Nicholas Malone, Ph.D.
Biological Anthropology
 
 
 
Education
2007
Ph.D. Biological Anthropology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR
Dissertation Title: The Socioecology of the Critically Endangered Javan Gibbon (Hylobates moloch): Assessing the Impact of Anthropogenic Disturbance on Primate Social Systems
 
2001
MS Exp. Psychology: Primate Behavior, Central Washington University, Ellensburg, WA
Distinguished Thesis Nominee 2001: Displaced Hylobatids: The Biological, Cultural, and Economic Aspects of Primate Trade in Java and Bali, Indonesia
 
1997
BA Anthropology, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO
 
 
Research Interests
 
Hominoid evolution; nonhuman primate biology and socioecology; conservation; ecological communities; human relationships to nonhuman animals and the environment; Hylobatidae; Javan gibbons (Hylobates moloch); West Java, Indonesia; pygmy chimpanzees or bonobos (Pan paniscus); Democratic Republic of Congo
 
 
Professional Positions
 
2009-present
Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Notre Dame.
 
2007-present
Adjunct Professor, Department of Anthropology, Oregon State University.
 
2007-2008
Research Associate, Institute of Cognitive and Decision Sciences, University of Oregon.
 
2007-2008
Post-Doctoral Research Assistant, Lomako Forest Bonobo Project, Dem. Rep. of Congo. Post-doctoral supervisor: Dr. Frances J. White (PI: NSF Grant BCS-0610233). Coordinate data collection and analysis, training of field assistants, and conservation outreach activities related to research on the socioecology of pygmy chimpanzees, or bonobos (Pan paniscus).
 
 
2006-2007
Doctoral Research Fellow, University of Oregon.
The fellowship program provides financial support for exceptional doctoral candidates as they complete their research and the writing of their dissertations. These fellowships are designed to support outstanding doctoral students and promote excellence in research at the University of Oregon.
 
2005-2006
Homer J. Barnett Teaching Fellow, Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon.
 
2002-2006
Graduate Teaching Fellow, University of Oregon
Teaching Fellowships at the University of Oregon typically involve the direct instruction of approximately 80-100 students per quarter, once per week, in either discussion or laboratory sections.
 
2002-Present
Founding Director, Northwest Primate Conservation Society (NWPCS)
Oversee the development and fundraising priorities for a regional academic society. Major responsibilities include the coordination and assessment of all the society’s programs, including: fundraising, the Daniel E. Fischer Conservation Grant program, the educational outreach program, and maintaining the website: http://www.uoregon.edu/~nwpcs.
 
2002
Grant Writer, Central Washington University Foundation.
Responsible for the preparation and submission of proposals for private funding in support of CWU faculty, students, and programs.
 
2001-2002
Adjunct Lecturer of Anthropology, Central Washington University.
 
1999-2001
Research Assistant, Central Washington University, Full-time Position.
Responsibilities include noninvasive behavioral studies of captive chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) behavior, the development and implementation of an environmental enrichment program, and the teaching of laboratory techniques to undergraduate interns.
 
 
Professional Publications
 
Malone, N.  (In Prep.) Invited Article: 2008 Year in Review: Biological Anthropology. American Anthropologist.
 
Malone, N.M., White, F.J., Nyamaloola, I.B., Bofaso, M., Waller, M.T. (In Prep.) Conservation and conflict in a Congolese village: the social impacts of long-term primate research on local communities. American Anthropologist.
 
Malone, N.M., White, F.J. (In Revision) The socioecology of Javan gibbons (Hylobates moloch): tests of competing hypotheses. International Journal of Primatology.
 
Malone, N., Fuentes, A. (In Press) The Ecology and Evolution of Hylobatid Communities: Proximate and Ultimate Considerations of Inter- and Intraspecific Variation. The Gibbons:  New Perspectives on Small Ape Socioecology and Population Biology. D. Whittaker & S. Lappan (Eds.). Series Title: Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects. Springer Academic Press.
 
