HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY PROCEDURES AND CONTINGENCY PLAN FOR THE

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

    1. DESIGNATED EMERGENCY COORDINATORS…………………………………. 1
    2. INTRODUCTION………………………………………………………………………. 3
    3. SPILL PREVENTION, CONTROL, AND COUNTERMEASURESPLAN…………. 4
    4. SPILLS/LEAKING CONTAINERS……………………………………………………. 12
    5. CONTAINER MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES………………………………………. 13
    6. HAZARDOUS WASTE STORAGE AREA…………………………………………. 15
    7. FIRE/EXPLOSIONS……………………………………………………………………. 16
    8. PERSONAL INJURY……………………………………………………………………. 17
    9. REPORTING REQUIREMENTS………………………………………………………. 18
    10. STORM WATER POLLUTION CONTROL PLAN
    11. FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF OREGON POWER PLANT…………………………. 20
    12. APPENDIX A: MAP OF STORM AND SANITARY DRAINS…………………. 23
    13. APPENDIX B: SANITARY SEWER DISCHARGE POSTER……………………. 24
    14. APPENDIX C: MAP OF HAZARDOUS WASTE STORAGE AREA……………. 25

  1. DESIGNATED EMERGENCY COORDINATORS

 

1. The emergency coordinator should be contacted, whenever there is an imminent or actual emergency. These individuals have had training in responding to emergency situations and have complete authority to commit resources of the University in the event of an emergency.

2. In all emergencies the safety of personnel is the first priority.

EMERGENCY COORDINATORS

OFFICE HOME RADIO# PAGER

Kay Coots

346-5421 485-6313 111 334-5514

Nick Williams

346-3197 345-4343 112 684-1490

Todd Grenz

346-2865 747-1290 114 341-7205

Don Elting

346-2864 342-1105 113 341-7174

Mark Maguire

346-2908 607-5565 104 984-3716

 

ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

FIRE DEPARTMENT and PARAMEDICS

9-911

ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

UO PUBLIC SAFETY EMERGENCY NUMBER

346-6666

ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

346-3192

ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

OREGON EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT DIVISION

(800) 452-0311

ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

NATIONAL RESPONSE CENTER

(800) 424-8802

 

 

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POISON CONTROL CENTER

(800) 452-7165

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REGION X EPA WASTE MANAGEMENT

1-800-424-4372

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SACRED HEART HOSPITAL EMERGENCY

686-6931

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MCKENZIE WILLAMETTE HOSPITAL

726-4444

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WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT

984-8600 AFTER HOURS 682-8620

 

 

II. INTRODUCTION

This HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY PROCEDURES AND CONTINGENCY PLAN describes the steps that must be taken by all responding personnel to situations at the University of Oregon which pose a real or potential threat to human health or the environment. The provisions of this plan must be carried out immediately whenever there is a fire, explosion, or unplanned sudden or non-sudden release of a hazardous substance or hazardous substance constituents to air, soil, or water which could threaten human health or the environment. This plan includes the spill prevention, control, and countermeasures plan as well as the storm water pollution control plan which are required of facilities at locations in which petroleum compounds could reach waterways in the event of an accident.

ARRANGEMENTS WITH LOCAL AUTHORITIES. The Eugene Fire Department and the Eugene Department of Public Safety will respond to any emergency at the University of Oregon upon request. These agencies, along with Sacred Heart Medical Center, have been notified that the University of Oregon is a large quantity generator of hazardous waste and that the possibility of incidents involving hazardous materials exists.

III. SPILL PREVENTION, CONTROL, AND COUNTERMEASURES PLAN

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) prepared an Oil Pollution Prevention Regulation (OPPR) and published it in Volume 38, Number 237, of the Federal Register on December 11, 1973. This regulation addresses non-transportation related facilities and is further explained in Title 40, Code of Regulations (CFR), Part 112. The main requirement for facilities, including the University of Oregon, subject to the regulation is the preparation and implementation of a Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plan.

The purpose of this regulation is to prevent discharges of oil into the waters of the

United States. Hence, the main thrust is prevention as opposed to after-the-fact or

reactive measures commonly described in spill contingency plans. The objective

is for facilities to prepare and implement the SPCC Plan by following the

guidelines outlined in 40 CFR 112.7.

