying Palestinian refugees in the U.S. She was vice-Chair of the AAA’S Committee on Refugees and Immigrants (CORI) and co-editor of CORI’S 24 Selected Papers in Refugee and Immigrant Studies. Her article “Idealized and Devalued: Images of Identity among Palestinians in West Bank Refugee Camps” is included in the CORI volume. A recent article published in Anthropology Quarterly is “Honor Thy Sister: Selfhood, Gender, and Agency in Palestinian Culture.” Baxter also teaches courses for the Conflict and Dispute Resolution (CRES) Program in the Law School and for the Department of Judaic Studies.
Curriculum Vitae
Office Location: Condon 373
Office Phone: (541) 346-5157
E-mail: dbaxter@uoregon.edu

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Aletta Biersack
Professor

Education: B.A., U of Michigan (1965), M.A., History, U of Michigan (1968); M.A., Anthropology, U of Michigan (1970); Ph.D., U of Michigan (1980)
Dr. Biersack is a cultural anthropologist with postgraduate training in both anthropology and history.  She focuses on the culture and history of Pacific peoples, primarily on the Ipili speakers of the Porgera and Paiela valleys, Papua New Guinea, whom she has been studying since the 1970s.  She has published extensively on the topics of political ecology, historical anthropology, and sex/gender, making contributions of an ethnographic and/or theoretical nature.  She is co-editor of Imagining Political Ecology (Duke University Press, 2006) and editor of “Ecologies for Tomorrow” (published in American Anthropologist, 1999), Papuan Borderlands (University of Michigan Press, 1995), and Clio in Oceania (Smithsonian Institution Press, 1991). Her research has been supported by National Science Foundation, Fulbright, Fulbright-Hays, Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, American Philosophical Society, the University of Oregon, and the Center for the Study of Women in Society, University of Oregon.
Research Interests
Office Location: Condon 255
Office Phone: (541) 346-5110
E-mail: abiersac@uoregon.edu

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Stephen Dueppen
Assistant Professor

Education: B.A., University of California-San Diego (1999); M.A., University of Michigan (2004); Ph.D., University of Michigan (2008)
Areas of Interest
: Dr. Dueppen studies the origins and development of complex non-centralized political systems in West Africa. His research, currently centered on the Iron Age archaeological site of Kirikongo in western Burkina Faso, addresses the development and rejection of social ranking, concepts of power in egalitarian societies, and collective action against elites. He has directed multiple seasons of excavation at Kirikongo, and recently conducted a regional survey around it in the Mouhoun Bend region. In addition to Kirikongo and other sites in Burkina Faso, he has done research at sites in Senegal, Kenya, and New Mexico. His research has been funded by amongst others, the National Science Foundation, Smithsonian Institution, American Council of Learned Societies, and National Geographic Society. He has published on Kirikongo and other research projects in American Antiquity, Antiquity, Journal of Archaeological Science, Asian Perspectives, Sahara, and Journal of African Archaeology, and his book Egalitarian Revolution in the Savanna: The Origins of a West African Political System was published in May 2012 by Equinox Press.
Curriculum Vitae
Office Location: Condon 252
Office Phone: (541) 346-5525
E-mail: dueppen@uoregon.edu
Website: http://blogs.uoregon.edu/dueppen/

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Jon Erlandson
Professor

Director, Museum of Natural and Cultural History
Education: B.A., UC Santa Barbara (1980); M.A., UC Santa Barbara (1983); Ph.D., UC Santa Barbara (1988)
Areas of Interest: Dr. Erlandson has been a professor at UO since 1990. An archaeologist who has done fieldwork in California, Oregon, Alaska, and Iceland, Erlandson has written or edited 16 books and published over 200 scholarly articles. Research and teaching interests include the development of maritime societies, historical ecology in coastal environments, human evolution and migrations, the peopling of the Americas, the history of seafaring, traditional technologies, dating methods in archaeology, geoarchaeology, cultural resource management, and collaborative research with indigenous communities. Since 2005, Erlandson has directed the Museum of Natural and Cultural History and the Oregon State Museum of Anthropology at the UO. He is also a co-editor of the Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology.
Curriculum Vitae
Office Location: Museum of Natural and Cultural History
Office Phone: (541) 346-5115
Lab Location: Coastal Archaeology and Human Ecology Laboratory, Building 112
Lab Phone: (541) 346-0662
E-mail: jerland@uoregon.edu

