This File has been scanned, converted to a TIFF file, an OCR program has been run, and then the file converted to HTML. Any errors are regretted and should be reported to Ekaterina Puffini (ekaterinapuffin@yahoo.com)

PRELIMINARY DOCUMENT - WORK IN PROGRESS UNCORRECTED AND UNEDITED. NOT NORMATIVE

REGULAR MEETING OF THE FACULTY UNIVERSITY OF OREGON October 5, 1977

The meeting was called to order by President William Boyd at 3:37 p.m. on October 5, 1977, in room 150 Geology.

There being no corrections, the minUtes of the meeting of June l were approved as distributed.

MEMORIALS

FRANCIS DART MEMORIAL. Mr. Michael Moravcsik presented a memorial for Professor Francis Dart who died June 21, 1977. Mr. Dart served on the University of Oregon faculty from 1949 to 1977. The text of the memorial is included in these minutes on pages 4 ar~d s.

BOli,7ER ALY MlEP4IORlAL. Mr. Charley Leistner presented a memorial for Professor Bower Aly who died August 28, 1977. Mr. Aly served on the faculty at the University of Oregon from 1957 to 1973. The text of the memorial is included in these minutes on pages 6-8.

By a standing unanimous vote and a minute of silence, the faculty accepted these memorials for inclusion in the permanent record of this meeting.

ANNOUNCEMENTS -

UNITED PIAY. Mr. Ivan Niven announced that he is the chairman of the United Way fund drive this year. He encouraged all faculty members to contribute and indicated that each would be contacted personally.

ADVISORY COUNCIL (:OFI7EIl !I:iOI~'R. Mr. Norman Sundberg, secretary of the Advisory Council, announced that an informal coffee hour for all faculty would be held at 4:00 p.m., October 24 in the Faculty Center.

NEW BUSINESS

FACULTY RE-fIRE:~'~i~iT. Mr. Norman Sundberg, Secretary of the Advisory Council, presented the following notice of motion: "On behalf of the Faculty Advisory Council, I move that there be established an ad hoc committee to study the question of faculty retirement. The committee would particularly investigate the impact of var~ous policies such as mandatory age requirements and early retirement schemes, and other related issues. It would also be concerned with determining faculty opinion. The committee would report results and recommendations to the University Assembly by April, 1978."

STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY

The President spoke on the state of the University. Summarized below are the major points of his address.

The student head count of l6,662 is down from last year but is still above our budgeted figure. The critical factor of carrying load is not known at this time. The College of Arts and Sciences is up slightly, Business Administration is up about six percent, the other professional schools vary somewhatj but overall, there is a slight decrease. The Freshman class, which is important to the future of the University, is up approximately 100. The University has 67 new faculty this year, 47 full-time and 20 part-time. The departments are delighted with the quality of the faculty we have been able to recruit.

A number of other recent factors demonstrate the high quality of the University. Honors won by the faculty in the last year, together with the attitude of the students indicated through surveys, speak well of the quality of this institution. But in addition to the good things, some things are not so good. Among these are poor advising, poor building maintenance, inadequate computing services, inadequate registration procedures and inadequate planning.

Budgetary conditions have made it necessary to impose heavy cuts on CSPA and to recommend suspension of the School of Librarianship. The program commitment of CSPA will continue and L-ibrarianship will some day be reopened when funding permits. The school librarian program and media specialist training will be continued and we look forward to a summer program for librarians in cooperation with the State Librarian.

A number of changes are being made in the administrative sturcture of the University. The role of the Provost is expanding into the areas of budgeting,

planning, and student affairs. A search is now underway for a new Vice President !
for Public Services. Two advisory councils and the accreditation report have j

urged expansion of our external relations program. The new vice president will add to our resources rather than be a drain on them. This position will administer not only University relations but development, alumni affairs, governmental relations and public relations of other kinds. Searches are also underway for an Associate Provost for Studebt Affairs, a Director of the Labor Education and Research Center and for a Registrar. The faculty is playing an important role in each of these searches.

A number of areas of anxiety within the University have arisen; for example, the open campus concept as it relates to employment recruitment. The issue involved here is the rights of students who want to be interviewed vs the rights of students to impose restrictions on political, ideological or moral grounds. It is the President's understanding of the Oregon tradition and the Administrative Rules that openness is in order. It permits people on campus with ideas that are repugnant to many, but we must resist those who want to restrict access to the University. While he respects dissent and protest, the President will not permit actions that threaten the freedom of speech or movement on this campus. "If we stand as one community equally pledged to respect dissent and to insist on an open University we have little to fear from those who do not share our values."

Higher admission standards for the University have been recommended by the Advisory Council. If we move to higher standards for admission we may lose students to start with but we should pick up enough to make up for this and we will gain better students. "The difficulty is that we may alienate some of the public because of a charge of elitism."

The possibility of extending the faculty retirement age to 70 has come to the forefront through a bill before the United states Congress. The issue of agism has been added to racism and sexism. "We have become conscious of past inequities or insensitivities fostered by middle-aged white male heterosexuals.!' While we may applaud this change, it comes at a bad time--at a time when universities have been thinking of earlier retirements. The steady state university with few retirements provides little opportunity for the infusion of youth. In the best of times universities have a knowledge obsolescence problem. Sabbatical leaves, for example, are intended to help solve that problem. With knowledge expanding, the University not growing and with fewer retirements we may be faced with stagnation. i'The problem is not that older people lose competence, but that new competencies are required."

The University must expand its contribution to the larger community. This requires that we spread our classes across the clock. The goal should be one-third in the A.M., one-third in the P.M., and one-third in the evenings. This will reach new students, it will serve present students better, it will increase carrying load of our students, and it will enrich both the University and society. We must be willing to do this in order to make the University of service to the community. "We must re-orient universities and re-dedicate ourselves."

''The love of our work should express itself not only in our dedication to /-

scholarship but in our genuine concern for students." We must engage in good teach- - ing, we must make ourselves available to the students, we must treat them with dignity i and compassion. By making the University a better learning environment for students, we need not fear for lack of support. "If we gain affection--even respect-support will follow." ADJOURNMENT

The meeting was adjourned at 4:50 P.M.

Marshall D. Wattles Secretary of the Faculty

~ FRANCIS DART, 1915-1977. There are some people whose trace in this world can be fairly well described in terms of a formal biography, listing the various specific creations and accomplishments. Fran Dart was not among such people. This is not to say that his formal biography does not testify to a productive life of involvements, achievements, and recognitions. But beyond these, Fran Dart exerted an influence on the world by the style in which he approached his tasks, and by the human elements of the contacts he had with others. He was a soft-spoken, quiet person, an antithesis of the extroverted, flashy character that is often thought nowadays to be indespensible for success As a result, he has probably influenced a smaller number of people than his capability and wisdom would have merited. But those who did know him could hardly avoid being left with the longstanding memory of a person who though deeply, talked with consideration and compassion, and belonged to a rare breed in any society or any age, namely the sage, not infallible or omniscient, but with an overall view of the work and an aura of serenity in his heart.

In of£ering a more specific summary of Fran Dart's life, I will now follow an obituary that was recently sent in for publication to Physics Today, the largest trade journal of physicists.

Francis Dart, who died at the age of 62 on June 21, 1977, was a true example of an internally motivated pioneer. After his Ph.D. from Cornell in 1947, his first decade of professional life centered around research in experimental solid state physics and around science teaching. In 1957, however, he went to Nepal as a member of the project of the University of Oregon, funded by the International Cooperation Administration ("point-four program"). After two years in Nepal, undoubtedly also spurred by memories of childhood experience (he grew up in Angola of missionary parents), his interest, commitment, and perceptive talents had been permanetly-captured by the aim to understand the view of nature in non-Western countries with such a cultural tradition. He was a pioneer and at the same time a most penetrating contributor of this problem area. Early in this new career of his, he attained the distinction, rather rare for a physicist, of publishing an article in Foreign Affairs (Vol. 41, 360, 1963), which remains a classic in its simplicity and beauty as it analyzes attitudes toward change, the inevitability of transformation in the developing countries, and the implications of the scientific revolution for non-Western cultures. Dart saw science not as a force destroying traditional life, but as a "second culture" which complements other views of the world both in Western and non-Western civilizations.

.

The specific implications of cultural differences in the view of nature and of knowledge were discussed by Dart and his Nepalese colleague, the psychologist Dr. Panna Pal Pra & an, in another pivotal article in Science (Vol. 155, 649, 1967). This article demonstrates how Nepalese thinking smoothly accepts the simultaneous existence of two explanations of a given natural phenomenon that in our Western thinking would be considered mutually exclusive. As to the origin of knowledge about nature, the research carried out by Dart and Panna Lal Pradhan over the two years in Nepal illustrates clearly that Nepalese thought considers knowledge a closed domain, with everthing to be known being already known by an old man or being deposited in a book. Dart not only created such new insights, however, but aiso used them for specific suggestions toward the reshaping of science education around the world. In particular, he helpe-d train several Peace Corps groups who went on to Nepal as teachers.

In recent years Dart had an opportunity to pursue similar research in Papua, New Guinea, and his observations and conclusions, described for example in the Australian journal Search (Vol. 4, 322, 1973) further enriched our understanding of the variety of ways different cultures related to the world around us.

Dart was a quiet, most modest person, deriving pleasure and satisfaction from the fascination and inner excitement that the exploration of virgin territory in human knowledge can bring. At the same time, he was also spurred by the Quaker preoccupation with service, with which, he believed, his research harmonized. He taught at the University of Oregon for 28 years and also served as director of the Honors College, within which he initiated an independent study program. His impact remains in the memory of faculty and students who often sought his low keyed, wise, and always sympathetic opinion and advice.

Submitted by Michael Moravcsik

By a standing unanimous vote and a minute of silence, the faculty accepted this memorial for inclusion in the permanent record of this meeting, and that copies be sent to the family of Franeis Dart.