The OPPR applies to owners and operators of facilities engaged in drilling,

producing, gathering, storing, processing, refining, transferring, or consuming oil

and oil products, providing:

A. The facility is non-transportation related.

B. Aboveground storage capacity of a single container is in excess of 660 gallons, or an aggregate aboveground storage capacity is greater than 1,320 gallons, or the total below ground storage capacity is greater than 42,000 gallons.

C. Facilities which, due to their location, could reasonably expect a harmful quantity(1) of spilled oil to reach waters of the United States.

The University has five underground storage tanks (USTs). Three of the tanks contain #2 fuel oil and have a capacity of 30,000 gallons each. One tank contains unleaded fuel with a capacity of 6,000 gallons and the remaining tank contains diesel fuel with a capacity of 2,500 gallons. The slope of the surrounding terrain and the proximity of the storm sewer catch basins indicate a harmful discharge could reach the Millrace. Therefore, according to 40 CFR 11, the University must develop and implement a SPCC plan. The following pages comprise the plan, including general information, a spill history, site and equipment description, probable equipment failures, and an emergency response to avoid oil discharges.

____________________

1"Harmful quantity" is defined as a discharge that could: (1) violate any applicable water quality standard, or (2) cause a film or sheen on the surface, or cause a sludge or emulsion beneath the surface of the receiving body of water.

 

RESPONSIBILITIES

Director of Campus Operations

The Director is responsible for overseeing the various activities related to the department. The Director provides funding for the upgrading and installing storm water pollution control equipment.

Utilities Manager

The Manager is responsible for overseeing for activities at the power plant and its utilities system, including product acquisitions, oil transfers, overall flow operation, and the maintenance of the tanks and plumbing system. The Manager also is the primary coordinator of the power plant emergency response team. In the event of a spill, the Manager will report the incident to the Office of Environmental Health and Safety (OEHS). The Utilities Manager is also responsible for ensuring storm water catch basins are evaluated and cleaned on a regular basis.

Power Plant Shift Operator

The Shift Operator is responsible for making initial assessments and controlling plant activities. During an incident, the Shift Operator also is responsible for notifying the Manger and the Office of Public Safety. The Shift Operator will respond according to the pre-approved Spill Response Plan and related standard operating procedures.

Power Plant Oil Spill Response Team

The primary responders comprise of a Team supervisor and pre-determined Team Members. As responders, the Spill Response Team is responsible for immediately mobilizing and acting on any oil spills that occur at the power plant. Team members will coordinate their response activities with the OEHS.

Office of Environmental Health and Safety (OEHS)

OEHS is responsible for acting as reserve primary responders to the spill response team. If necessary, OEHS will provide on-site response support, including personnel and equipment. OEHS also is responsible for making the determination whether additional assistance is necessary, such as from the State Hazardous Materials (HAZMAT) Team. If a release occurs, OEHS is responsible for notifying the appropriate agencies if necessary.

 

 

 

SITE AND EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTIONS

Site Overview

According to a U.S. Geological Survey quadrant map, the power plant is located 44 degrees/2 minutes/55 seconds latitude and 123 degrees/4 minutes/24 seconds longitude. The site is situated north of the University of Oregon main campus, separated by Franklin Boulevard and the Millrace.

According to an environmental site assessment (1990) conducted by L.R. Squier Associates, material below the surface consists of human-made fill consisting of silt, sand, and gravel, interspersed with highly organic silt and wood fragments. Below this layer lies alluvial sediments consisting of coarse gravel, sand, and silt. Ground water may be below this layer, possibly between 20-30 feet in depth.

The surface elevation slopes toward the south, in the direction of the Millrace. Following the northeastern contour curve, the highest elevation is 426.2, the midpoint is 425.8 feet, and the southern most point is 425. The five underground storage tanks are 125 to 130 feet from the millrace.

Drainage Systems and Surface Waterways

As the map in Appendix A shows, the nearest storm drain to the tanks is located on the west side of the UST pad. The pad is angled in such a way that any surface water on the pad will flow to the north drain that contains an oil/water separator. There is also one catch basin located at the northwest corner of the power plant which flows to the sanitary sewer. There is a bed of gravel between the pad and the catch basin. The drainage to this catch basin is above the level of the tanks.