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Scott Fitzpatrick
Associate Professor & Director of Undergraduate Studies

Education: B.A., Eastern Washington University (1994); M.A., University of Montana (1996); M.A., University of Oregon (2003), Ph.D., University of Oregon (2003).
Areas of Interest: Dr. Fitzpatrick is an archaeologist who specializes in island and coastal archaeology, particularly in the Pacific and Caribbean. Much of his research focuses on the investigation of colonization events, subsequent adaptive strategies on smaller islands, exchange systems, chronometric techniques, and historical ecology. He has active field projects in Palau (western Micronesia) and several islands in the Caribbean, including the Grenadines and Nevis. Dr. Fitzpatrick is the founder and Co-Editor of the Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology (Routledge/Taylor & Francis) (currently ranked #1 of /88 archaeology journals and #1 of 444 history journals by SCImago). Recent publications have appeared in the Journal of Archaeological Science, Journal of Biogeography, Latin American Antiquity, Human Ecology, and Radiocarbon. He also has two edited volumes, including Voyages of Discovery: the Archaeology of Islands (Praeger, 2004) and Island Shores, Distant Pasts: Archaeological and Biological Perspectives on the Pre-Columbian Settlement of the Caribbean (University Press of Florida, 2010). His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of the Interior, and the Sasakawa Peace Foundation, among others. Dr. Fitzpatrick teaches several introductory (Introduction to Archaeology) and upper-division (e.g., Caribbean Archaeology, Seacoast in Prehistory) courses, as well as graduate seminars (e.g., Archaeological Methods).
Curriculum Vitae
Office Location: 272 Condon Hall
Office Phone: (541) 346-9380
E-mail: smfitzpa@cas.uoregon.edu

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Stephen Frost
Associate Professor & Director of Graduate Studies

Education: B.A., California State University-Long Beach (1994); Ph.D., City University of New York (2001)
Areas of Interest: Dr. Frost joined UO as an assistant professor in 2004. Stephen Frost is a paleontologist and morphometrician interested in evolutionary theory as well as human and primate evolution. His research on late Miocene to Pleistocene East African cercopithecids (the Old World monkeys) has focused on describing material from the Afar Region of Ethiopia, as well as the relationship between African cercopithecid evolution and global climatic change. He is also interested in the quantitative analysis of biological shape, particularly using the techniques of geometric morphometrics. He has been participating in fieldwork with the Gona Research Project in the Afar region (directed by Sileshi Semaw) since 2004 and has been involved with a paleontological field work in Tanzania, France, and Greece.
Office Location: Condon 353
Office Phone: (541) 346-5161
Lab Location: 369 Condon
E-mail: sfrost@uoregon.edu
Website: http://pages.uoregon.edu/sfrost/

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Daphne Gallagher
Lecturer & Undergraduate Advisor

Education: B.A., Rice University (1999); M.A., University of Michigan (2004); Ph.D., University of Michigan (2010)
Areas of Interest: Dr. Gallagher studies the relationship between socio-economic systems and agricultural practices over the past two millennia in West Africa. In particular, her archaeological research addresses colonial and post-colonial narratives on traditional agriculture through the study of long-term trajectories of land use and settlement patterns. In addition to directing a regional survey near the Gobnangou escarpment in southeastern Burkina Faso, Dr. Gallagher addresses these topics through collaboration as a paleoethnobotanist on projects throughout the West African savanna/sahel (Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso and Nubia).
Curriculum Vitae
Office Location: Condon 253
Email: daphne@uoregon.edu