Malone, N.M. (2008) Deriving a nature-politics from our perception(s) of nonhuman animals and the environment. Book Review: The Animals Reader: The Essential Classic and Contemporary Writings, L. Kalof and A. Fitzgerald (eds.). Organization and the Environment, 21(2), 215-217.
 
Malone, N.M. (2007) The Socioecology of the Critically Endangered Javan Gibbon (Hylobates moloch): Assessing the Impact of Anthropogenic Disturbance on Primate Social Systems. PhD dissertation, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR.
 
Longo, S.B., Malone, N.M. (2006) Meat, medicine, and materialism: a dialectical analysis of human relationships to nonhuman animals and the environment. Human Ecology Review, 13(2), 111-121.
 
Malone, N., Pakpahan, H., Wedana, M. (2006) Behavioral and ecological responses of silvery gibbons (Hylobates moloch) to severe habitat degradation in West Java, Indonesia. American Society of Primatology Bulletin, 30(3), 11-12.
 
Malone, N.M., Fuentes, A., Purnama, A.R., Adi Putra, I.M.W. (2004). Displaced Hylobatids: Biological, Cultural, and Economic Aspects of the Primate Trade in Java and Bali, Indonesia.  Tropical Biodiversity, 40(1), 41-49.
 
Malone, N. (2003). Conservation: the highest priority of the International Primatological Society. American Association of Physical Anthropology Newsletter, 4(1), 4-5.
 
Malone, N.M., Purnama, A.R, Wedana, M., & Fuentes, A. (2002).  Assessment of the sale of primates at Indonesian bird markets.  Asian Primates, 8(1-2), 7-11.
 
Fuentes, A., Malone, N., Sanz, C., Matheson, M.D., & Vaughan, L. (2002).  Conflict and post-conflict behavior in a small group of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).  Primates,43(3), 223-235.
 
Malone, N.M. (2000). Providing Arboreal Enrichment for Captive Chimpanzees.  The Shape of Enrichment, 9(2), 3-4.
 
Malone, N.M., Vaughan, L.L., Fuentes, A. (2000). The role of human caregivers in the post-conflict interactions of captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Laboratory Primate Newsletter, 39(1), 1-3.
 
Malone, N.M. (1998).  Providing orangutans with opportunities for arboreal behavior. The Shape of Enrichment, 7(4), 1-2.
 
Teaching Experience
 
Primary Instructor
 
University of Notre Dame
 
ANTH 30140: Primatology – Ecological, Evolutionary, and Conceptual Insights into the Human Species. This course will examine not only the diversity of nonhuman primate species, including their behavior, ecological context, and evolution, but also the importance and implication of primatology's role in understanding our own species. Primary Instructor: Nicholas Malone, Spring Semester 2009.
 
ANTH 10109: Introduction to Anthropology. An introduction to one of the most exciting of the social sciences. Anthropology helps answer some of the most basic questions about ourselves and others—How and why did humans evolve? How did human culture develop, and why do there appear to be so many differences between cultures? How did human communication come about? Is language understood only in terms of words? How does human language work, and in what ways does it affect our ability to perceive the "real" world? Why are there so many different cultures? Are human behavior and human nature best explained by reference to genes, race, adaptation to environment, or to the symbolic nature of culture itself? Primary Instructor: Nicholas Malone, Spring Semester 2009.
 
Oregon State University
 
ANTH 330: Evolution of Humans, Technology, and Society. This course surveys contemporary research in the fields of human biological evolution, adaptation, and prehistory.  By focusing on selected aspects of physical anthropology and prehistoric archaeology as they relate to the origins of humanity, culture, and the development of human biological and cultural diversity, students will become acquainted with the methodological and theoretical tools necessary to understand humans in cross-cultural and evolutionary perspective. Primary Instructor: Nicholas Malone, Fall Term 2007.
 