The Millrace flows in a westward direction by the power plant. After a short distance past the power plant, the Millrace gets diverted as it turns to the southwest. The westward diversion directs water to the City of Eugene storm water system that drains to the Willamette River, slightly east of EWEB’s steam plant.

Power Plant Structures and Procedures for Inspecting Equipment

The power plant is shown on the map in Appendix A. The underground tank farm containing the three #2 fuel oil tanks, one unleaded fuel tank, one diesel fuel tank, and all the piping is located on the north side of the Power Plant. There is adequate security for the tank farm during the day due to its visibility. After hours locked gates prevent access to the yard.

Underground Oil Storage Tanks

The five USTs are constructed of double walled fiberglass. The three 30,000 gallon #2 fuel oil tanks are 10 feet in diameter and 56 feet, 3 inches long. The top of the tanks are 5 feet beneath the surface. They are strapped to concrete anchors and bedded in gravel and sand. These tanks are equipped with an interstitial leak detection system. The tanks were installed in June 1994 after the Bunker C oil tanks were removed.

Tank Valve Shed

The tank valve shed is located on the north side of the plant. The shed consists of concrete floor with steel walls and roof. The shed houses supply and return piping and valves for the #2 fuel oil tanks. The piping is double walled fiberglass with an interstitial leak detection system. The valves are steel.

Tank Turbine Pump

All five of the USTs are equipped with a submersible turbine pump. The pumps for the #2 fuel oil cam pump 50 gallons per minute (GPM) at 45 pounds per square inch at gauge (PSIG) with 1 ½ horse power (HP) motor operating at 1750 revolutions per minute (RPM). The pumps for the unleaded gasoline and diesel fuel can pump 14 GPM at 25 PSIG with a Ύ HP motor operating at 1750 RPM. The pumps are contained in a catch basin that drains to the oil/water separator.

Two Oil Booster Pumps

There are two fuel booster pumps inside the plant which deliver fuel oil to the boilers. They are Worthington type GR positive displacement pumps. They can pump 50 GPM at 150 PSIG with a 15 HP motor operating at 1200 RPM. The internal piping is equipped with relief valves to recirculate oil back to the tank on suction.

Oil System Operation and Unleaded Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Pump Island

The fuel turbine pumps take suction on the oil tank that is aligned. The turbine pump discharges oil to the supply header for the fuel oil supply booster pumps. The supply pump discharges oil to a header where it can go either to the boiler or back to the tank on suction. Under normal operation one supply pump is utilized, and during peak demand a second supply pump is started.

There is a fuel dispensing island located above the eastern side of the UST farm. The island consists of one unleaded gasoline dispensing pump and recorder and one diesel fuel dispensing pump and recorder. Emergency shut-off devices for the pumps are located on the island itself and an additional emergency button is located on the north wall of the EWEB Intertie building (part of the power plant)

Leak Detection and Inventory Control System

The leak detection system is monitored and controlled from the power plant control room. Sensors are located in the tank turbine pump catch basins, between the double walls of all five tanks and in the spaces between the double walls of the oil piping systems. If a leak in the primary tank or piping walls occurs, an audible and visual alarm sounds to notify the power plant operator that a leak is occurring. The system also consists of level sensors installed in the tanks for individual tank control.

 

SPILL HISTORY

Spill equipment including booms, pads, diatomaceous earth, and plastic tarping are located at the west end of the plant in the maintenance area. Other chemicals spill kits are located adjacent to the control room, in the maintenance area, in the chiller room, and in the battery room. Only one spill has occurred since the installation of the two (now removed) bunker C oil tank systems. The incident occurred during the summer in 1987 when a truck driver delivering the Bunker C oil to the power plant over-filled a tank while making the transfer. Spillage of 15 to 20 gallons of bunker C oil was contained inside the Oil Tank Valve Pit. Due to the concrete pit's structural integrity, the oil did not reach the waters of the United States. To date, there have been no inappropriate discharges to waters of the United States.

 

SPILL SCENARIOS AND PREVENTATIVE MEASURES

There are many scenarios that may cause an oil spill. The following is a list of the most likely based on the process and equipment utilized.