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Terry Hunt

Professor and Dean, Robert D. Clark Honors College

Education: B.A., University of Hawai`i at Hilo (1976); M.A., University of Auckland (1980); Ph.D., University of Washington (1989).
Areas of Interest: Dr. Hunt joins the University of Oregon as Dean of the Clark Honors College and professor of anthropology.  He has taught for 24 years at University of Hawai`i. Dr. Hunt has been conducting archaeological field research in the Pacific Islands for more than 30 years.  He has done extensive work in the Hawaiian Islands, Fiji, Samoa, Papua New Guinea, and Rapa Nui (Easter Island).  Since 20001 Dr. Hunt has directed archaeological field research on Rapa Nui, where he and his students continue work on many aspects of the island’s prehistoric past.  His research addresses questions concerning the trajectory of cultural and ecological changes, including the role of the colossal statues and monuments. Dr. Hunt has published numerous scholarly articles on Pacific archaeology, prehistory, and linguistics.  His work has been published in Science, Nature, American Scientist, Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, Journal of Archaeological Science, Pacific Science, Journal of the Polynesian Society, Rapa Nui Journal, and Current Anthropology, among others.  He has co-edited four books, including a collection on historical ecology. In 2008 Dr. Hunt was awarded the prestigious University of Hawai`i Board of Regents Medal for Excellence in Research in recognition of his innovative work on Rapa Nui. In 2005, Dr. Hunt won the University of Hawaii Regents’ Medal for Excellence in Teaching. Dr. Hunt’s recent book (The Statues that Walked: Unraveling the mystery of Easter Island, Free Press, New York, 2011) co-authored with Carl Lipo, revisits the dramatic story of Rapa Nui’s prehistory.  The book won the Society for American Archaeology’s book of the year award, 2011, in the public audience category. Dr. Hunt’s research was the focus of a National Geographic Magazine cover story (July, 2012) and a full-length Nova-National Geographic TV documentary that aired on PBS in November 2012.
Office Location: TBA
Email: TBA

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Lamia Karim
Associate Professor & Associate Department Head

Education: B.A., Brandies University (1984); M.A., University of Michigan (1993); Ph.D., Rice University (2002).
Areas of Interest
: Dr. Karim is associate professor of anthropology at the University of Oregon in Eugene. Her research interests are in globalization, gender, human rights, and social movements. She has published numerous scholarly articles in anthropology journals (Cultural Dynamics, Political and Legal Anthropology, Contemporary South Asia) on gender and globalization, and chapters in edited volumes, and readers on South Asia. Her research has been supported with two postdoctoral fellowships from the Rockefeller Foundation and grants from the National Science Foundation, Fulbright Foundation, Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation and the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research. Dr. Karim’s book is entitled Microfinance and Its Discontents: Women in Debt in Bangladesh, and was published through the University of Minnesota Press (Spring 2011).
Lamia Karim’s Blog
Research Interests
Curriculum Vitae
SAR Seminar 2012
Office Location: Condon 375
Office Phone: (541) 346-5095
E-mail: lamia@uoregon.edu

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Gyoung-Ah Lee
Associate Professor

Education: B.A., Seoul National University (1992); M.S., University of Toronto (1997); Ph.D., University of Toronto (2003)
Areas of Interest: Dr. Lee became an Assistant Professor at the University of Oregon in fall, 2007. Her topical interests are paleoethnobotany, paleoenvironment, social complexity in early states, transition from foraging to food production, traditional farming technologies, phylogenetics of crops, labor organization, ideology of food, gendered archaeology, and quantitative archaeology. Her chronological and geographic interests include Neolithic, Bronze, and early historical periods in Korea; the Neolithic to Shang periods in China; Jomon-Yayoi periods and Ainu history in Hokkaido; and Late Woodland & Iroquoian tradition in the eastern North America. Her recent publications include “Contextual analysis of plant remains at the Erlitou-period Huizui site, Henan, China” (with S. Bestel), Bulletin of the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association (BIPPA) 27: 49-60 (2007); “Plants and People from the Early Neolithic to Shang periods in North China” (with G. W. Crawford, L. Liu, and X. Chen.). PNAS 104(3): 1087-1092 (2007); and “Review of new data on rice domestication in China” (in Korean with the English abstract). Journal of the Korean Archaeological Society 61: 42-69 (2006).
Curriculum Vitae
Office Location: Condon 254
Office Phone: (541) 346-4442
Website: http://pages.uoregon.edu/anthro/lee-research/
E-mail: galee@uoregon.edu

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Sandra Morgen

Professor, Vice Provost for Graduate Studies and Associate Dean of the Graduate School

Education: B.A., University of Texas (1972); Ph.D., University of North Carolina (1982) Areas of Interest: Dr. Morgen is Vice Provost for Graduate Studies and Associate Dean of the Graduate School and a Professor of Anthropology. Her research has long focused on the intersection of gender, race, class and public policy in the U.S., with a particular focus on health, social welfare and tax politics. Her current research explores the cultural politics of taxes in the U.S., including ethnographic research on anti-tax movements such as the Tea Party and on how tax-related Oregon ballot initiatives reflect and produce changing discourses about taxes, the State and the public sector.