. BOWER ALY, 1903-1977. Bower Aly, Professor Emeritus of Speech, died on August 28, at
the age of 74.
Perhaps it is significant testimony to his excellence that the three institutions
that awarded him his academic degrees later brought him to their faculties. Having
earned his baccalaureate degree from Southeast Missouri State College in 1925, he
served on that faculty from 1926 to 1930. From 1930 to 1957 he taught at the llniversity
of Missouri, the institution that had granted him his Master's degree in 1926. And
Columbia University, where he earned his doctorate in 1941, later invited him to return
there as a visiting professor
Bower came to the University of Oregon in 1957 and served our University until his
retirement in 1973. He came to Oregon already nationally and internationally established
as a scholar in the history of American public address. His dozen books and score or
more monographs testify to his scrupulous scholarship and enormous energy. His work,
frequently on the intellectual horizons of his discipline when written, often became the
hallmark for other scholars to repair to in their own work.
Responsibility and honor were continually awarded him. He served the Speech
Communication Association, the national organization for his discipline, as president
in 1944 and as editor of the Quarterly Journal of ~ from 1951 through 1953. That
association granted him its Distinguished Service Award in 1975.
He served the National University Extension Association for more than thirty years
as Executive Secretary of its Committee on Discussion and Debate. For all that time he
edited the Forensic Quarterly, which brought instruction and research materials each
year to tens of thousands of high school debaters throughout the nation. In 1965 he was
awarded the N.U.E.A.'s Julius M. Nolte Award for distinguished service to that organiza-
tion and to the nation.
Even after reaching emeritus status, he accepted a visiting appointment at Kent
State University where his teaching and leeturing in the State of Ohio were recognized
with the Elizabeth G. Andersch Award from Ohio University for service in speech communi-
cation and with a resolution praising his service to the State and Nation, introduced
and passed in the Senate of the General Assembly of Ohio.
On the Oregon campus his colleagues chose him for membership on the President's
Advisory Couneil and frequently elected him to the University Faculty Senate. He
served as an active President of the Friends of the Library during a time our library
needed all the strong-willed £riends it could find.
His institutional and professional interests were an outgrowth of his seholarly
study. He understood the role of rhetoric in the history of decision making in the
myriad organization and assemblies of the United States and he regularly added his
influence to the fullest of his considerable energy and informed intellect.
In our deliberations, we grew to know Bower a a man of strong opinion and as a
knowledgeable, patient, persistent advocate and antagonist. It could be no other way.
Bower's life followed his art. He believed to his marrow that the best decisions on
substantive questions are the carefully examined ones. He had little patience with
non-negotiable demands and always insisted that any policy deserved careful scrutiny
and that supporters of a policy should be compelled to muster a persuasive public defense.
Further he taught and practiced that public examinations of substantive questions
should be orderly, thorough, and procedurally correct, sometimes,--in the eyes of
opponents and occasionally his supporters--excruciatingly thorough and correct.
His belief in free and full and orderly debate made him an ardent and eloquent
defender of academic freedom, from Senator Joseph McCarthy and McCarthyism in one
decade, from those who would suppress free speech "for the good of the people" in
another decade, and from short-sighted, self-serving educational administrations
through career-long participation with the National AAUP Academic Freedom and Tenure
Committee.
He was a keen student of parliamentary procedure from its British application in
the debates in the House of Commons, through its migration to the nation making of
the American Revolution and the Constitutional debate, to the decision making of
involuntary associations and public bodies, such as this faculty.
And he subscribed to the premise that responsible citizens could disagree vehemently
in public disputation without foregoing respect, even affection, in day-to-day inter-
action. A student of the American process he could flay an opponent in a public assembly
for a "wrong" opinion, and stroll from that assembly in amiable conversation to discuss !
another question in a department meeting apparent, and real, respect and good will. For i
Bower, public debate was not a supportive arena for the insecure, the thin-skinned, the t
petty person. Bower Aly was a tough opponent---but he prepared no enemies lists. He
practiced what he taught and what his scholarship taught him.
The Aly home on Twenty-second Avenue was a gracious locus for continuing gatherings
of family, students, friends, colleagues, vistors from the Nation and the world. Bower
and Lucile Aly welcomed everyone for food, drink, and conversation. Students and
colleagues frequently found a home away from home while settling into Eugene or Columbia,
Missouri. One student came to say overnight and remained six months. Bower and Lucile
cared for students beyond the classroom. Students marveled at their interest, their
moral support, the gift or loan at a critical moment in their lives, and the maintenance
of a veritable private employment agency throughout their careers.
His students conceived and published a Festschrift volume in recognition of his teaching and titled it Rhetoric of the People: "Is there any better or equal hope in in the world?" in keeping with Bower's lifelong perspective on public discourse in the United States.

Bower once wrote that "some histoTian, seeking to understand Americanculture not as established fact with all the resultants known, but as a series of problems in courses of action, would. .endeavor to see the American people in each successive generation engaging in the process of persuading each other to do what they want done." For him, "Public Speaking is the great American Folk Art," and that art must be sought in "oratory as it has been spoken, not only by the so-called giants but by the fellows at the fork of the creeks; not by Abraham Lincoln alone but by the other boys at Clary~s Grove." And not by national leaders on educational policy alone---but by the faculty of the University of Oregon in regular session assembled.

Mr. President, I move that his memorial be made a part of the permanent record of this faculty meeting and that copies be sent to the family of Bower Aly.

Submitted by Charley A. Leistner Professor of Speech REGULAR MEETING OF THE FACULTY UNIVERSITY OF OREGON November 2, 1977

The meeting was called to order by Vice President Paul Olum at 3:35 p.m. on November 2, 1977j in room 150 Geology.

There being no corrections, the minutes of the meeting of October~ 5 were approved as distributed.

UNFINISHED BUSINESS -

FAC/.L.TY PETI~~~~~?erF. Mr. Norman Sundberg was recognized to present the following motion on behalf of the Faculty Advisory Council: "That there be established an ad hoc committee to study the question of faculty retirement. The committee would particularly investigate the impact of various policies such as mandatory age requtrements and early retirement schemes, and other related issues. It would also be concerned with determining faculty opinion. The committee would report results and recommendations to the University Assembly by April, 1978."

Following a second, Ms. Catherine Jones reported the University Senate vote as 31 in favor and none against and no abstentions. Mr. Norman Sundberg spoke to the motion, followed by Mr. Ronald Sherriffs' the Senate Reporter. The motion was adopted by voice vote without dissent.

ADJOURNMENT

There being no further business the faculty meeting adjourned at 3:45 p.m.

Marshall D. Wattles Secretary of the Faculty

REGULAR MEETING OF THE FACULTY UNIVERSITY OF OREGON December 7, 1977

The meeting was called to order by Vice President Paul Olum at 3:35 p.m. on December 7, 1977, Room 150 Geology.

There being no correction, the minutes of the meeting of November 2 were approved as distributed.

ANNOUNCEMENTS AND MEMORIALS.

JOH~N~FOSI(ETT MEt~RitAL. Mr. Walter Martin presented a memorial for Mr. John Foskett who died October 6, 1977. Mr. Foskett joined the University of Oregon faculty in 1946. He retired in August 1974 and was Professor Emeritus at the time of his death. The text of the memorial is included in these minutes on pages 4-5.

h.AS.~.Y:ALP~R:1 MEMORIkL. ~Mr. Marshall Wattles presented a memorial for Mr Harry Alpert who died NovembeT 5, 1977. Mr. Alpert came to the University of Oregon in 1957 as Dean of the Graduate School and remained an active member of this faeulty until his death. The text of the memorial is included in these minutes on pages 6-8. By a unanimous standing vote the Assembly ordered these memorials placed in the permanent record of this assembly and copies sent to the families.

I~'`.XT FA.CH.T.TY MJETING. The Chairman stated that the January meeting of the faculty will be on January 8, 1978.

G::~~ DUATE CObNCTL ELEC'1ION. The Chairman announced that the following faculty members had been elected to the Graduate Council for two-year terms: Mr. Stoddard Malarkey and Mr. Joel McClure from the College of Arts and Sciences, Mr. Jan Broekhoff and Mr. Clarence Schminke from the professional schools.

C~RTIFICKrI.OPT OF. ~A~+L FFiR\~.GP~ADUA~EC.. Mr. R~bert James moved as follows: "That the

facul.ty of the University of Oregon recommend that the Oregon State Board of Higher I

Education confer upon the persons whose names are included in the Official Degree List, as complied and certified by the University Registrar after the December 9, 1977 Graduation Convocation, the degrees for which they have completed all requirements."

The motion was seconded, put to a vote and carried.

l:h~ITED WAY. Mr. Ivan Niven announced that the University~s United Appeal drive is going well and that he expects the 1977 goal will be reached in a few days. He thanked all of those who had contributed to making this drive successful.

CtIRISTt~tAS PA~tY. Mr. George Struble called at.tention to the Faculty Club Christmas party to be held on December 8 at 4:00 p.m. in the Faculty Center. He also stated that the food service at the Faculty Center will continue through Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of examination week.

CURRICULI.~ PF.PORT. Mr. Joseph Hynes, Chairman of the Curriculum Committee, was recognized to present the report of the committee. The report had previously been circulated and Mr. Hynes indicated a number of changes that should be made. Ms. Catherine Jones, on behalf of the University Senate, moved that the Assembly approve the Report of the Curriculum Committee, dated November 23, 1977, beginning with the first page and continuing through arabic numberal 25 of the document headed "Proposed Course Changes for 1978-79."

Vice President 01um said that in keeping with the University custom, the report would be consideTed seriatim.

Consideration began with page 1. At page 13 Mr. James Davies moved to insert "PS 471, The Human Organism and Politial Development, 3 credit hours, with the description as follows: An analysis of the implications for political development and political violence of research and theory in the central nervous and endocrine systems. A major purpose is to review such research and theory as can help to evaluate conventional assumptions about the innateness of violent political behavior. This is not a laboratory research course, but students can move more rapidly in it if they have had one or more courses in neurophysiology, physiological psychology, or developmental psychology. Since this cannot yet be expected of all or even many students, the prerequisite is PS 470, Political Behavior, or PS 507, Seminary in Political Behavior, or Instructor's consent. Usually offered in Winter term. Davies.l'

Following a second, Mr. Warren Smith, Reporter for the University Senate, stated that the Senate had previously voted to delete this course by a vote of 23 to 15.

Following a lengthy and spirited debate, the motion was put to a vote and carried.

At page 14 Mr. Don Taylor moved to change the title of Psy 361 from "Psychology of Art" to "Psychology of Graphie Art." The motion was seconded. Following a brief exchange, Mr. Jacob Beck suggested that the amendment be changed to "Psychology of Visual Art." The change was accepted by Mr. Taylor and there was no objection. Mr. David Stannard moved to amend the amendment by changing the title to "Pschology of Aesthetic Perception." After a brief discussion Mr. Stannard withdrew his motion to amend. He then moved to amend by changing the title to "Psychology of Visual Perception." After a brief discussion, a member of the Assembly moved the previous question, it was seconded, put to a vote and adopted by a substantial majority. Mr. Stannard's motion ot amend was put to a vote and defeated. The motion to amend by changing the title to "Psychology of Visual Art" was pUt to a vote and carried.

After completing examination of the Report, by substantial majority the Assambly adopted the motion to approve the Report as amended.

NEW BUSINESS

FAC~ff~\ Cf.~~!T~~~~. Ms. Catherine Jones, on behalf of the University Senate, presented the following notices of motion: "1. At the January meeting of the University Assembly, I shall move on behalf of the Committee on Committees that the Educational Opportunity Committee be abolished. 2. At the January meeting of the University Assembly, I shall move on behalf of the Committee on Committees that the Academic Distinction Committee be abolished "

GRAnihiC SYST~~. Mr. Robert James presented the following notice of motion: "On behalf of the Academic Requirements Committee, at the January meeting, I will propose the following amendment to the June 10, 1970 legislation regarding the grading system: 'I move to amend section two under GRADING SYSTEM to read as follows: (23 The minimum University credits for an undergraduate degree will be 186 hours of satisfactory work, appropriately distributed as to group requirements, major field, and other University requirements. A minimum of 45 hours of passdifferentiated work must be taken in residence. tIn degree programs where specifically required courses in the major department are offered only on a passundifferentiated basis, the credit hours earned in such courses may be counted as satisfying this graded hour requirement). There is no grade-point average requirement for graduation. Instead, 85 per cent of all work completed at the University of Oregon must be passed with grades of A, B, C, D, or P.' The change being proposed is the addition of the parenthetical statement dealing with required major course work that is offered (as per catalog description) only on a pass/no-pass basis."

ADJOURNMENT

There being no further business the meeting adjourned at 5:20 p.m.