ANTH 440/540: Sp. Topics in Physical Anthropology – Primate Evolution. This course will cover the last 70 million years of primate evolution, from the origin of the Order Primates through the appearance of modern forms. We will concentrate on evolutionary and ecological theory, fossil evidence, molecular dating techniques, and modern primate studies to examine the overall history of the major groupings within the primates. This will include in depth examination of morphological characteristics and predicted ecological profiles of the major extinct primate groups and discussions of specific phylogenetic trends in primate evolution. Primary Instructor: Nicholas Malone, Fall Term 2007.
    
ANTH 380: Cultures in Conflict. Communication and commerce draw East and West, industrial and pre-industrial, state and stateless societies together. Beliefs and values clash and complement one another. Explores the processes of intercultural contact, cross-cultural interaction, and the consequences of global penetration of European-American culture. Evaluates theoretical explanations for cultural persistence and change. Primary Instructor: Nicholas Malone, Winter Term 2008; Fall Term 2008.
 
ANTH 316: Peoples of the World – Southeast Asia. This course explores such topics as: the early settlement, cultural history, ecologies, population dynamics, family and gender roles, religious ideology, political and economic systems, modern social changes, and contemporary issues pertaining to indigenous peoples in Southeast Asia. Primary Instructor: Nicholas Malone, Winter Term 2008; Summer Term 2008; Fall Term 2008.
 
University of Oregon
 
ANTH 472: Primate Conservation Biology. Explores biological-ecological processes and socio-cultural influences on primate biodiversity. Primary Instructor: Nicholas Malone, Winter Term 2006.
 
ANTH 375: Primates in Ecological Communities. Explores the interactions between primates and various plant and animal species, as well as the roles each play in the larger ecological community. Primary Instructor: Nicholas Malone, Summer Session 2006.
    
Central Washington University
 
ANTH 412: Long-Term Primate Studies. A ten-week lecture course for senior level students emphasizing the theories and methods of testing evolutionary hypotheses through the examination of nonhuman primate behavioral ecology. Primary Instructor Nicholas Malone, Fall Term 2001.
 
Teaching Assistant
 
University of Oregon
 
ANTH 170: Human Origins. An in-depth introduction to paleoanthropology and the study of human evolution. Focusing on the fundamentals of evolutionary theory and molecular genetics approaches to important questions in the field. Professor John R. Lukacs, Spring 2005; Professor Stephen R. Frost, Spring 2006.
 
ANTH 171: Introduction to Monkeys and Apes.  Introduction to the taxonomy, behavior, morphological adaptations, and evolutionary history of the Order Primates. Professor Joanna E. Lambert, Fall 2002; Professor Frances J. White, Winter 2004, Fall 2004.
 
ANTH 173: Evolution of Human Sexuality.  Evolution of sex, of the sexes, and of the role of sex in mammal, primate, and human behavior.  Includes basic genetics, anatomy, physiology, and behavior. Professor Frances White, Winter & Fall, 2003.
 
ANTH 270: Introduction to Biological Anthropology.  Introduction, including laboratory experience, to human evolution, variation, and adaptation. Professor Frances White, Spring 2003; Professor Geraldine Moreno, Winter 2005.
 
ANTH 375: Primates in Ecological Communities. Responsibilities: Read and evaluate essay examinations and article summaries. Professor Joanna E. Lambert, Spring 2004.
 
ANTH 410/510: Primate Feeding and Nutrition. Responsibilities: Read and evaluate essay examinations and article summaries. Professor Joanna E. Lambert, Spring 2004.
 
 
Conference Presentations and Published Abstracts
 
Malone N.M., Fuentes, A., White, F.J., Waller, M.T., Cobden, A.K. (2008) From Range Exclusivity to Coalitionary Power: Ecological Correlates of Social Organization in Hominoids. International Journal of Primatology, 2008 Congress Issue.
 
Malone, N.M., White, F.J. (2008) The socioecology of Javan gibbons (Hylobates moloch): tests of competing hypotheses. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 2008 Meetings Issue.
 