1. Truck driver delivering oil crashes into a fixed structure or another vehicle. The tanker accident with the structure or a vehicle punctures and causes the oil to spill onto the ground. Worst-case scenario assumes the maximum quantity spilled would be 8,600 gallons, which is based upon a southerly or westerly oil flow into a nearby storm drain, tunnel access, or directly into the Millrace.

Spill prevention measures include:

a. Insuring the University selects a reputable oil vendor that employs safe and reliable drivers.

b. Power plant operators reviewing the vendor's standard operating procedures for drivers when they arrive at a facility.

c. Preparing operational procedures for the delivery truck driver to follow upon arriving on University property.

d. Providing clear access to the oil transfer area.

2. Delivery truck equipment (i.e., connectors, hose, shut-off valve) malfunctions. Worst-case scenario assumes the maximum quantity spilled would be 8,600 gallons of spilled oil, which would flow onto the ground and into a nearby sanitary sewer or into the Tank Oil Valve Pit.

Spill prevention measures include:

a. Insuring vendor's truck and hoses have safety shut-off valves or an override system in case a malfunction does occur.

b. Preparing operational procedures for the delivery truck driver to follow upon arriving on University property.

3. Delivery truck operator overfills the tank or pulls away with the hoses still connected. Worst-case scenario assumes 1,000 gallons of oil would flow into the containment basin, which would overflow and run into the Millrace.

Besides the tank containment system, additional spill prevention measures could include:

a. Insuring vendor has appropriate procedures that will allow the driver to perform the task with minimal risk of accidental spills.

b. Reviewing vendor operating procedures with power plant employees to insure best transfer practices are being used.

c. Insuring an automatic shut-off switch discontinues oil flow when the oil equals the fill-to line.

4. University equipment (i.e., connectors, hose) used to transfer the oil malfunctions. As a projected worse-case scenario, 300 gallons would flow into the catch basin, onto the road, and possibly into the storm drain to the northwest of the tank farm. If the leak occurs inside the plant, the oil could flow underneath the building.

Spill prevention measures could include:

a. Performing routine preventative maintenance checks to insure transfer equipment is functioning properly.

b. Performing routine checks of the oil containment basin and valve building to identify and contain leaks early.

c. Stock absorbent supplies in case oil spills onto ground around the oil supply vehicle.

5. A maintenance worker neglects to tighten piping connections or replace valves during routine maintenance. Oil would likely spill onto the ground or floor of the plant and flow to a storm drain. The amount of oil spill would vary, but probably not more than 100 gallons.

Spill prevention measures include:

a. Following the standard operating procedures that involve a routine preventative maintenance schedule.

b. Performing quality assurance inspections after maintenance projects.

6. Indoor oil system equipment, piping, valves, and connections could leak through the floor drain, into the juncture box, and into the sanitary sewer. However, there is a possibility of the submersible transfer pump clogging, oil overflowing into the area underneath the plant, and being pumped into the millrace via the oil water separator.

Spill prevention measures include:

a. Plant operators taking hourly walks through the facility to visually check all equipment and systems, correcting discrepancies or isolating leaks which may occur.

b. Performing routine maintenance checks on all of the equipment.

c. Inspecting the area under the plant or indication of leaks.

 

  1. RECOMMENDATIONS

Continue to perform monthly oil level checks with a measuring stick on a regular basis and maintain accurate records.

Continue to perform thorough piping inspections on a frequent schedule and

maintain records in the automated databases.

Prepare standard operating procedures for oil delivery operations, emergency

equipment shutdowns, and emergency response team action using spill kits.

Review and update oil spill-related standard operating procedures annually.

Place emergency response team standard operating procedures with the power

plant’s spill kits.

Continue conducting annual training workshops on oil spill prevention and response procedures for plant employees. This training is to include reviewing the SPCC and SWPCP as well as hands on emergency response drills.

Increase lighting on the north and west sides of the power plant so spills and leaks can be detected during evening hours.