Marshall D. Wattles Secretary of the Faculty

JOHN M. FOSKETT, 1909-1977. John M. Foskett was born on July 22, 1909 on a farm outside Napa, California. He died unexpectedly on October 6, 1977 at his home in Eugene, Oregon.

After spending his childhood and youth in what was then rural California, John Foskett entered the University of California at Berkeley and recieved his Bachelors of Arts degree in 1932. He continued his education at that institution and was awarded the Masters of Arts degree in 1935 and the Doctor of Philosophy in 1939. During the course of his graduate studies, Jack became intrigued with the work of Emile Durkheim, a fascination that continued throughout his career. This interest broadened to a thorough concern with general theory and the history of sociology. His courses and seminars in these areas were fundamental elements in both the undergraduate and graduate programs at the University of Oregon for almost thirty years.

Following a five year period as a member of the faculty at the University of Idaho, Jack was appointed as the Idaho State Director of the National Youth Administration in 1941. In 1943, he was promoted to the position of Western Regional Director, and continued to work in that capacity until he joined the faculty of the University of Oregon in 1946. His association with Nationa1 Youth Administration was perhaps responsible for the development of one of Jack's central research concerns. An important segment of his published research deals with public education and the relationships between the community and the educational process. His work in these areas anticipated our current concerns with community participation indecision-making processes, the consequences of local control for the educatiQna1 system, and the dynamic nature of a community's expectations with respeet to professional educators. These intellectual concerns coupled with Jack's administrative skills were crucial to the growth of social science research facilities on the Oregon campus. He was a key figure in the development of the Institute for Community Studies and the Center for the Advanced Study of Educational Administration, the latter an organization that has remained viable despite the unpredictable nature of funding patterns.

At the University of Oregon, Jack Foskett acquired the reputation of being a demanding but sympathetic teacher. This image was reflected in the culture of one group of graduate students associated with him. These young Turks affectionately referred to their mentor as "Cactus Jack," an appellation which brought a smile to Jack's face and a twinkle to his eyes.

As a professional colleague and university citizen, Jack made important contributions to the development of sociology at the University of Oregon. His counsel was sought frequently and his advice valued. He also was an influential member of the Pacific Sociological Association and served as the President of this organization in 1958. In the mid-fifties Jack was among those who were convinced that the Association would benefit greatly from an official publication of its own, and to a large extent, he was responsible for persuading the Association to undertake what appeared to some

to be a premature and potentially costly adventure. Beginning with the first issue i

in 1958, Jack served as the Editor of the new journal, the Pacific Sociological Review, for nine years. From the outset he successfully sought to produce a sociological journal of high caliber and cosmopolitan concerns. The merit of Jack's efforts is evidenced by the fact that the journal has achieved an influence which extends far beyond the Association's regional domain.

A listing of Jack's accomplishments does not adquately reflect his life. He was a warm, gentle person and in many ways, a very private man. He loved his family and close friends, music, the theater, and the natural beauty of Oregon, and toward these persons, places and things he maintained an unswerving loyalty. His life was characterized by a variety of interests, a concern for others, a gentle but quick wit and a quiet self-confidence. We will miss the professional and the scholar; we will miss the

man even more. -

Walter T. Martin Richard J. Hill Univarsity of Oregon

HARRY ALPERT, 1912-1977. Harry Alpert served University of Oregon for twenty-one years,

as Dean of the Graduate School, Dean of Faculties and as Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, in addition to his academic appointment as Professor of Sociology. He died November 5, 1977 at the age of 65.

He received his baccalaureate degree at City College of New York in 1932 and his doctorate from Columbia University in 1938. During 1932 and 1933 he studied in France and retained thereafter his love for Europe and his interest in international affairs. Before coming to the University he held a number of academic and governmental positions, including a position in the office of Price Administration during World War II and later one in the Bureau of the Budget. He came to the Deanship of the Graduate School from the National Science Foundation where he was head of the Social Science Division. Following five years of service in the Graduate School he was appointed Dean of Faculties in I965 by President Fleming when Robert Clark left the University. His title was changed to Vice President of Academic Affairs and Provost in 1972. Although he preferred the academic title of Dean above the corporate title of Vice President, he acceded to the change when the University adopted the Vice Presidential title. He remained as Vice President and Provost until 1976 when he took his well-earned sabbatical leave to spend time again in Paris, and to teach a semester at the University of Virginia. He looked forward to returning on a full-time basis to teaching and research in the Department of Sociology. It was in his academic discipline that he obtained his national and international recognition and where he seemed to get his greatest personal satisfaction. He was an acknowledged leader in his professional organizations.

Harry served two terms on the Council of the American Sociological Association and in 1959 was elected to the position of Vice President of the association. From 1960 to 1962 he served as editor of the American Sociological Review, the discipline's journal of highest prestige. He own published works, particularly his analysis of the contributions of Emile Durkheim, have been widely acclaimed.

Harry joined the University of Oregon at an important stage of its development. It was a time when the University was maturing, moving from being essentially an under

graduate university to becoming one of the nation's major research universities. He ,~

knew that such a change could only be made through acquiring an outstanding faculty with research accomplishments and potential. During his search for faculty members, Harry was a stickler for quality and it was in his recruiting that he probably made his greatest contribution to the University. He seized upon the growth in student body and resources to add not only quantity but quality, and he emphasized to each school and college that it should try to bring in the best faculty anywhere, without regard to their present location or present salaries. That he succeeded many times is attested to by the quality of the faculty when he left the administration

In his latter years as Vice President he was faced with the task of presiding over reduced budgets and retrenchment. The notorious HPUP, a system for affecting a mandated budget reduction, fell to him to oversee. It was his belief that the faculty should be involved in the process, not because he shunned the responsibility, but rather because he felt that involving more faculty members would bring greater wisdom and credibility to the decisions that were made. That it worked as smoothly as it did was in no small way due to his devotion and leadership.

In his decisions on promotion and tenure he was sometimes thought to be rigid and inflexible and indeed he was. He was rigid in that he required scholarly qualities of the faculty to whom tenure was granted and his inflexibility was drawn from his insistence that the University of Oregon should have the best faculty available. In every case of promotion and tenure that came to him, and there were many, he studied each dossier with great thoroughness and care and spent many hours preparing summaries on the merits of faculty members that he was required by his position to judge. If there was a question in his mind he would lean over backwards to be sure that the faculty member was being fairly evaluated. One could not in his position escape criticism by those who questioned his decisions and when the criticism came his way he never passed the buck. In fact, he seemed deliberately to place himself in the position to take the criticism and to protect others, both those above him and those below.

As a colleague in administration Harry Alpert was one of a kind. He was considerate in his personal relationships, always calm and collected and nearly always with a smile on his face. He defused many tense situations with a quietly told story, sometimes related to the point being discussed, sometimes it was just an incident that amused him. He had a keen sense of humor and enjoyed the funny and the ridiculous and liked to share them with his friends.

In addition to his work at the University as an administrator he was recognized internationally as a scholar and an educational innovator. His fluency in French and his love to return to Europe from time to time to continue his studies, kept him in touch with the academic social science community throughout the world. I was with UNESCO when a vacancy occurred in the Directorship in the Social Science Division. One day over coffee I asked one of the search committee members whom I knew casually, how the search was going and he told me they had narrowed the field to two Americans and one Britisher. I said, "It is unlikely that I know the people you are considering but perhaps I've heard of them. Could you give me their names?" I was more surprised than I should have been that the top name on the list was Harry Alpert. He was later offered the position and reluctantly accepted, reluctant because he didn't like the idea of leaving Oregon for two years, but he found it impossible to forego the opportunity of administering the largest program of its kind in the world. The report that he did an outstanding iob for UNESCO is understandable. He was enticed to stay for a third year but declined a longer appointment. He preferred to return to Oregon and the University. Harry continued his association with the international agency until his death, serving as a member of the United States Commission for UNESCO.

The opportunity to work with Harry Alpert was an education, a lesson in patience, good humor, and wisdom. His concern for the well-being of his colleagues made all who worked for -him care a little more too. And to spend an evening in his home and engage in conversation with Harry and Anitra was an evening to remember. Their interests were broad, their conversations sparkled with enlightenment and good-will. Their contributions to the University community in many respects, expecially in the arts, are things from which we all benefit every day.

As we recognize his contribution to the Vniversity and his discipline it seems ironic that it should have ended so soon after his return to the academic discipline he so greatly enjoyed. He gave much of himself and until only a few days before his death seemed to have so much more left to give. His untimely passing took from our lives a kind and gentle friend and from the University a devoted and loyal servant.

Marshall D. Wattles Vice Provost

Mr. Chairman, I move that these memorials be entered in the permanent record of this meeting and copies be sent to the families of our departed colleagues.

REGULAR MEETING OF THE FACULTY UNIVERSITY OF OREGON January 18, 1978

The meeting was called to order by Vice President Olum at 3:38 p.m. on January 18, 1978 in Room 150 Geology.

There being no corrections, the minutes of the meeting of December 7 were approved as distributed.

ANNOUNCEMENTS AND MEMORIALS

Vice President Olum stated that President Boyd had intended to be present today but other duties intervened. The Emergency Board of the Legislature meets on January 25 and President Boyd has preparatory work to do which prevented his being here.

AD'I[SORY COU~`'CIL. Mr. Norman Sundberg, Secretary of the Faculty Advisory Council, announced that the council will hold an open meeting four o'clock, on January 30, at the Faculty Center, to which all members of the faculty are invited. Free doughnuts and coffee will be served.

JO~ii C. BURG MEMORIAL. Mr. Robert Zimmerman presented a memorial for Mr. John Burg who died on December 30, 1977. Mr. Burg joined the faculty of the Department of Physics of the University of Oregon in 1965. The text of the memorial is included in these minutes on page 3.

F..MiBERT A. FOSSUM b~MOP`rAB. Mr. Kenneth Metzler presented a memorial for Mr. Embert Fossum who died December 21J 1977. Mr. Fossum joined the University of Oregon faculty in 1963 as Professor of Military Science and served the University as Director of Alumni Relations from 1968 to 1972. The text of the memorial is included in these minutes on pages 4-5.

ilE-Rti-ARD L; P,EF.'.4ES~PR MEMOD(~:AL. Mr. Robext Harris presented a memorial for Mr. Bernard Freemesser who died December 18, 1977. Mr. Freemesser had been a member of the faculty for twenty two years and was Professor of Art at the time of his death. His memorial is included in these minutes on pages 6-7.

Following the presentation of the three memorials, Mr. Robert Harris moved that these memorials be entered in the permanent record of this meeting and that copies be sent to the families. The motion was seconded by the others who presented memorials and the motion was adopted unanimously by a standing vote of the Assembly.

UNFINISHED BUSINESS

_ .

FACIjLTY COb~+ITTEES.- Ms. Catherine Jones, on behalf of the Committee on Committees, presented the following motion: "I move that the Academic Distinction Committee be abolished." Ms. Jones presented the Senate vote on this motion as 30 in favor, none against, and two abstentions. Ms. Maradel Gale reported there was no debate in the Senate; the motion was put to a vote and carried unanimously.