Cobden, A, K., White, F.J., Waller, M.T., Malone, N.M., Whitten, P.L. (2008) Glucocorticoids are related to group size in wild female bonobos (Pan paniscus).  American Journal of Physical Anthropology 2008 Meetings Issue.
 
Waller, M. T., White, F.J., Cobden, A.K., Malone, N.M. (2008)  Impact of fruit abundance on bonobo party composition and social structure.  American Journal of Physical Anthropology 2008 Meetings Issue.
 
White, F. J., Waller, M.T., Cobden, A.K., Malone, N.M. (2008) Lomako bonobo population dynamics, habitat productivity, and the question of tool use.  American Journal of Physical Anthropology 2008 Meetings Issue.
 
Malone, N., Okatvinalis, H. (2006) The socio-ecology of the silvery gibbon (Hylobates moloch) in the Cagar Alam Leuweung Sancang (CALS), West Java, Indonesia. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 42 (Suppl. 1), 124.
 
Malone, N., Pakpahan, H., Oktavinalis, H. (2004). Behavioral and Ecological Responses of Silvery Gibbons (Hylobates moloch) to Severe Habitat Degradation in the Sancang Nature Reserve, West Java, Indonesia. Folia Primatologica, 75 (Suppl. 1), 115.
 
Malone, N.M., Purnama, A.R., Wedana, M., & Fuentes, A. (2001). Assessing the trade of primates in Indonesia and the collection of noninvasively obtained cytogenetic evidence (Abstract).  American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Supplement, 32, 101.
 
Matheson, M.D., Malone, N., & Fuentes, A.  (2001). An analysis of initiators and recipients of post-conflict behavior in a small social group of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).  American Journal of Primatology, Supplement 1, 54, 30.
 
Malone, N.M., Vaughan, L.L., Fuentes, A. (2000).  Conflict and post-conflict behavior in a small group of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) (Abstract). American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Supplement, 30, 218.
 
 
Grants, Honors, and Awards
 
2006-2007
Doctoral Research Fellowship, University of Oregon.
12-month tuition waiver and a cash stipend of US $18,000.
 
2005-2006
The Homer J. Barnett Fellowship, Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon.
Development and teaching of a departmental offering (ANTH 472: Primate Conservation Biology). Award includes: Tuition waiver and stipend for one academic year.
 
2005-2006
Graduate Service Award, University of Oregon. This award acknowledges the doctoral student who has demonstrated outstanding leadership and service to the University and surrounding community. Selection is directed by the Dean of the Graduate School.
 
2005-2006
Donald and Darel Stein Graduate Student Teaching Award Nominee. This award has been developed by the Graduate School to recognize outstanding teaching performances by Graduate Teaching Fellows who also maintain excellence in their own academic program.
 
2005
Chicago Zoological Society and the Chicago Board of Trade Endangered Species Fund.
The Behavioral Ecology and Conservation of Javan Gibbons (Hylobates moloch) in West Java, Indonesia. US$ 2000.00
 
2005
Sigma Xi, Grant-in-aid of Research.
Behavioral and Ecological Responses of Silvery Gibbons (Hylobates moloch) to Severe Habitat Degradation in West Java, Indonesia. US$ 1000.00
 
2004-2005
Graduate Teaching Fellowship, Department of Anthropology and the Graduate School, University of Oregon.
 
2004
U.S. Fulbright Student Program, Alternate Candidate, Indonesia.
 
2004
American Society of Primatologists, Conservation Grant. Behavioral and Ecological Responses of Silvery Gibbons (Hylobates moloch) to Severe Habitat Degradation in West Java, Indonesia. US$ 1500.00
 
2004
Freeman Fellowship, Center for Asian and Pacific Studies, University of Oregon. The Behavioral and Ecological Responses of Silvery Gibbons (Hylobates moloch) to Severe Habitat Degradation in West Java, Indonesia. US$ 1500.00
2004
University of Oregon, Departmental Research Award. US$ 500.00
 
2003-2004
Graduate Teaching Fellowship, Department of Anthropology and the Graduate School, University of Oregon.
 