Her most recent books are Stretched Thin: Poor Families, Welfare Work and Welfare Reform (coauthored with Joan Acker and Jill Weigt, Cornell University Press, 2010); Into Our Own Hands: The Women’s Health Movement in the U.S. 1969-1990 (Rutgers University Press, 2002), winner of the Eileen Basker Prize from the Society for Medical Anthropology, 2004; and Taxes are a Woman’s Issue (coauthored with Mimi Abramovitz, Feminist Press, 2006). She is also a co-editor of recent edited books, including Work, Welfare and Politics (with Joan Acker, Frances Fox Piven and Margaret Hallock, 2002) and Rethinking Security: Gender, Race, and Militarization (with Barbara Sutton and Julie Novkov, 2007).

She has received the Career Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Field of Anthropology of the U.S from the Society for the Anthropology of North America, the Squeaky Wheel Award for Dedication to Achieving Greater Gender Parity for Women in Anthropology from the American Anthropological Association, and the Martin Luther King and Charles Johnson awards from the University of Oregon. She is past President of the Society for the Anthropology of Society for the Anthropology of North America, former President of the Association for Feminist Anthropology, and an appointed member of the American Anthropological Association Commission on Race and Racism.
Office Location: Susan Campbell Hall 139
Office Phone: (541) 346-2800
E-mail: smorgen@uoregon.edu

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Madonna L. Moss
Professor

Education: B.A., William and Mary (1976); M.A., UC Santa Barbara (1982); Ph.D., UC Santa Barbara (1989)
Areas of Interest: As an anthropological archaeologist, Madonna Moss studies the long term history of Native Americans and First Nations of the Northwest Coast of North America, with a special focus on Tlingit and Haida and their ancestors. Her book, Northwest Coast: Archaeology as Deep History, moves beyond standard culture historical treatments to re-evaluate new archaeological data on the Northwest Coast within their larger socio-political contexts. With Aubrey Cannon (McMaster University), she co-edited The Archaeology of North Pacific Fisheries, which brought together studies from Alaska and British Columbia south to Puget Sound. Her current field and laboratory research in southeast Alaska concerns how use of animal resources is foundational to the cultural identity and heritage of indigenous groups, and how zooarchaeology can contribute knowledge to improve fish and wildlife management and simultaneously support Alaska Natives in their contemporary subsistence practices. Some of her work with Tlingit community scholars is available in Haa Atxaay aa Kustee Sitee, Our Food is Our Tlingit Way of Life published by the USDA Forest Service, Alaska Region. She has studied the use of shellfish, fish, birds, marine mammals and land mammals, the remains of which are found in archaeological sites. Recent papers consider the association of birds with stone artifacts known as crescents (Journal of World Prehistory), distinguishing salmon species using ancient DNA (Journal of Archaeological Science) and the study of ancient herring bones (PLoS One and PNAS). Her chapter in Shell Energy: Mollusc Shells as Coastal Resources, looks beyond subsistence to consider the social and symbolic meanings of shellfish to the Kwakwakawakw in comparison to the Tlingit. With Dongya Yang, Camilla Speller, and Antonia Rodrigues, Moss is currently investigating the aDNA of Pacific herring in Alaska with the ultimate goal of helping to restore this critical forage fish species. Moss also serves as Curator of Zooarchaeology for the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History and maintains a comparative collection of North Pacific specimens in the Department of Anthropology.
Curriculum Vitae
Office Location: Condon 327
Office Phone: (541) 346-6076
Lab Location: 264 Condon Hall
E-mail: mmoss@uoregon.edu
Website: http://blogs.uoregon.edu/mmoss/

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Terry O’Nellterry o'nell profile photo
Associate Professor