Ms. Catherine Jones, on behalf of the Committee on Committees, presented the following motion: "I move that the Educational Opportunities Committee be abolished." Ms. Jones went ahead to report that the Senate vote on this motion 32 in favor, one against, and no abstentions. Ms. Maradel Gale reported there was no debate in the Senate on this motion; the motion was put to a vote and carried unanimously.

GRADING SYS1E~. Mr. Robert James, on behalf of the Academic Requirements Committee, moved that section two under grading system adopted on November 3, 1976 be amended to read as follows: "(2) The minimum University credits for an undergraduate degree will be 186 hours of passing work, appropriately distributed as to group requirements, major field, and other University requirements. A minimum of 90 hours must be earned on a pass-differentiated basis, of which a minimum of 45 hours must be earned in residence. In degree programs where specifically required courses in the maior department are indicated in the catalo~ as bein~ offered onlv on a nass-undiffetentiated basis the

~ ~ O , ~ , ,_ ,

credit hours earned in such courses may be counted as satisfYinp this graded hour requirement. There is no grade-point average requirement for graduate. Instead, 85 per cent of all work graded A, B, C, D, F, P, or N completed at the University of Oregon must be passed. Furthermore, 90 per cent of credit earned at the University of Oregon must be passed with grades of A, B, C, or P." (The underscore constitutes the part to be added to existing legislation.)

Ms. Catherine Jones, Secretary of the University Senate, reported that the Senate's vote on this motion was 34 in favor, none against, and four abstentions. Following a statement by Mr. James and by Ms. Gale for the Faculty Senate, Mr. George Struble moved that the motion be amended by adding after "requirement" "for work in residence."

Following a second of this motion, Mr. James suggested that the motion be changed by adding the word "residence" before "requirements" and not including Mr. Struble's suggestion. Mr. Struble withdrew his motion and there was no obj ection to changing the motion suggested by Mr. James; therefore the work "residence" was included in the motion. The motion was put to a vote and carried unanimously.

NEW BUSINESS

Mr. Fred Mohr, at the request of the ad hoc committee on terms for the Faculty Advisory Council and the Faculty Personnel Committee, gave the following notice of motion: "(1) That the Faculty Advisory Council and the Faculty Personnel Committee each be enlarged to eight members, four members to be elected for two-year terms each year. Eight will be elected to each group in the Spring of 1978, the four top vote-getters among the successful candidates receiving the two-year terms, and the next four successful candidates receiving the one-year terms, respectively.

" (2) All members of the Faculty Advisory Council and the Faculty Personnel Committee shall continue to be elected from the entire University Faculty on an at-large basis.

" (3) No faculty members concurrently serving as members of the University Administration in positions of Vice-President, Provost, Vice, Associate or Assistant Provost, Dean or Associate Dean will be eligible for nomination or election to either the Faculty Advisory Council or the Faculty Personnel Committee." Signed by: Phyllis Ford, Susan Gilmore, Peter H. vonHippel, Arnulf Zweig; Committee.

ADJOURNMENT

. .

There being no further business the meeting adjourned at 4:20 p.m.

Marshall D. Wattles Secretary of the Faculty

JOHN C. BURG, 1936-1977. John C. Burg was born on July 29, 1936, in Tacoma, Washington, and passed away on December 30, 1977, in Eugene, Oregon. He was known as Jack by his friends. Jack was a highly self-motivated person. He was one of those rare individuals who made use of his mind, was talented with his hands, welcomed challenges and actively contributed to their solutions.

Jack was an alumnus of the University of Oregon. After graduating from the University of Oregon in 1959 he taught school in Medford and Roseburg. He returned to the University of Oregon where he was hired as an instructor in the Physics Department. His life was devoted to teaching both in and out of the classroom. He was the instigator of the General Physics Laboratory. He introduced new ways of demonstrating complicated physical principles. Through his experience in teaching the course, he compiled a Lab manual which is usedby the students. In the classroom, he was concerned with unique ways of presenting ideas. In addition to originating the Lab course, he developed the Physical Science Survey course for elementary teachers.

Jack was not only one of the few who excelled in academics, but also he loved and appreciated athletics. For a time Jack assisted the track coaching staff at the University of Oregon. He explored ways of applying his knowledge of physics to the sport of track. As an example of the application of his knowledge of physics to track, he invented the Pace Rule which assists the runner in establishing his pace and aids the spectator in estimating the runner's final time. He was a recognized pole-vaulter himself. In 1957 and 1959, Jack won the Northern Division pole-vault championship.

Where many may have found these to be sufficient activities, Jack continued his broad range of interests in involving himself in Scout work and expended many hours in the pursuit of various hobbies. His favorite hobby was constructing and flying radio-controlled model gliders. This latter interest expressed better than words his free spirit as his gliders flew high about the earth.

He died in the prime of his life at a relatively young age. Knowing that his time was limited, he continued to live life to the fullest possible. He was physically active until his illness would no longer allow him to participate. He continued to teach until the demands of his disease made it impossible. He went forth with a positive outlook by doing creative things with his hands. When it became impossible to do the big things, he did the little things.

The impact of this man's courage, creativity, and multiple interests will remain with students, faculty, and friends.

Submitted by Robert L. Zimmerman University of Oregon

EMBERT A. FOSSUM, 1912-1977. Embert A. Fossum was born on September 1, 1912 in Baker, Oregon. During a career that spanned some forty years, he served variously as a newspaper editor, a much-decorated soldier of World War II and Korea, a career officer in the United States Army, and a teacher and administrator at the University of Oregon. He died in Eugene on December 21, 1977, at the age of sixty-five.

Embert Fossum spent his youth in Klamath Falls, Oregon. He entered the University of Oregon to study journalism, and he received a bachelor of arts degree in 1933. He operated a weekly newspaper in Klamath Falls through the remaining years of the 1930s and into the 1940s. The Second World War intervened with his plans for a journalistic career. He entered the Army in 1942 and served with the 28th Infantry Division in Europe where he commanded an infantry rifle batallion. He also served with the Third Infantry Division in the Korean conflict. Among his numerous military awards were the Bronze Star with two Oak Leaf Clusters and the French Croix de Guerre.

In 1963 Colonel Fossum was assigned to direct the Reserve Officer Training Program at the University of Oregon. He took over this duty just as theFprogram was newly changed from a compulsory to a voluntary one. He felt right at home at his alma mater. It was here that many of us got to know him and to appreciate his individualistic ways. He repaired often to the Faculty Club and to the dining room of the Erb Memorial Union where he conversed with any he chanced to meet~ He displayed a uniquely diverse set of interests, ranging from history to such esoteric items as the construction of river drift boats -- called "Fossum Boats" and named after his ancestral family -- used to drift wild rivers in Norway.

His knowledge of history extended naturally to military history. He had a particular interest in the battles of the Civil War. He had walked through many of those battlefields. When I chanced to tune in a television lecture on history on the educational channel one evening, there was Embert Fossum, delivering a guest lecture, explaining in graphic detail the Battle of Fredericksburg. I can still recall some of the details ten years later, such as the weather (Foggy, then clearing), the temperature (freezing which permitted Federal troops acess over frozen marshes that the Confederates thought inaceessible), and terrain (hilly, easy to defend).

Embert retired from the Army in 1968 after 26 years of service. He was soon thereafter asked to serve as director of Alumni Relations for his alma mater. Those were troubled times. And the troubles were never more intense than in the area of alumni , relations as the strident nature of campus affairs was matched by the strident nature of alumni reactions.

Embert Fossum saw his alma mater through those times, 1968 to 1972, then retired from this second career. At the age of 60 he immediately tood up another interest, that of a graduate student. He t00k classes in journalism history and nonfiction writing, and soon discovered -- or more likely rediscovered -- a talent for putting words together. He wrote nonfic.tion articles in some of the courses, and published several of them in national magazines. His articles usually treated serious subjects, such as retirement, with a delightfuIly light and humorous touch.

He went on to write a thesis that combined his three great interests -- history, newspapering, and the military -- entitled Newsmen on the Warpath. It dealt with the newspaper coverage of three Indian wars, Bannock, Modoc, and Nez Perce, in the Pacific Northwest.

He received-his mater of arts degree in 1973 and shortly after was asked to teach ~
courses in article writing at the school of Journalism. He did so during a period of i

two years.

His death last December ended a varied and distinguished career. Those of us who knew him will miss his inquiring mind, his humanity, his wisdom, his humor, and his deft touch with words.

Submitted by Ken Metzler School of Journalism University of Oregon

BERNARD L. FREEMESSER, 1926-1977. Bernard L. Freemesser was only 51 years old at his

death this past December. He had been directly associated with the University of Oregon for 22 years during which time he created a respected place for photography as an art. Bernie was a highly disciplined craftsman whose photographic images were precisely his creation, not accidental, but always the result of great skill guided by profound intentions. He understood photography as a ianguage and cared about using it to full advantage. He introduced studies in what he called the philosophy of photography. Bernie created and interpreted visual images fluently and assisted vast numbers of colleagues and students to learn the power of images.

Bernard Freemesser was born in Rochester, New-York and had early work experience with the Eastern Kodak Company. During World Was II he served with the marines in the Pacific Theatre and subsequently pursued an active interest in music until 1952 when he began to devote his full attention to photography. From 1955-1964 he held a joint appointment at the University of Oregon as Director of Photographic Services and as a teacher of photography in the School of Journalism. He was promoted to the rank of associate professor in 1964 and became a full-time faculty member in Journalism.

Further promotion to the rank of professor followed in 1969. In 1973-74 Professor ~ 7 Freemesseris title was changed to Professor of Art as his instructional responsibility in photography was transferred to the Department of Fine and Applied Arts.

Bernie's pioneering work in photography education and his achievements as a photographer, as an artist, established him as a leader in the world of photography. His work was represented in exhibitions continuously over two decades and in association with other highly respected and internationally known photographers. He was included in the Dictionary of International Biography. He served:as a member and advisory trustee of the Friends of Photography who will be presenting this spring a retrospective exhibition of Freemesser's photographs. Bernie was active in the Society o£ Photographic Education and served it in numerous capacities including a term as national chairman. He organized national conferences and workshops, and the summer workshops he initiated were nationally known and respected. Through his energy and reputation he was able to bring a continuing stream of major artists-photographers to our campus. And his achievement in establishing the

j Photography in Oregon Gallery in the Museum of Art has allowed photographic exhi-

bitions of great distinction to be brought to the University of Oregon.

Bernie Freemesser worked hard to establish a program in photography, and he succeeded. And his students have helped to establish programs elsewhere. Among Bernie's traits was his persistence. He would not give up an objective. And he seemed to know so well what he was working towards that he did not listen to those who felt he was wrong. He had his own ways of working and they were effective. Many of his notes were finished in the early morning hours. His classes were often in the late afternoon and evening. He wrote an illustrative comment about his experience within the art department in the winter of 1976:

"During the past month potential students dropped in from Louisiana, Texas, California, Tacoma, WA, Pendleton, OR (3), Corvallis, OR t2) to look into the photography program here - all intend to enroll next term or in fall term. Letters this month came to me from Terra Haute and Ft. Wayne, Indiana; Sacramento, CA; Mill Valley, CA; Salzburg, Austria; Denver' Colorado; Ann Arbor, Mich (2); Lawrenceville, N.J.; Providence, RI; Columbus, O: Kalispell, Mont; Corvallis, OR; Lebanon, OR, Rozel, Kansas; Phoenix, AR; Albuquerque, N.M.: Deary, Idaho. All asking about the program or requesting information for summer classes. And the New York Times has also requested information to publish on the summer classes. There's something here that is unique and attractive to people. It may be simply honesty and integrrty. There isn't a night when I come home that I'm not faced with 5 to 6 hours of work relating to the bibliography, correspondence, preparation for the art history classes, organizing exhibits and the like. It lasts until 4:30 - 5:00 a.m. - Friday night I'm in the darkroom for 12 hours, and sometimes also on Saturday night. Often after the Tuesday night Art History class, I find myself talking to one or two students (working in the lab) until 3:30 or 4:00 a.m."