2003
Gary E. Smith Summer Grant, University of Oregon Graduate School Fellowships.
Population Assessment of Silvery Gibbons (Hylobates moloch) in the Leuweung Sancang Nature Reserve, West Java, Indonesia. US$ 3000.00.
 
2003
University of Oregon, Departmental Research Award. US$ 500.00
 
2002-2003
Graduate Teaching Fellowship, Department of Anthropology and the Graduate School, University of Oregon.
 
2002
University of Oregon, National Conference Travel Grant. US$ 150.00
 
2001
Distinguished Thesis Nominee, College of Arts and Sciences and the Graduate School, Central Washington University.
 
2001
Central Washington University, Graduate Student Development Grant. US$ 400.00
 
2001
Outstanding Graduate Student, Department of Psychology, Central Washington University.
 
2000
Central Washington University, Thesis Grant Award.
Population Assessment for Displaced Hylobatids in Indonesia: Development of an Effective Conservation Strategy Based on Cytogenetic Evidence. US$ 400.00
 
2000
Central Washington University, Graduate Student Development Grant. US$ 300.00
 
2000
Primate Conservation and Welfare Society, Conservation Grant Program.  Monitoring the Trade of Primates in Indonesia. US$ 500.00
 
1999
Sigma Xi, Grant-in-Aid of Research.
Population Assessment for Displaced Hylobatids in Indonesia: Development of an Effective Conservation Strategy Based on Cytogenetic Evidence. US$ 800.00
 
 
Invited Lectures and Organized Symposia
 
2008
Malone, N.  Conservation: Politics, Primates, and Anthropology. Primate Conservation Speaker Series, Humboldt State University, November 19th, 2008, Arcata, CA.
 
2008
Malone, N.  Primate Research and Conservation: Science and Research in Anthropology. Freshmen Science Honours Colloquium, University of Oregon, April 28, 2008, Eugene, OR.
 
2008
Malone, N.  Politically Engaged Anthropology: Perspectives and Applications. Quest University Canada, April 7th, 2008, Squamish, British Columbia.
 
2008
Malone, N.  Recent research on bonobos (Pan paniscus) in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Anthropology Tan Sack Speakers Series, Oregon State University, April 2nd, 2008, Corvallis, OR.
 
2007
Malone, N.  Anthropology as an Emancipatory Social Science. Commencement address: joint ceremony of Anthropology and Geography, University of Oregon, June 16th, 2007, Eugene, OR.
 
2007
Malone, N.  The Socioecology of the Critically Endangered Javan Gibbon (Hylobates moloch): Assessing the Impact of Anthropogenic Disturbance on Primate Social Systems. Invited lecture to the Evolutionary Focus Group of the Institute of Cognitive and Decision Sciences (ICDS) at the University of Oregon, May 25th, 2007, Eugene, OR.
 
2007
Malone, N.  A Wider Look at Primates and Their Habitats. Keynote lecture (in Bahasa Indonesia) at the 5th Annual “Primate Day” Seminar, January 15th, 2007, Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia (UPI), Bandung, West Java, Indonesia.
 
2006
White, F.J., Orbell, J., Malone, N.  Evolution of alternative mating strategies in human and nonhuman primates. A paper presented at the 18th annual meeting of the Human Behavior and Evolution Society, June 8-10, 2006, Philadelphia, PA.
 
2006
Malone, N., Okatavinalis, H.  The socioecology of the silvery gibbon (Hylobates moloch) in the Cagar Alam Leuweung Sancang (CALS), West Java, Indonesia. A paper presented at the 75th annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists, March 10th, 2005, Anchorage, AK.
 