Education: B.A., Notre Dame (1981); M.A., Harvard (1985); Ph.D., Harvard (1992)
Areas of Interest: Dr. O’Nell has been an associate professor at UO since 1998. Theresa O’Nell is a medical and psychological anthropologist who has worked with Native American peoples for fifteen years. Her findings on culture and depression among the Flathead people of Montana appear in her book Disciplined Hearts: History, Identity, and Depression in an American Community (U of California Press 1996). Currently she is midway through a 5-year project on history, colonialism, and mental health among the people of a Northern Plains tribe. Dr. O’Nell’s teaching and research interests include medical anthropology, postcolonial psychology, and contemporary Native American life.
Office Location: Condon 372
Office Phone: (541) 346-5100
E-mail: tonell@uoregon.edu

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Philip W. Scher
Associate Professor

Education: B.A., Brown University (1987); M.A., University of Pennsylvania (1991); Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania (1997).
Areas of Interest: Dr. Scher has been at the University of Oregon since 2002. His area of focus is the Caribbean, with primary research interests in the politics of heritage and cultural identity, popular and public culture, Folklore, cultural studies and political economy. His publications include two edited volumes: Perspectives on the Caribbean: A Reader in Culture, History and Representation from Wiley-Blackwell Publishers (2010) and Trinidad Carnival: The Cultural Politics of a Transnational Festival from Indiana University Press (2007). Other recent publications include his book Carnival and the Formation of a Caribbean Transnation (University Press of Florida, 2003) and “Copyright Heritage: Preservation, Carnival and the State in Trinidad” (Anthropological Quarterly, Summer 2002), and “The Devil and the Bedwetter” (Western Folklore, Summer 2007). His latest work concerns the idea of culture as an economic resource, Critical Heritage Studies, and the implications for anthropology of the copyright and legal protection of expressive culture and folklore as well as a study of World Heritage sites in the Caribbean. He is a 2008-2009 recipient of a Fulbright Senior Scholar award and a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship.
Webpage
Curriculum vitae
Office Location: Condon 319
Office Phone: (541) 346-5104
E-mail: pscher@uoregon.edu

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Carol Silverman

Professor

Education: B.A., CUNY-City College (1972); M.A., University of Pennsylvania (1974); Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania (1979)
Areas of Interest: Dr. Silverman is a cultural anthropologist and folklorist who has been involved with Balkan music and culture for over 30 years as a researcher, teacher, activist, and performer. Focusing on Bulgaria and Macedonia as well as on Balkan Romani immigrants to North America and western Europe, she has investigated the relationship among politics, ethnicity, ritual, music, and gender. She also explores the phenomenon of “Gypsy” music in relation to issues of appropriation, representation, and the negotiation of identities in the world music market. Her book Romani Routes: Cultural Politics and Balkan Music in Diaspora was released in 2012 with Oxford University Press with an extensive accompanying website. Her research has been supported by Guggenheim, IREX, NEH, ACLS, and NCSEER. Among her many articles and book chapters about Balkan folklore and Romani (Gypsy) communities in the U.S. and abroad are: Trafficking in the Exotic with “Gypsy” Music: Balkan Roma, Cosmopolitanism, and “World Music” Festivals, in Donna Buchanan (ed.), Balkan Popular Culture and the Ottoman Ecumene: Music, Image, and Regional Political Discourse (Scarecrow Press 2007); and Education, Agency, and Power among Macedonian Muslim Romani Women in New York City. Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society (Symposium on Romani Feminisms) 38(1), 2012). In 1996, Dr. Silverman was the recipient of a university award for Distinguished Teaching. She teaches courses on the Balkans, Jewish folklore, ethnography, feminism, and performative theories of culture.
Curriculum Vitae
Research Interests
Office Location: Condon 321
Office Phone: (541) 346-5114
E-mail: csilverm@uoregon.edu

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J. Josh Snodgrassjosh snodgrass profile picture
Associate Professor