And then another comment about his presence and the presence of photography in the context of fine arts:

`'My personal feeling is one of mutual respect. Photography has been accepted, as I feel that I have been - no more, no less than any other area. More than that we'll have to earn for ourselves. As one painting major blurted out in the beginning class - 'my gawd, the more I attend these crits, and-the more I try to make photographs, the more I realize photography IS an art - maybe we've arrived'."

Bernie never had the facilities appropriate to support his teaching, and perhaps did not always obtain the administrative assistance his outstanding work deserved. He did clearly have the respect and devotion of his students and of his many friends in the world of photography. And virtually alone he established the University as an important place for photography. As a result studies in photography will continue, and Bernard Freemesseris work will remain the standard.

Submitted by Robert S. Harris

Dean, School of Architecture and Allied Arts

University of Oregon REGULAR MEETING OF THE FACULTY UNIVERSITY OF OREGON February 8, 1978

The meeting was called to order by President William Boyd at 3:36 p.m. on February 8, 1978, room 150 Geology.

There being no corrections, the minUtes of the meeting of January 18 were approved as distributed.

UNFINISHED BUSINESS

FACOLTY ELECTIObi. Mr. Peter vonHippel moved as follows: 't(1) That the Faculty Advisory Council and the Faculty Personnel Committee each be increased to include eight faculty members, four members to be elected to tWo-year terms each year.

(To phase in this process, eight members will be elected to the Faculty Advisory Council and eight to the Faculty Personnel Committee in the spring 1978. The first four candidates elected will be assigned two-year terms and the next four candidates elected will be assigned one-year terms. In conformity with previous faculty legislation, any successful candidate currently (1977-78) serving on the Advisory Council or the Faculty Personnel Committee will be eligible only for an additional one-year term on the same committee).

"(2) That the President, Vice-Presidents, Provost, Vice-Provosts, Associate or Assistant Provosts, Deans or Associate Deans be ineligible to serve on either the Faculty Advisory Council or the Faculty Personnel Committee."

Following a second, Mr. Kenneth Ramsing, acting in place of the Secretary of the

University Senate, reported the vote of the Senate as 41 in favor, none against, and i

no abstentions. Mr. Peter vonHippel, Mr. Ramsing and Mr. Ron Rousseve spoke on the

motion after which it was put to;a vote and carried unanimously. 1

l NEW BUSINESS

REkiOVAB OF''IbiCOMPLETES~. MT. William Lamon wi'll move that the legislation of April 5, 1950, be amended as follows: "'To remove an imcomplete, a student must complete the course within his/her next three terms of residency in the University, but no later than

three calendar years after the conclusion of the course for which the incomplete was I
awarded, or at such earlier date as the instructor, dean or department head may specify. =

This restr~ction does not_apply to incompletes assigned pending completion of research projects, theses or terminal projects. This legislation to become effectlve at the beg mning of Fall term 1978."

l'8I-UNIVI.i~.SITY D'OCTOR'OF'E'DUCA-BT'O:N ~7ECkfE.''Mr; Joseph Hynes~ Chairer of the University ~
Committee on the CurTiculum gave the following notice of motion: "At the March meeting |

of the Assembly, I will move, on behalf of the University Committee on the Curriculum, that the current proposal for the instituting and implementing of a Tri-University Doctor of Education degree (Ed.D.) be formally discussed and acted upon by this Assembly. (The precise wording of this motion may be altered before the Senate receives it; but what I have just read is an accurate statement of our Committee's general intent.)"

ROTC ADVI'CRY COt~~iI'TTEP. Mr. Andrew Thomps.'n offered the following notice of motion: "I move to update 2nd amend the structure of the standing ROTC Advisory Committee. The

revised structure would be as follows: The standing ROTC Committee is to consist of: i

A Chairperson and three other members of the civilian faculty of the University; three

students to be nominated by the ASUO Senate; the senior officer of-the Air Force ROTC I

program; and the senior officer of the Army ROTC program. The civilian faculty members and the students are to be appointed by the President and will have full voting rights. The Chairperson is to be designated by the President and vote only when a tie vote is cast. The two senior officers are to be ex officio, non-voting members." ADJOURMMENT _ There being no further business the meeting adjourned at 4:05 p.m. Marshall D. Wattles Secretary of the Faculty

REGULAR MEETING OF THE FACULTY ~
UNIVERSITY OF OREGON i
March 1, 1978 '
The meeting was called to order by President William Boyd at 3:37 p.m. on March 1, 1978 ~

in room 150 Geology. ~- i
There being no corrections, the minutes of the meeting of February 8 were approved as 1:
distributed. ,
ANNOUNCEMENTS ~
~'UGI:NE IO[~mf~CO.' Mr. Joseph Hynes announced the appearance of Eugene Ionesco scheduled !
for Wednesday, March 18, at 2:30 p.m. This event is sponsored jointly by the French ~.

Cultural Service, Academic du Cinema, Romance Language Department, University Assemblies and Lectures Committee and the Cultural Forum.

Cf..RTiF-IC.\l`ION OP ~~VI~TFR~ TERM ¢2.~~~I3iU4:~~-.~~. Mr. Robert James was recognized to present the following.motiou: "That the faculty of the University of Oregon recommend that the Oregon State Board of Higher Edueation confer upon the persons whose names are included in the Official Degree List, as compiled and certified by the University Registrar after the March 10, 1978 Graduation Convocation, the degrees for which they have completed all requirements."

The motion was seconded, put to a vote and carried.

ROTC [`lOTIOIT. President Boyd announced that Mr. Andrew Thompson would not present his motion at this meeting of the Assembly.

FA¢~ULlY CUR.~`ICUT,tJlt^PESPQNSI~I~~TY. Pr.esident Boyd referred to the article in Oregon Week of Monday-, February 27 which asked this question: "Do University of OTegon faculty [ave any right or responsibility for considering a new administrative plan on the offering of an interinstitutional graduate degree?"

President Boyd said that the curriculum is totally the concern of the faculty and the administration will not act to erode that responsibility. The power to act on the curriculum is contained in the Charter of the University and that will be strictly followed by this administration.

President Boyd relinquished the Chair to Vice President Olum.

UNFINISHED BUSINESS

~~oM~OVA~ OFiINCQA~L~TE;-. Mr. Wi U iam Lamon was recognized to present the following motion: "That the legislation of April 5, T950, be amended as follows: "'To remove an incomplete, a student must complete the course within his/her next three terms of residence in the University, but no later than three calendar vears after the conclus~on of the course for which the incomplete was awarded, or at such earlier date as the instructor, dean or department head may specify.' This restriction does not apply to incompletes assigned pending completion of research pro~ects, these or terminal projects. This amendment to become effective begi_ning with grades reportab-le fall term, 1978."

The motion was seconded. Miss Catherine Jones reported the Senate vote on this mot~on was 24 in favor, 14 opposed and-no abstentions-. Following a brief statement by the Senate Reporter and comments by Mr. Lamon, Mr. Sanford Tepfer moved to amend as follows: "Any mark of incomplete not removed during the period prescribed above shall be converted automatically to a grade of 'F' or rN, depending upon the grade option that applies."

The motion to amend was seconded. Mr. John Sherwood offered the opinion that the amendment sufficiently changed the intent of the motion to require a notice of motion. The Chair ruled otherwise. The motion to amend was put to a vote and defeated. Mr. Paul Civin moved that the motion be referred back to the Senate for an assessment of the cost. The motion to refer was seconded, put to a vote and defeated. Mr. Robert Hurwitz moved to amend by removing "dean or department head" and inserting "or departmental policy." The motion to amend was seconded, put to a vote and defeated.

Following further discussion of the motion, Mr. Lewis Ward moved to amend by changing the time in residence £ollowing the completion of the course from three terms to four terms. Motion to amend was seconded, put to a vote and carried. Mr. Fred Andrews moved to amend by adding before the last sentence, "Accompanying each mark o£ 'I' there shall be filed with the department, college or school by the instructor, a statement setting forth the conditions under which the 'I' may be removed.'' The motion to amend was seconded. Mr. James Hoard raised the point of order regarding the relevancy of the proposed amendment to the motion. The Chairan ruled the amendment in order. The motion to amend was put to a vote and carried.

Mr. Ivan Niven moved the previous question; the motion to close debate was seconded, put to a vote and carried. The main motion as amended was put to a vote and carried.

(The legislation as approved is attached as Appendix A.)

TRl-~.,I`7ER5lTY d~C~~CR-¢3F:-+Li~,QA IO~ f~~.¢GRiEf-:. Mr. Joseph Hy+nes presented the following motion: ''That the proposal being circulated by the Dean of the Graduate School for the instituting and implementing of a Tri-University (University of Oregon, Oregon State University, Portland State University) Doctor of Education degree (Ed.D.) be formally discussed and acted upon by this Assembly."

The motion was seconded. Miss Catherine Jones reported that the Senate vote on this motion was four in favor, 27 opposed, and two abstaining. Following the report of the Senate Reporter and Mr. Hynes' explanation of the motion, the motion was discussed at length. Mr. Helmut Plant moved that "the" in the first sentence be replaced by "any." Following a brief discussion on this point, Mr. Sanford Tepfer moved the previous question on the amendment and the main motion. The motion to close debate was seconded, put to a vote and carried. The amendment was put to a vote and following a division the vote was announced as a tie, 35 in favor, 35 against. The Chair ruled the motion had failed. The main motion was put to a vote and carried.

(The legislation as adopted is appended to these minutes.)