 

 

 

 

IV. SPILLS/LEAKING CONTAINERS

A. A SPILL is defined as an unexpected release of any material from a container. For operational purposes, spills of hazardous materials will be divided into two levels:

1. SMALL SPILLS are defined as less than or equal to 500 milliliters. In some cases, such as those involving extremely hazardous substances, spills less than 500 milliliters will be considered large spills based upon the material spilled. Small spills may, at the discretion of the employees involved, be handled directly by personnel in the immediate area who are familiar with the associated hazards.

2. MAJOR SPILLS are defined as greater than 500 milliliters. Major spills must be reported to the Emergency Coordinator so that emergency assistance will be available if needed. Employees should leave the immediate area until assistance arrives. Unexpected compressed gas releases and releases of extremely hazardous substances will be treated as major spills.

B. A LEAK is a release from a container via a puncture or other small opening of a weak spot in the container. Leaks will be treated as small spills unless they result in a rapid discharge of material.

IN THE EVENT OF A SPILL,

EVACUATE THE IMMEDIATE AREA.

Obtain proper personal protective equipment. Eye, hand, body, and respiratory protection may be necessary. The level of bodily protection depends on the size and material spilled.

IF THE SPILL IS MAJOR, DO NOT RE-ENTER THE CONTAMINATED AREA UNTIL AN EMERGENCY COORDINATOR OR THE FIRE DEPARTMENT ARRIVES AND INDICATES IT IS SAFE TO DO SO.

NOTIFY THE FIRE DEPARTMENT AND THE UO PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICE IF THE SPILL IS LARGE ENOUGH TO THREATEN HUMAN HEALTH OR THE ENVIRONMENT, OR IF ASSISTANCE IS REQUIRED IN MANAGING THE SPILL.

 

 

  1. CONTAINER MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES

 

Environmental Health and Safety has developed container management guidelines for the University community. The reason for the adoption of these guidelines is to take a proactive and comprehensive approach to ensure containers are properly labeled, stored, and discarded. The goal is to eliminate the presence of unmarked and unclaimed containers on University-owned property.

For the purpose of these guidelines, a container is defined as a drum able to hold five (5) gallons or greater. Performance criterion for effective guidelines include the proper storing and labeling of unused products, rinsing of empty containers, and the storing of empty containers.

For the University to implement effective container management guidelines, OEHS is asking each department to read and implement the steps below:

1. Label all containers with a durable material (i.e. paint, stickers) indicating department ownership, possibly using initials (e.g. EMU, AAA, etc.) and container contents.

2. Label containers with the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) or hazardous material identification system (HMIS) sticker to identify the material’s hazards.

3. Label containers with the word "EMPTY" if they do not contain any material.

4. Store all containers in an area secured by a locked door or gate that the department monitors to prevent tampering. Lids and bungs should be continuously in place, except when adding to or removing from containers.

5. Empty containers of 5 gallons or less may be placed in the trash. Before the container is collected, the person making the request must provide a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) of the material that was being stored. Notify Facilities Services Support Services if an empty container over 5 gallons is no longer needed and it will be collected.

  1. Before transferring any container off-site or disposing of its contents, ensure someone has:

Drained the container thoroughly by inverting it and allowing the material to flow into an acceptable receptacle for a considerable amount of time, and

Contacted OEHS at 6-3192 for waste collection if the material is hazardous.

If you are unsure whether a material is hazardous or not, call 6-3192 for assistance in making the determination.

7. Before reusing or disposing of a an empty container, ensure the label that identified it as a hazardous material, is defaced or removed.

NOTE. If a container is found containing an unknown material, a sample is drawn by OEHS. The reason for this is to determine whether it is to be disposed of as hazardous waste. A hazard categorization is performed so the waste can be disposed of properly.

 

VI. HAZARDOUS WASTE STORAGE AREA

1. FACILITY LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION

The hazardous waste storage facility is located at the Office of Environmental Health and Safety. The street address of the facility is 1230 Franklin Boulevard. The main entrance to the facility is a set of double fire doors located on the north-east side of the facility facing the Klamath Hall loading dock. Access to the facility is through locked doors. Floor drains in the facility have been plugged to prevent the release of hazardous waste into the sanitary sewer system in the event of a spill. A catch basin cover, along with other emergency response equipment, is also located at the facility.