2005
Longo, S.B., Malone, N.  Meat, Medicine, and Materialism: A Biological and Sociological Assessment of Human Relationships to Nonhuman Animals and the Environment. A paper presented at the Association of Pacific Rim Universities Doctoral Conference: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Sustainability. August 22-27, 2005, Eugene, OR.
 
2004
Malone, N., Pakpahan, H., Oktavinalis, H.  Behavioral and Ecological Responses of Silvery Gibbons (Hylobates moloch) to Severe Habitat Degradation in the Sancang Nature Reserve, West Java, Indonesia. A paper presented at the XXth Congress of the International Primatological Society, August 18-23, 2004. Torino, Italy.
 
2004
The Importance of Basic Research, Applied Projects, and the Anthropological Perspective in the Study of Nonhuman Primates. Symposium Organized for the 57th Annual Northwest Anthropological Conference, March 25 – 27, 2004, Eugene, OR.
 
2004
Malone, N.  Introductory comments for the symposium: The Importance of Basic Research, Applied Projects, and the Anthropological Perspective in the Study of Nonhuman Primates. A paper presented at the 57th Annual Northwest Anthropological Conference, March 25 – 27, 2004, Eugene, OR.
 
2003
Techniques, Applications, and Action: Moving Beyond the Call for Conservation.
Symposium Co-organized with A. Fuentes, Notre Dame University, for the 72nd annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists, Tempe, AZ.
 
2003
Fuentes, A., & Malone, N.  Introductory comments for the symposium: Techniques, Applications, and Action: Moving beyond the call for conservation.
Co-organized with A. Fuentes, Notre Dame University, for the 72nd annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists, Tempe, AZ.
 
2003
Malone, N.  Emerging Perspectives on Gibbon Behavioral Ecology and Conservation in Indonesia.  Conservation Biology Lecture Series, Lincoln Park Zoological Gardens, Chicago, IL. July 16, 2003.
 
2003
Malone, N.  Small Apes, Great Challenges: Hylobatid conservation in Indonesia.  Department of Anthropology Colloquium Series, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR. January 31, 2003.
 
2002
Malone, N., & Fuentes, A.  Long-term field data, emerging perspectives, and human influences: The importance of integration in hylobatid conservation.  A paper presented at the XIXth Congress of the International Primatological Society, Beijing, China.
 
2002
Matheson, M.D., Malone, N., & Fuentes, A.  Post-conflict interactions with third parties in a small social group of captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).  A paper presented at the 25th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Primatologists. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.
 
2002
Malone, N.  Primate Conservation.  Anthropology 171, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR.  November 19, 2002.
 
2001
Malone, N.M., Purnama, A.R., Wedana, M., & Fuentes, A.  Assessing the trade of primates in Indonesia and the collection of noninvasively obtained cytogenetic evidence.  A poster presented at the 70th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists, Kansas City, Missouri.
 
2001
Matheson, M.D., Malone, N., & Fuentes, A.  An analysis of initiators and recipients of post-conflict behavior in a small social group of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).  A paper presented at the 24th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Primatologists, Savannah, Georgia.
 
2000
Malone, N.  Preliminary Report on the Primate Trade in Java and Bali, Indonesia.  Balinese Macaque Project Field School, Ubud, Bali, Indonesia.  July 15, 2000.
 
2000
Malone, N.M., Vaughan, L.L., Fuentes, A.  Conflict and post-conflict behavior in a small group of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).  A poster presented at the 69th Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists, San Antonio, Texas.
 
2000
Malone, N. Monitoring the Trade of Primates in Indonesia. Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, WA. November 30, 2000.
 
1999
Malone, N.M., Vaughan, L.L., Fuentes, A.  The role of human caregivers in chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) post-conflict interactions.  A paper presented at the Meeting of the Human Behavior and Evolution Society, Salt Lake City, Utah.
 
 
 
Professional Reviews
 
2008-Present
American Anthropologist: professional peer-reviewed journal.
 
2008-Present
American Journal of Primatology: professional peer-reviewed journal.
 