NEW 8USINESS ~
P`OTC INSTRUCTIOh=AL ',TAPF. Mr. Andrew Thompson offered the following notice of motion: I
"Appointment Procedures for ROTC Instructional Staff. That the faculty recommend to the
President that commissioned officers who are candidates for appointment to instruetional
positions on the ROTC staff [continue to] be proposed [as at present,] by the Department
of the Army and the Department of the Air Force to the senior officer of the appropriate
ROTC program at the University, who [shall make the initial decision as to the nomineeis
acceptability for the position. If he approves the nominee, he] shall be responsible
for assembling a file of academic and professional credentials for the candidate.
The ROTC Advisory Committee and the Department Head shall make separate, independent
recommendations regarding the ranking of the candidates, wh~ch recommendations are to be
forwarded to the President. The faculty recommends to the President that appointments
to the ROTC instructional staff, other than appointments to the Department Heads, need
not be extended only to regular or reserve members of the armed forces, but may be extended
to any other qualified persons. [Beginning in 1973-74, the senior officers shall submit
the credentials of nominees to such administrative officer as may be designated by the
President.] As required by prior faculty legislation (May 20, 1970), all nominees to the
position of senior officer in either the Army ROTC program or th'~ Air Force ROTC program
shall be required to visit the University campus for an interview before they may be
appointed. If a nominee for appointment to this position is abroad at the time he is
proposed, his nomination shall not be considered by the University until he has returned
to this country, at which time he shall be requested to come to the campus for an inter-
view. Failure of a candidate to comply with the requirement for an on-site interview
shall be considered sufficient grounds for the University to decline the nomination.
(The bracheted material to be deleted, the underlined to be added.)
C4M~tlS-+[IDt. CO}~.fITT£E.S. Mr. Robert Hurwitz offered the following notice of motion:
"That an ad hoc committee be appointed and charged with examining alternatives to the f
current method of electing members to campus-wide committees and that the committee ft
report back to the Assembly at the May meeting." f
Vice President Olum relinquished the Chair to President Boyd. ~
STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY i
President Boyd stated that he wished to comment on three issues. ~
S[BA~Y I;4C:~ASE.S: He discussed the salary improvement funds now being distributed. ~ ,}
The State Board authorized 14 per cent increase which for the biennium will amount to ~
about 14.66 per cent when compunded. The State Board established guidelines which fi+
directed these funds be used for merit, promotion, inequities and for aeross-the board ,}
adjustments for satisfactoryservice.
The University established the following procedures in its distribution plan. At
the beginning of this academic year there was an across-the-board increase of 4.25 per
cent for all who had performed satisfactorily; 0.75 was available for promotion and
equity adjustments. As of April 1 the 4 per cent available is being distributed on
the basis of merit. Each administrative unit receives 4 per cent with the authority to
distribute according to prescribed guidelines established for the University. We assume
that the adjustments recommended by the Deans will be the final decisions. The next
increase, 5 per cent, will be made in Deeember, 1978. There will be a one-step increase
(approximately 3 per cent) for all faculty members who have performed satisfactorily.
The remainder will be distributed on the basis of merit and equity.
_:ALARY SAVI~-l6S: President Boyd explained the problem of salary savings and why the pro-
cedures that have been used have not permitted a self-funding of the salary plan. He
went on to say that the plan to save $300,000 necessitated by budget constraints will
be carried out through vacant positions, retirements and resignation and not by placing
a freeze on vacant positions as has been reported in the press.
l

LISRAR-Y: President Boyd addressed the problems of the Library and said that we have to -'~
look ahead and decide what a major researeh library should be like now and in the future
and what changes are necessary in order to provide that library. Thought has been given
to a centralized state library facility but this has been opposed by some faculty members.
Therefore, to bring order to our thinking on this he is doing two things; 1) a symposium
will be held late this Spring at which experts on libraries will discuss the directions *
we should move in the future, and 2) acting on the recommendation of the Library Committee,
an ad hoc faculty committee will be appointed to report to the President and the faculty ..
on what should be done. In the meantime, the President will resist changes until this f
study has been completed.
ADJOURNMENT f

There being no further business the meeting was adjourned at 5:15 p.m. Marshall D. Wattles Secretary of the Faculty

28I APPENDIX A REMOVAL OF INCOMPLETES

To remove an incomplete, a student must complete the course within his/her next four terms of residence in the University, but no later than three calendar years after the conclusion of the course for which the incomplete was awarded, or at such earlier date as the instructor, dean or department head may speci ~ does not apply to incompletes assigned pending completion of research Projects, theses, or terminal Rrojects. Accompanying each mark of 'I' there shall be filed with the department, college or school by the instructor, a statement setting forth the conditions under whict the 'I' may be removed. This amendment to become effectiv-e beginning with

_i TRI-VNIVERSITY DOCTOR OF EDUCATION DEGREE

That the proposal being circulated by the Dean of the Graduate School for the instituting and implementing of a Tri-University (University of Oregon, Oregon State University, Portland State University) Doctor of Education degree (Ed.D.) be formally discussed and acted upon by this Assembly.

REGULAR MEETING OF THE FACULTY

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON April 5, 1978

The meeting was called to order by President Boyd at 3:40 p.m. on April 5, 1978 in room 150 Geology.

The minutes of the March 7 meeting of the Assembly were corrected by the Secretary as follows: The Senate vote on page under Tri University Doctor of Education degree, second paragraph should have read "30 in favor, none opposed, and five abstaining." In the same paragraph, next to the last sentence should read: "The Chair ruled the motion to amend had failed to receive a majority."

There being no further corrections the minutes of March 7 were approved as amended.

ANNOUNCEMENTS AND REPORTS

PIrN;Ess ~i`D Fb"N. Mr. Jack Adler announced that the Department of Physical Education is reinstituting the 'fitness and fun' sessions for faculty at 1600 Tuesdays and Thursdays. This will ihvolve exercises of various kinds, 1600 to 1630 and volleyball from 1630 on. The sessions will be held in the west gymnasium of Esslinger Hall and are open to male and female faculty.

ACADF.,fLC Sl.~NDARDS COMMI~-TE;E REPOf(~. Mr. George Struble presented the report of the Aeademic Standards Co ~ ittee. This report is attached to these minutes.

-

CG,-~hEGTIVE ~sAt-(GAINl7NG~ Mr. Marshall Wattles reported on the progress of collective bargaining between the Graduate Teaching Fellows Federation and the Vniversity. A copy of that report is attached to these minutes.

President Boyd requested Provost Paul Olum to assume the Chair.

UNFINISHED BUSINESS

FOTf. I:h~7S RU-i~IfO;M Mr. Andrew Thompson presented the following motion:

"Appointment procedures for ROTC instructional Staff. That the faculty recommend to the President that commissioned officers who are candidates for appointment to instructional positions on the ROTC staff [continue to] be proposed [as at present] by the department of the Army and the department of Air Force to the senior officer of the appropriate ROTC program at the University, who [shall make the initial decision as to the nominee's acceptability for the position. If he approves the nominee, he] shall be responsible for assembling the files of academic and professional credentials for the candidates. The ROTC Advisory Committee and the department head (the senior officer of the appropriate ROTC program) shall make separate, independent recommendations re~arding the rankine of the candidates, which recommendations are to be forwarded to the President. The faculty recommends to the President that appointments to the ROTC instructional staff, other than appointments to the department heads, need not be extended only to regular or reserve members of the armed forces, but may be extended to any other qualified persons. [Beginning in 1973_74, the senior officers shall submit the credentials of nominees to such administrative officer as may be designated by the President.] As required by prior faculty legislation (May 20, 1970), all norinees to he position of Senior officer in either the Army ROTC program or the Air Force ROTC

program shall be required to visit the University campus for an interview before they may be appointed. If a nominee for appointment to this position is abroad at the time he is proposed, his nomination shall not be considered by the University until he has returned to this country, at which time he shall be requested to come to the campus for an interview. Failure of a candidate to comply with the requirement for an on-site interview shall be considered sufficient grounds for the University to decline the nomination. (The bracheted material to be deleted, the underlined to be added.)"

The motion was seconded, after which Miss Catherine Jones reported the vote of the University Senate as 22 in favor, 6 opposed and 2 abstentions. Following debate, Mr. William Loy moved to amend by deleting the proposed new language and substituting, "The appropriate senior officer shall submit the credentials of at least three nominees for each position." Following debate, the motion to amend was put to a vote and carried, 33 yes, 18 no.

Mr. Bernd Crasemann moved to table the motion. The Chair ruled that in view of the tradition of the faculty that the motion to table is a motion to suppress, two-thirds majority is required for adoption of this motion. The motion was seconded, put to a vote and carried, 46 in favor, 16 against.

COi\?fI'f~fEP. hEFfBE.RSlIlP. Mr. Andrew Thompson presented the following motion:

"That the legislation of January 10, 1973, pertaining to the standing ROTC committee be amended as follows: The standing ROTC Advisory Committee is to consist of: A Chairperson to be designated by the President from the civilian faculty of the University; the senior officer of the Army ROTC program; the senior officer of the Air Force ROTC program; three additional members appointed by the President from the civilian faculty; threa students who are recommended by the ASUO Committee on Committees and appointed by the President. All membersof the Committee shall have voting rights except the chairperson, who will vote only when a tie vote has been cast, and the two senior officers.

Following a second, Miss Catherine Jones reported the Senate vote on this motion was 16 in favor, 13 against and no abstentions. The motion was put to a vote and defeated.

CAMPUS-~.VIDE COM~fITTEES. Mr. Robert Hurwitz presented the following motion:

"That an Ad Hoc committee be appointed and charged with examining alternatives to the current method of conducting faculty elections and that the committee report back t-o the Assembly at the May meeting."

The motion was second. Mr. Catherine Jones reported the University Senate vote on this motion was 26 in favor, 2 against, and one abstention. Following a brief discussion, the motion was put to a vote and defeated, 14 in favor, 28 against.

NEIV BUSINESS

COURSE EV.ALUATlONS. Mr. Paul Holbo presented the following notice of motion:

"That the legislation of November 5 and December 3, 1975, and as amended June 2, 1976
concerning course evaluation questionnaires, Part I, be amended as follows:
"a) a new section l shall be added as follows: 'That course evaluation questionnaires
shall be administered for and required of all faculty once a year in representative courses
they teach;'
b) the present section 1 shall become section 2;
c) a new section 3 shall be added as follows: 'that administrators of each department or
minor faculty shall also prepare a course evaluation survey report of their unit, including
size of classes, number of respondents per class, percentage distribution of such responses
per class, and departmental or unit comparisons; this information shall be available for
administrative and evaluative purposes;'
d) the present section 2 shall be replaced by the following and labeled section 4; 'that
course evaluation questionnaires shall contain

I) a brief portion that can be tabulated concerning significant features of the course and the instruction, and

2) a space for open-ended comments,'
e) the present section 3 shall become section 5;
f) the present section 4 shall become section 6 and be amended by striking the last clause
and substituting therefore the following: 'and necessary steps be taken to ensure that
no person responds to more than one questionssaire for each class in which he or she is ,
enrolled and in which a questionnaire is administered;'
g) the present section 5 shall become section 7 and be changed as follows: 'that the
preparation and use of all materials collected shall be in accord with established
student records policy;'
h) that all subsequent sections of the present legislation be given the appropriate number
changes; ie, section 6 shall become 8, section 7 become 9, etc."

.~S~13VI OF AP,3:;COtEiCI~. Mr. Fred Mohr presented the following notice of motion on behalf of Mr. Robert Harris: "A Museum of Art Advisory Committee shall be established as a faculty committee beginning with fall term,1978. The primary purpose of the Committee shall be to promote the educational and research activities of the Museum in concert with University programs. In addition the Committee will advise the director of the Museum on general program policies. The Committe will consist of 8 to 10 faculty members representing the visual and performing arts and other areas of the University, 3 student members, and the direcotr of the Museum of Art (ex officio)."

JOl.~~~t DECiREESi Miss Diane Reinhard presented the following notice of motion: ''At the ne~t ~eeting of this Assembly the College of Education will present affd seek approval for offering jointly with Portland State University and Oregon State University two doctoral programs which have previously been approved by this faculty."

ADJOURNMENT

There being no further business the meeting was adjourned at 1710.

M~rshall D. Wattles Secretary of the Faculty

REGULAR MEETING OF THE FACULTY UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

May 3, 1978

The meeting was called to order by President William Boyd at 1535 on May 3, 1978 in room 150 Geology.