Education: B.A., UC Santa Cruz (1995); M.A., University of Florida (1998); Ph.D., Northwestern University (2004); Postdoctoral Fellowship, University of Chicago (2004-2005)
Areas of Interest: Dr. Snodgrass is a biological anthropologist who specializes in human evolutionary biology. His research focuses on human adaptation to environmental stressors (such as cold stress), the influence of economic and cultural change on health, and the evolution of the human diet. He has active field projects in northeastern Siberia, the Amazon region of Ecuador, and several locations within the United States. He also directs a research laboratory that focuses on the development and application of minimally invasive techniques (e.g., dried blood spots and saliva) for assessing health and physiology in population-based research. Recent publications have appeared in the American Journal of Human Biology, American Journal of Physical Anthropology, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, and Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, the L.S.B. Leakey Foundation, and the Forensic Science Foundation. He is also co-director (with Susan Antón, NYU) of the Bones and Behavior Working Group. Dr. Snodgrass teaches several introductory classes (Evolutionary Medicine & Introduction to Biological Anthropology), four upper-division courses (Human Growth and Development, Human Biological Variation, Bioanthropology Methods, and Evolutionary Theory), and is involved with two FIGs (Paging Dr. Darwin & Students Without Borders [with Jeff Measelle]).
Teaching Interests
Research Interests
Publications
Lab Information
Office Location: Condon 354
Office Phone: (541) 346-4823
Lab Location: Center for Medical Education and Research, Sacred Heart Medical Center (directions)
Lab Phone: (541) 346-0849
E-mail: jjosh@uoregon.edu
Website: http://www.pinniped.net/snodgrass.html

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Lynn Stephen
Professor

Director, Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS)

Education: B.A., Carleton College (1979); Ph.D., Brandeis (1987)
Areas of Interest: Dr. Stephen is Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences, Professor of Anthropology, and Director of the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies (CLLAS) http://cllas.uoregon.edu/ at the University of Oregon. Her scholarly work has centered the impact of globalization, migration, nationalism and the politics of culture on indigenous communities in the Americas. Her multi-leveled approach which engages political-economy, ethnohistory, and ethnography has provided a hemispheric lens on major challenges faced by indigenous peoples such as out-migration, tourism, economic development, and low-intensity war and their creative responses to these challenges. Her work has also highlighted the accomplishments and importance of indigenous epistemologies and their theoretical and methodological importance to advancing our knowledge about human-environmental connectivity. In addition to her long-term work on indigenous peoples, she has produced ground-breaking analysis on gender, economic development, and migration; globalization and social movements, indigenous autonomy, and the history of Latino communities spread across multiple borders through her concept of transborder communities and migrations. She has a strong commitment to collaborative research and to projects that produce findings that are accessible to the wider public. Read more.
Research Interests
Curriculum Vitae
Office Location: Condon 316
Office Phone: (541) 346-5168
E-mail: stephenl@uoregon.edu

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Kirstin N. Sterner
Assistant Professor

Education: B.A., New York University (2001); M.A., New York University (2005); Ph.D., New York University (2009); Postdoctoral Fellowship, Wayne State University School of Medicine (2009-2011) Areas of Interest: Dr. Sterner joined the Department of Anthropology in the Fall of 2011. The primary focus of Dr. Sterner’s research is to understand the genetic basis of distinctive human traits. As a molecular anthropologist, she uses a combination of comparative genomics and molecular biology to address questions about primate evolution and human biology, health and disease. Dr. Sterner has ongoing interests in human brain evolution and primate adaptation to SIV infection. Dr. Sterner co-directs the molecular anthropology lab in the Anthropology Department. Her research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research and the American Association of University Women.
Office Location: Condon 352
Office Phone: (541) 346-8614
website: http://molecular-anthro.uoregon.edu/Sterner/index.html
Molecular Anthropology Group website: http://molecular-anthro.uoregon.edu/
Lab Location: Center for Medical Education and Research, Room 305
E-mail:ksterner@uoregon.edu

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Larry Sugiyama
Associate Professor