2007-Present
National Science Foundation: BCS-Physical Anthropology Program.
 
2007-Present
American Journal of Physical Anthropology: professional peer-reviewed journal.
 
2007-Present
Primate Conservation, Inc.: PCI is a not-for-profit foundation founded to fund field research that supports conservation programs for wild populations of primates.
 
2007-Present
Organization and the Environment: professional peer-reviewed journal.
 
2003
Linking Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Tourism in World Heritage Sites: Ujung Kulon National Park (UKNP), Indonesia. Report created by UNESCO, UNEP, UKNP, WWF, and RARE Center for Tropical Conservation.
 
2001
Reintroduction Guidelines for Nonhuman Primates: Policies and Procedures. A publication of the IUCN Species Survival Committee & Primate Specialist Group.
 
 
Membership in Professional Societies
 
2007-Present
American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA), Regular Member.
 
2007-Present
International Primatological Society (IPS), Regular Member.
 
2003-Present
Konservasi Alam Nusantara (KONUS): The Indonesian Nature Conservation Society, Regular Member.
 
2002-Present
Northwest Primate Conservation Society (NWPCS), Founding Member.
 
2002-2006
International Primatological Society (IPS), Student Member.
 
2001-Present
Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society, Associate Member.
 
1999-2006
American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA), Student Member.
 
 
Service and Leadership Activities
 
2007
Committee Chair: Legislative Issues, American Federation of Teachers – Oregon (AFT-OR) Annual Convention, April 20-22, 2007, Sunriver, OR
 
2006-2007
Elected Vice President: Political Education, Graduate Teaching Fellows Federation (GTFF – Local 3544, AFT-OR & AFL-CIO).
 
2006
AFL-CIO Summer School, sponsored by the Labor Education and Research Center (LERC), July 28-30, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR.
 
2005-2006
Graduate Teaching Fellows Federation – Department of Anthropology Union Steward.
 
2004-2005
Student Representative, Departmental Search for .5 FTE Biological Anthropologist (Primatologist), University of Oregon.
 
2004
Chair, General Session: Biological Anthropology. The 57th Annual Northwest Anthropological Conference, March 25 – 27, 2004, Eugene, OR.
 
2003-2005
Elected Co-President, Association of Anthropology Graduate Students (AAGS), University of Oregon.
 
2003-2004
Panel Participant, Seminar for Undergraduates in Pursuit of Graduate Training in Anthropology. Spring 2003/2004.
 
 
Extracurricular Activities
 
2007
Participant, Community Mentor Program, 4j School District, Eugene, Oregon. This program connects students with community volunteers with the goal of fostering positive social and learning skills in an educational setting.
 
2005
Testimony before a Joint Session of the Oregon Legislature: Public Budgetary Hearing of the Ways and Means - Higher Education Sub-committee. Salem, OR, April 27, 2005.
 
2003
Musical performance: Javanese Gamelan (Pak Joko Purwanto, director), Beall Concert Hall, University of Oregon, May 28, 2003.
Language Proficiency
 
English: Fluent (native speaker)
Indonesian: Advanced speaker; intermediate reading and writing skills
Sundanese (West Java): Conversational
 
 
Professional References
 
Dr. Frances J. White, Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon, fwhite@uoregon.edu
Dr. Agustin Fuentes, Department of Anthropology, Notre Dame University, Agustin.Fuentes.10@nd.edu
Dr. Stephen Wooten, International Studies, University of Oregon, swooten@uoregon.edu
Dr. John Lukacs, Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon, jrlukacs@uoregon.edu
Dr. Aletta Biersack, Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon, abiersac@uoregon.edu
Dr. Lynn Stephen, Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon, stephenl@uoregon.edu
Dr. Joanna E. Lambert, Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin, jelambert@wisc.edu
Dr. David McMurray, Department of Anthropology, Oregon State Univ., david.mcmurray@oregonstate.edu
 
 
 
 
 
Nicholas Malone, Ph.D.
Biological Anthropology
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