The minutes of the meeting of April 5, 1978 of the Assembly were approved as distributed.

ANNOUNCEMENTS, REPORTS AND MEMORIALS -

MI'TCl DIeTERICr MEMORIAL. Mr. Francis Bittner presented a memorial for Mr. Milton Dieterich who died in December 1977. Mr. Dieterich served the University in the School of Music from 1945 to 1964. The text of the memorial is included on pages 6-7 of these minutes.

ELECTION RPSULTS. President Boyd announced the results of the faculty election as follows: Advisory Council: two-year terms, Paul Holbo, Stoddard Malarkey, Clarence (Dick) Schminke and Shirley Wilson; one-year terms, Phyllis Ford, Wanda Johnson, Richard Littman and Arnulf Zweig. Faculty Personnel Committee: two-year terms, Exine Bailey, Phyllis Ford, Stoddard Malarkey and Clarence (Dick) Schminke; one-year terms, Charles Duncan, Benton Johnson, Ray Lowe and Edna Wooten.

~BPORT ()~ Tlin COij\+rCIT, FOR ~~I:.f)rITY F;JUCATION. Mr. Myron kothbart was recognized to present a report for the Council for Minority Education. The text of this report is included in these minutes on pages 8-9.

AdADEMIC REOUiREME'4TS CO~~l~~r^EE. Mr. RDbert James reported the Academic Requirements Committe~ wishes to inform the Assembly: "That in order to accommodate what we believe to be deficiencies in the present grading system we will approve the graduation of those students whose records indicate that they might graduate if some of the grades received were changed to F. We regard this to be an interim measure, pending a more general review of the grading system which the committee will recommend in its final report. Our purpose here is to encourage the faculty that they assign the appropriate grade for work completed in their classes and refer students to the petitioning process rather than entertaining any idea of changing grades from D to F as a way of getting around the ninety percent rule."

President Boyd relinquished the Chair to Vice President Olum.

UNFINISHED BUSINESS '

~ITOR.S,E.~~-~VALCATIO.i MT. Paul Holbo presented the following motion: "That the legis-
lation of November 5 and December 3, 1975, and as amended June 2, 1976, concerning
course evaluation questionnaires, Part I, be amended as follows:
"a) a new section l shall be added as follows: 'That course evaluation questionnaires
shall be administered for and required of all faculty once a year in representative
courses they teach;'
b) the present section l shall become section 2;
c) a new section 3 shall be added as follows: 'That administrators of each depart-
ment or minor faculty shall also prepare a course evaluation survey report of their
unit, including size of classes, number of respondents per class, percentage distri-
bution of such responses per class, and a comparison of departmental or unit faculty
ratings; this information shall be available tD authorized administrators and committees.
d) the present section 2 shall be replaced by the following and labeled section 4;
'That course evaluation questionnaires shall contain

1) a portion that can be tabulated concerning significant features of the course and the instruction, and -

2) a space for open-ended comments;'

e) the present section 3 shall become section 5;
f) the present section 4 shall become section 6 and be amended by striking the last clause
and substituting therefor the following: 'And necessary steps be taken to ensure that no
person responds to more than onq questionnaire for each class in which he or she is
enrolled and in which a questionnaire is administered;'
g7 the present section 5 shall be deleted; a new section 7 shall be added as follows:
'That the preparation and use of all materials collected shall be in accord with estab-
lished faculty records policy;'
h) that all subsequen* sections of the present legislation be given the appropriate
number changes; ie, section 6 shall become 8, section 7 become 9, etc."

Following a second to the motion, Ms. Catherine Jones reported the Senate vote as 11

in favor, 16 against and 3 abstaining. After a brief discussion and a report of the |
Senate Reported, Ms. Marilyn Farwell moved that the motion be referred to the Ad Hoc i

Committee on Stud-ent Evaluations of Courses. The motion to refer was seconded. Ms. Catherine Jones reported that the Senate vote on the motion to refer was 17 in favor, 12 against and 1 abstaining. Following a brief debate the motion to refer was adopted, 45 in favor, 39 against.

-!YdJSEU'~f(~F A`1T C()UitcIL. Mr. Norman Sundberg presented the following motion: "That a Museum of Art Advisory Committee shall be established as a faculty committee beginning with fall term,1978. The primary purpose of the committee shall be to promote the educational and research activities of the Museum in concert with University programs. In addition the committee will advise the Director of the Museum on general prgram policies. The committee shall make annual reports and recommendations to the faculty. The committee will consist of 8 to 10 faculty members representing the visual and performing arts and other areas of the University, 3 student members,and the Director of the Museum of Art (ex officio)."

Following a second, Ms. Catherine Jones, Secretary of the Senate, presented the Senate vote as 27 in favor, none against, and no abstentions.

Mr. Helmut Plant moved to amend by inserting "and coordinate" after the word "promote" in the third line. Mr. John Sherwood moved the previous question. The motion to close debate was put to a vote and adopted by the necessary two-thirds majority, The amendment was put to a vote and defeated. The main motion was put to a vote and carricd.

JOI-~!~T DEG+RErEs. Ms. Dianne Reinhard was recognized to present the following motion: "That the faculty approve a joint doctoral program in educational administration (Ed.D.) with Portland State University and a cooperative doctoral program in community college education (Ed.D.) with Portland State University and Oregon State Universityj as pro. posed by the College of Education. (These two programs have been approved and are presently offered as independent programs on the University of Oregon campus.)"

Following a second the Secretary of the University Senate gave the vote of the

Senate as 25 in favor, none against, and no abstentions. After a brief discussion the i

Chair asked unanimous consent to remove from the motion, the last sentence of the motion.
There being no objection the sentence was removed. Mr. Charles Duncan moved to amend by
adding the provision "that the programs be reviewed at the end of three years by the
University Curriculum Committee.~' The motion to amend was seconded. Foilowing a brief
discussion Mr. Duncan asked unanimous consent to change "the University Curriculum
Committee" to "Graduate Council." There was no objection. The amandment was put to a
vote and carried* The motion as amended was put to a vote and carried. The legislation
as approved is as follows:
"That the faculty approve a joint doctoral program in educational administration
(Ed.D.) with Portland State University and a cooperative doctoral program in community
college education (Ed.D.) with Portland State University and Oregon State University,
as proposed by the College of Education. The programs are to be reviewed at the end of
three years by the Graduate Council."
CERtIErCK,Iof~r C)r SPP~~~G;A,.~~.,biA~~~:3 ORADuATES. Mr.; Robert James moved as follows: "That
the faculty of~the University of Oregon recommend that the Oregon State Board of Higher 7
Education confer upon the persons whose names are included in the Official Degree List,
as compiled and certified by the University Registar after the 3une 11, 1978 and the
August 12j 1978 Graduation Convocations, the degrees for which they have completed all '
requirements."
The motion was seconded, put to a vote and carried.
NEW BUSINESS 7

ELECTIOI: PROCEPU"~S. Mr. Charles Duncan gave the following motion: "In the event that a member of:the faculty is nominated for both the Advisory Council and the Faculty Personnel Committee, the Secretary of Faculty will so notify that person and ascertain on which of the two ballots the nominne wishes his/her name to appear."

UNIVERSITY FI'EC~~~~lS. Mr. RobeTt Hurwitz presented the fQllawing nQtice of motion: "That beginning with the Fall term of 1978, campus-wide elections aimed at filing faculty positions Qn university committees be conducted and tallied according to the Modified Hare single transferrable vote system."

R~liG APPRECIATIC!7 RESe3LIfflON. Mr. John Sherwood presented the following notice of motiQn: "On the occasion of the withdrawal of the Air Force ROTC from the University of Oregon, the Assembly wishes to thank pTesent and former officers for their services and to commend their patient endurance of liberal rhetoric and radical violence.'7

Vice President Olum relinguished the Chair to President Boyd.

STATE OF THE UNIVERSITY

President Boyd said there were five subjects on which he would report briefly to
the faculty.
1. Collective Bargaining. The President has been urged by some to make a statement
in response to the position taken publicly by the Union concerning issues involved in
the Union negotiations. Some may incorrectly interpret silence on the part of the
administration as concurrence in the allegations but he views conciliation as more
important now than attempting to straighten out the record. Consequently he has
decided not to respond to the allegations and hopes that the differences can be worked
out during collective bargaining and that contracts will soon be signed with both
groups with whom the University is negotiating.
2. Budget Preparation. He pointed out that an important part of our budget request
is the so-called program improvement. We have been limited in what we can request to
one per cent of the state appropriated part of our educational budget which comes to
just under $900,000. He named the areas that have been included and the priorities in
our program improvement request.

(1) An interdisciplinary program in neuroscience. We are asking the state to support two faculty appointments plus support and classified assistance, which will be in addition to three appointments that ara to be made from resources already under the command of the institution.

(2) Pre-registration system. Having a pre-registration we can have both a better university and at the same time a better supported one.

(3) School of Music. The teaching load in the School of Music is higher than comparable institutions and some program weaknesses result from spreading our faculty too thinly.

(4) Title IX. We are asking for program improvement to help us achieve equity under Title IX.

(5) Gerontology. We are requesting faculty positions that would permit us to expand services to the aged population, to support educational programs in the su'oject matter appropriate to Gerontology and to support basic research in that area. 3. Capital Construction. We have requested for the next biennium eighteen items totall~ng $34,305,000. Twelve of the eighteen are buildings which included state funding. Although we have no expectation of getting eighteen items funded in a single session of the legislative assembly, it is a way to state our needs. At a recent meeting of the Board the President found that two of the items that we had hoped to have included were not included in the staff work of the Chancellor's Office. The things not included were the addition to our Library and the second phase of the facilities for the College of Education. As a consequence of the Presidentts request that Board has instructed its staff to enlarge the list so that it more correctly reflects the needs of this system. He said that we have good reason to hope that one or two of our items will be added to that list. 4. Graduate Education. President Boyd called attention to the budget note in the last legislature suggesting that we are not being tough enough in cutting back on graduate education. The system was instructed to make a study to report to the Oregon Educational Coordinating Commission by May 1 of this year, and that eommission will then report to the legislature itself.

The Chancellor appointed a committee of distinguished lay peopla to make the study. The committee was head by Dr. Jean Mater, manager of a Corvallis engineering firm. The President read sections of this report to the faculty and pointed out that the committee's report seemed to be compatible with the objectives of the University. 5. Continuing Education. The President referred to a document presented for study entitled "Toward an ~institutionally based system of continuing education." The name suggests the further dismantling of DCE. The study implies a movement in the direction of giving substantial autonomy to the various institutions in the system. We are trying to resist being looked at in any respect as a regional institution and in that stance we are joined by OregUn State.

An important part of what is being recommended is that the legislature stop discriminating against people who are place-bound by forcing'their education to be unsubsidized by state appropriations, and recommendations will be carried forward that continuing education be funded on the same subsidized basis that the regular education is funded. He pointed out that we too discriminate on grounds of residency requirements which may pose greater barriers to students than high tuition in some cases' We have a responsibility not to have residency requirements where they are not j

related to sound education for quality reasons and hopes that all of us will examine these requirements. He concluded by saying, "I hope that now that the control is increasingly coming to the campus that we will be aggressive even evangelical in efforts to design educational programs that will make the resourcesof this university more available to more people throughout the state." ADJOURNMENT The meeting was adjourned at 1730.