Education: B.A., UC Santa Barbara (1985), M.A., UC Santa Barbara (1991); Ph.D., UC Santa Barbara (1996) Areas of Interest: Dr. Sugiyama is Associate Professor of Anthropology, and Institute of Cognitive and Decision Sciences. He is a cultural anthropologist, evolutionary psychologist and human behavioral ecologist who works at the intersection of cultural and physical anthropology, evolutionary biology, behavioral ecology, and cognitive psychology, asking questions about the nature and evolution of the human mind and the effects of this evolution upon behavior and culture. Since 1993, Dr. Sugiyama has conducted fieldwork among the Achuar, Shiwiar, Shuar and Zaparo forager-horticulturalist groups of Ecuadorian Amazonia. Previously he worked with the Yora of Peru and the Yanomamo of Venezuela. He is founder and co-Director of the U.O. Shuar Health and Life History Project, and is Field Research Director for the Human Universals Project at the Center for Evolutionary Psychology at University of California at Santa Barbara. Larry’s work has been published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Evolution and Human Behavior, American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Human Nature, American Journal of Human Biology, and The Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology. For papers and more on Larry’s work, click on the website link above. Prospective graduate students with background and interests in evolutionary psychology, human behavioral ecology, or human biology who are interested in working with us on the Shuar Health and Life History Project, are strongly encouraged to contact me.
Office Location: Condon 329
Office Phone: (541) 346-5142
E-mail: sugiyama@uoregon.edu
Website: http://pages.uoregon.edu/sugiyama/

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Nelson Ting
Assistant Professor

Education: B.A., Washington University (1999); M.A., University of Missouri (2001); Ph.D., City University of New York (2008)
Areas of Interest
: Dr. Ting’s research involves the use of genetics and genomics to addresses a variety of questions regarding the evolution, behavior, and ecology of the non-human primates. He is particularly interested in elucidating processes that have generated modern patterns of variation in wild primate populations with a special focus on endangered species. This research involves a combination of field and lab-based methods, and Dr. Ting is active in fieldwork across Equatorial Africa and co-directs the Molecular Anthropology Group. Dr. Ting is also faculty in the Institute of Ecology and Evolution, and his projects have been funded by the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, and Primate Conservation Inc.
Office Location: Condon 302B
Office Phone: (541) 346-5509
website: http://molecular-anthro.uoregon.edu/Ting/index.html
Molecular Anthropology Group website: http://molecular-anthro.uoregon.edu/
Lab Location: Center for Medical Education and Research, Rooms 104, 105, and 305
E-mail: nting@uoregon.edu

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Frances Whitefrances white
Associate Professor & Department Head

Education: B.A., Cambridge-U.K. (1980); M.A., Cambridge-U.K. (1981); Ph.D., SUNY-Stony Brook (1986)
Areas of Interest
: As a biological anthropologist and behavioral ecologist, Dr. White’s research interests examine the evolution of human sociality using comparative studies of non-human primates. Her research focuses on the complex interplay between ecology, female sociality, and sex-based social and mating strategies in the evolution of social systems. Dr. White conducts research with bonobos in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and free-ranging lemurs on St. Catherine’s Island, GA. She directs the UO Primate Osteology Lab which houses the UO Primate Osteology Collection along with the Primate Data Lab.
Office Location: Condon 302C
Office Phone: (541) 346-5278
Lab Location: 304 Condon
E-mail: fwhite@uoregon.edu
Website: http://blogs.uoregon.edu/fwhite/
Primate Osteology Lab Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ComparativePrimateOsteologyLab
Primate Osteology Collection website: http://pages.uoregon.edu/anthro/the-uo-comparative-primate-collection/

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Stephen Wooten
Associate Professor; Joint Appointment with
Department of International Studies

Education: B.A., Massachusetts-Amherst (1986); M.A., University of Illinois (1993); Ph.D., University of Illinois (1997) Areas of Interest: Stephen R. Wooten is a sociocultural anthropologist whose research interests include: political economy and ecology, local food systems and expressive culture. Dr. Wooten has been conducting ethnographic field research in Mali since 1992 and has recently begun a study of urban agriculture in Eugene. His research publications include: “Colonial Administration and the Ethnography of the Family in the French Soudan” in Cahiers d’etudes africaines, “Antelope Headdresses and Champion Farmers: Negotiating Meaning and Identity through the Bamana Ciwara Complex” in African Arts and “Losing Ground: Gender Relations, Commercial Horticulture and Threats to Local Plant Diversity in Rural Mali” in an edited volume entitled: Women and Plants: Gender Relations in Biodiversity Management and Conservation. His book The Art of Livelihood: Creating Expressive Agri-Culture in Rural Mali explores the creativity of rural Bamana people. Dr. Wooten has been at UO since 2001.
Office Location: 354 PLC
Office Phone: (541) 346-5299
E-mail: swooten@uoregon.edu

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