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Discussion of 7-point Expertise Scale

This section discusses the scale points on the 7-point expertise scale used throughout this Website.

 

Novice; a Beginner

Very Low

Average Current Teacher

ISTE NETS for Teachers

Well Qualified School Computer Coordinator

Well Qualified School District Computer Coordinator

National or World Class

 

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Novice; a Beginner

Children are novices or beginners at the time they encounter each new thing in their environment. It is not surprising that children can learn to use ICT systems well before they begin to learn to read and write. Most young children have little trouble learning to point and click and follow the pictures and oral instructions given in age-appropriate games. Young children can learn the rudiments of word processing at the same time that they are learning to read and write.

Nowadays, almost all students receive a substantial introduction to computers well before they complete high school. This introduction may be informal, through games, self instruction, and peer instruction. It may also be formal, through instruction offered by their classroom teachers and computer specialists in their schools. In such settings, very few children experience significant difficulty moving beyond the Novice; a Beginner point on the 7-point scale.

However, occasionally a preservice teacher falls into the Novice; a Beginner category. This situation may occur, for example when a "non traditional" older person returns to school to pursue a teacher education program of study.

Very Low

The typical student currently graduating from high school has had a reasonable level of experience in using a word processor, Email, and a Web browser. They may have been self-taught, learned from their peers, or received a modest amount of formal instruction. Their level of knowledge and skills may be quite modest, even though it is useful to them. For example, it takes only a modest number of minutes of instruction and practice to begin to use a word processor like an "electronic typewriter with memory." Such a rudimentary level of knowledge and skill (even if the person is a skilled typist) does not begin to represent a working understanding of word processing and desktop publishing as discussed in Questions 1 and 2 of Self-assessment Instrument # 1.

Average Current Teacher

A teacher is faced by the need to deal with: 1) general purpose ICT tools, such as those that their students have learned and/or are quite capable of learning; 2) ICT as an aid to instruction and assessment; 3) ICT hardware and software that their students use and that they use; 4) ICT as part of the content of the disciplines the teacher teaches; and 5) ICT as an aid to personal professional productivity. Teachers vary widely in their knowledge and experience in using ICT within these areas. Probably the "average" (the mean) for current teachers is best described as Very Low in each of these five areas. However, the breadth of ICT knowledge and experience moves the average teacher above the typical person whose Very Low lies within a narrow range that mainly includes word processor, Email, and a Web browser.

ISTE NETS for Teachers

This discussion remains to be written.

This is a huge jump up the scale. ISTE standards for teachers cover six main areas:

... ... ...

Well Qualified School Computer Coordinator

This person:

  • Meets the ISTE NETS for teachers
  • Is an experienced and well qualified teacher
  • Has substantial knowledge and experience in detecting and correcting hardware, software, and connectivity problems.
  • Is skilled in teaching ICT to both teachers and students.

Well Qualified School District Computer Coordinator

This discussion remains to be written.

This person meets all of the requirements of a Well Qualified School Computer Coordinator. In addition, ……… (Works with school CCs, plans ICT at a district level, reports directly to the Superintendent, plans district wide inservices, etc.)

National or World Class

This discussion remains to be written.

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