Marshall D. Wattles ~
Secretary of the Faculty |

MILTON DIETERICH, 1902-1977. Milton Dieterich, Professor of Music was born in 1902 at Marengo, Iowa, and died in December 1977 at Eugene, Oregon after a-prolonged illness which had necessitated early retirement in 1964. The second of three children, Milton was to become the only professional musician in the family. However, all three Dieterich children played instruments, participating in small church ensembles. Their lives were tightly knit with their church involvement, which was originally the German Methodist Church. In addition to musical talent, Milton was gifted in public speaking, participating in debate and speaking cpntests. He studied both piano and violin before the 'cello became the central spark of his musical career. The optimism that shone through his entire life was demonstrated in his youth by the aftermath of a bowling game. A severely bruised hand led to blood poisoning, the situation becoming serious enough to threaten the hand. Asked what he would do if he could no longer play the 'cello, Milton's unhesitating reply was, "Then I'll do something else!"

He received the baccalaureate degree from Grinell College in 1923, and in 1924 took his first teaching position at the University of Oklahoma at Norman. In addition to teaching 'cello and several music courses, he was active as 'cellist in small ensembles and the University orchestra, which he directed in alternate years. He organized a young people's symphony which gained wide recognition through regular radio performances and public concerts. After leaving the University of Oklahoma, he taught briefly at the University of Iowa, and then accepted a position as Professor of Music at Bemidji State Teachers College (now Bemidgi State College) at Bemidji, Minnesota. During this period, Milton pursued graduate studies, receiving the Master of MOsic degree from the Eastman School of Music at Rochester, New York, in 1941. In 1943, he joined the World War II effort as a U.S.O. director, serving in several states. Typically, he thoroughly enjoyed making "a home away from home" for the servicemen.

Upon separation from the armed services in 1945, Milton was called to the University of Oregon as Assistant Professor of Music ('cello and music theory). Within a nucleus of faculty emanating from the Eastman school of Music, he helped develop and solidify the program of music theory here. He immediately became a member of the University String Quartetj composed, in addition, of Professors George Boughton, violin, and Edmund Cykler, viola, and Mary Alton violin, wife of Professor Donald AIton. The quartet was a mainstay inthe life of the Music School, and was many times a cultural representative for the University throughout the state. Milton taught with skill and understanding in the studio with individual 'cello students, in the classroom, and with small chamber ensembles. He was of course principal 'cellist of the Eugene Symphony Orchestra. In the community, he served as choirmaster and organist at St. 14ary's Episcopal Church for over fifteen years. A skilled and prolific composer, Milton's creative efforts centered in the church. By the time of his retirement, he had composed over 350 anthems, a great number of which had been published.

His concern and caring for others was a driving force throughout his life. He devot¢d untold hours to advising and counseling students. He paid heed to the needs and concerns of young people outside campus life. Not infrequently a total stranger was to feel the brush of his compassion. Thus it was that student, faculty and colleague, and townsperson alike came to know him as beloved teacher, colleague and friend.

,, .

Respectfully submitted, Francis W. Bittner Professor Emeritus of Music

Mr. Chairman, I move that this memorial be entered in the permahent record of this meeting and copies be sent to the family of our departed colleague.

237 REGULAR MEETING OF THE FACULTY UNIVERSITY OP OREGON June 7, 1978

The meeting was called to order by President William Boyd at 1535 on June 7, 1978 in Room 150 Geology.

The minutes of the May meeting had been distributed. Mr. Stanley Greenfield asked that the minutes be corrected as follows: On page 1 under Unfinished Business the first motion should read, "Mr. Holbo presented, on behalf of Mr. Stanley Greenfield and himself, the following motion." The minutes as corrected were approved.

ANNOUNCEMENTS, REPORTS AND MEMORIALS

JAlslE T.~4LC]TER I~EAMOI!~AL Mr. Edmund Cykler presented a memorial for Mrs. Jane Thacher who died Mareh 16, 1978. Mrs. Thacher served as head of the music school's piano department during part of her University of Oregon career from 1917 to 1950. The text of the memorial is included on page 4 of these minutes.

.

CORNAROAWARD. President Boyd, with the assistance of Ms. Judith Merkle,+ presented the Cornaro Award to Professor Rosaria Hodgdon. He also presented certificates to Ms. Mavis Mate and Ms. Marilyn Farwell who were designated as distinguished alternates.

RESUI:;~S OF SPEGlAL PEE.£TIC)?I. President Boyd announced the result Qf the special electio-n required because of three resignations from the Faculty Advisory Council. This has resulted in a re-alignment of two-year and the one-year terms of service for 1978-79. The following faculty members make up the new Advisory Council: Twoyear terms-- Paul Holbo, Wanda Johnson, Shirley Wislon, Arnulf Zweig. Cne-year terms-- Richard Littman, David Povey, Diane Reinhard, Donald Tull.

~EPG~~-~ OF T-~~ EACt3L~~ PEP.+SC~.~!-.-7El. COMMI'(TEE. Mr. Charles Duncan presented the report of the.Facul-ty Personnel Committee. The text of the report is included in the minutes of this meeting on pages 5-7.

PLyOF~ OP ~:E F~5.C:UI:~rY A:~\fI'SORY COAYh~~~iTElE. Mr. Richard Littman presented the report of the Faculty Advisory Council. The text of the report is included on pages 8-12 of these minutes.

F1CU~:Y RETIl{EMEI-IT A13 ~-f3(, Gof~~4TlTEF IR`EPC)~~. Mr. Paul Swadener, Chairman of the Ad Hoc Committee on Faculty Retirement stated that the committee report would be included in the minutes of this faculty meeting. It is attached on page 13-16.

UNFINISHED BUSINESS

ELECTIOIN PROCEDUR~C7. Mr. Charles Duncan moved "In t.he event that a member of the faculty is nominated for both the Advisory Council and the Faculty Personnel Committee, the Secretary of the Faculty will so notify that person and ascertain on which of the two ballots the nominee wishes his/her name to appear."

The motion was seconded. Ms. Catherine Jones, Secretary of the University Senate, reported the Senate vote of 23 in favor, 1 against and 3 abstentions.

In the discussion on this motion, Mr. Duncan presented the interpretation that passing this motion would not preclude a person from serving on both committees if they were nominated and wished to serve on both. Mr. Clarence Thurber moved to amend by adding, "It is the sense of the faculty that a faculty member should not normally serve on both bodies simultaneously."

The amendment was put to a vote and carried. The motion as amended was put to a vote and carried. The legislation as approved is a follows: "In the event that a member of the faculty is nominated for both the Advisory Council and the Faculty Personnel Committee, the Secretary of the Faculty will so notify that person and ascertain on which of the two ballots the nominee wishes his/her name to appear. It is the sense of the faculty that a faculty member should not normally serve on both bodies simultaneously."

iUNIVEQ.SITY ELECTIO.~`S. Mr. Robert Hurwitz presented the following motion: "That beginning with the Fall term of 1978, or as soon as feasible, campus-wide elections aimed at filling faculty positions on university committees be conducted and tallied according tQ the Modified Hare single transferrable vote system."

The motion was seconded, after which Ms. Catherine Jones presented the Senate vote on this motion as 21 in favor, 4 against and 3 abstentions. During debate Mr. George St-ruble stated that he would like to move "That the election procedure used in f-aculty elections shall be changed so that, 1) a voter may vote for any number of candidates in an election, but not more than the number to be elected, 2) on the second ballot in any election, the candidates receiving the highest number of votes are elected. Ties are resolved by chance." Mr. Struble said that he believed such a motion would be out of order. However, Mr. Stanley Greenfield moved to substitute the motion that Mr. Struble felt was out of order for the Hurwitz motion. The Chairman accepted the substitute motion as in order. The substitute was seconded; the motion to substitute was put to a vote and carried. The main motion as amended by the substitute motion was put to a vote and carried.

RQTC. Mr. John Sherwood moved, "On the occasion of the withdrawai of the Air Force ROTC from the University of Oregon, the Assembly wishes to thank present and former officers for their services and to commend their patient endurance of liberal rhetoric and radical violence."

The motion was seconded, after which Ms. Catherine Jones, Secretary of the Univer- '

sity Senate, reported that the motion was defeated in the Senate by a vote of 7 for, 21 against and no abstentions. Mr. Ronald Rousseve moved that the motion be amended by deleting all the words after "services." Ms. Catherine Jones reported that if the amendment is adopted the Senate favors the motion by a vote of 14 in favor, 6 against, and 7 abstentions. The motion to amend was put to a vote and carried. The motion as amended was put to a vote and carried. The legislation as approved is as follows: "On the occasion of the withdrawal of the Air Force ROTC from the University of Oregon, the Assembly wishes to thank present and former officers for their services." NEW BUSINESS

_ _ .

FAGULTY PF.RSO~~.~..TEL COF~IW~E. Mr. Stanley Greenfield reported that he would present the following motion at the next faculty meeting: "That only regular faculty with academic departmental or college appointments of 0.5 FTE or more be eligible to serve on the Faculty Personnel Committee. (Regular excludes Adjunct, Visiting and Courtesy appointments.)"

A*CADEMIC REQ17IREMEIv~TS COMMITTEE. Mr. Robert James presented the following notice of motion: "On behalf of the Academic Requirements Committee, at the next faculty meeting of the Assembly I will move to adjust the grading system by returning to the GPA for all graded work and to enforce the 85 per cent rule for all pass/no pass work."

ADJOURNMENT _

The meeting was adjourned at 1725. i

.

Marshall D. Wattles Secretary of the Faculty

JANE THACHER, 1885-1978. The death of Jane Thacher on March 15, 1978 was a severe loss not only to the musical community of the University of Oregon and Eugene but to the State of Oregon as well. Jane and her late husband, Goodwin Thacher, Professor Emeritus of Journalism, were associated with the University for a period of over sixty years having joined the University community in 1915. Jane was appointed to the School of Music faculty as professor of piano in 1917. As a young girl she had studied in Vienna with Theodor Leschetizky the teacher of such celebrated pianists as Paderewski, Schnabel and Garbrilovitsch. Through her many years of activity as a teacher and artist per£ormer she had remained true to the tradition of the great pianistic virtuosi and composers of ' the nineteenth century. Hundreds of devoted students were the recipients of this great tradition through Jane's instruction.

But Jane was also well known as an artist performer having appeared in solo recitals, in chamber music concerts with her colleagues, and in solo performances with orchestra throughout her many years of activity not only in Eugene but throughout the State of Oregon. Her retirement in 1950 was not marked by a cessation of performance. I can personally recall at least three public farewell concerts in the years that followed, and she kept playing on her beloved instrument in her home until a few months preceeding her death.

Jane will live in the memory of her friends, colleagues and students as a musical j
artistocrat--a'lady of affectionate consideration to all who knew her. |
Respectfully submitted, ' |

Edmund Cykler Professor Emeritus of Music Mr. Chairman, I move that this memorial be entered in the permanent record of this meeting

and 'copies be sent to the daughter of our departed colleague.


Web page spun on 10 July 2004 by Peter B Gilkey 202 Deady Hall, Department of Mathematics at the University of Oregon, Eugene OR 97403-1222, U.S.A. Phone 1-541-346-4717 Email:peter.gilkey.cc.67@aya.yale.edu of Deady Spider Enterprises