2. FACILITY USE

The hazardous waste storage facility is used for the storage of hazardous waste chemicals and mixtures of chemicals generated from laboratory, shop, and housing operations at the University. The majority of these chemicals are in small containers, and are stored in secondary containment trays located in the south room of the facility (room 77). A wide variety of chemicals may be present in the room at any time, and may be toxic, corrosive, carcinogenic, flammable, oxidizing, water reactive, or irritating. Bulk flammable and halogenated waste solvents are stored in the south end of the facility (room 77) in 55 gallon drums, with a combined maximum capacity of 110 gallons. Room 76 of the facility is the chemical receiving and processing area. This area also contains industrial hygiene equipment for monitoring various potential contaminants as well as spill control equipment.

VII. FIRE/EXPLOSIONS

1. IN CASE OF ANY FIRE OR EXPLOSION, PULL AN ALARM BEFORE ATTEMPTING ANY OTHER ACTION. Immediately report all fires by dialing 6-6666 after evacuating to an area where such communication is safe to perform. Then proceed to the predesignated emergency meeting area.

2. Give your name, location, telephone number, and a brief explanation of the problem. Request notification of an Emergency Coordinator from the Office of Public Safety dispatch.

3. IF THE FIRE CAN BE SAFELY FOUGHT WITH A PORTABLE EXTINGUISHER, DO SO. IF IN DOUBT, LEAVE THE AREA IMMEDIATELY.

4. The Fire Captain at the scene becomes the incident commander and has total control of the situation whenever a fire or explosion occurs, or at other times when Fire Department assistance may be required. The Office of Public Safety will assist with securing the area and denying entry. The Emergency Coordinator is responsible for chemical safety and advice, including chemical control, location, and compliance with DEQ and EPA regulations.

5. After the situation is contained, the area must be carefully checked for other hazards, cleaned, and decontaminated. All hazards relating to the incident will be removed before personnel are allowed to reenter the area. Do not reenter the area until instructed it is safe to do so by either the on-scene incident commander or the emergency coordinator.

6. Report the incident as described in Section IX.

 

 

 

VIII. PERSONAL INJURY

1. If a serious injury involving a hazardous material occurs on the campus, the Office of Public Safety must be called (ext. 6-6666). The victim is to be taken to Sacred Heart Medical Center. The following information should be sent with the victim:

A. identity and hazardous properties of the material involved.

B. estimated quantity involved.

C. time and location of the incident.

2. The Emergency Coordinator will assist the hospital staff with necessary information.

3. In addition, the Emergency Coordinator should inspect the area to assure that the condition which resulted in personal injury has been resolved. The emergency coordinator may need to contain or clean up the spill of hazardous material. Spill control and containment equipment is located in Klamath B32 as well as Onyx 75. Any spill equipment and/or PPE must be properly decontaminated or designated as hazardous waste after use.

 

 

  1. REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

All responses to incidents will be recorded on an OEHS incident report. The remarks section of this form will contain a critique of the response to the incident and possible methods of preventing the incident in the future.

The University of Oregon does not discharge hazardous waste into the sanitary sewer system. Wastewater discharge practices include:

    1. No discharge of regulated hazardous waste into the sanitary sewer system

B. Acids and bases with a pH between 5.5 and 12.0 are allowed into the sanitary sewer system provided they are not mixed with any other potential contaminants.

C. Before a questionable material is discharged to the sanitary sewer system, Environmental Health and Safety must be contacted at 6-3192 for approval.

 

DISCHARGE NOTIFICATION PROCEDURES

A. A poster, Emergency Procedures for Sanitary Sewer Discharges, has been distributed to each laboratory, shop, and studio for posting near the sink or telephone. The daily pollutant limits, as provided in the University’s wastewater discharge permit, are listed on the poster. In the event of an accidental discharge, the poster instructs personnel to call the Office of Public Safety at 6-6666 immediately. The Office of Public Safety provides staff to monitor incoming calls 24 hours a day.

In the event of an emergency incident, The Emergency Coordinator should:

1. Make certain all personnel in the area are aware of the emergency and are removed to a safe location.

2. Notify the Office of Public Safety for additional assistance, if needed.

3. Identify the chemical nature and extent of the spilled or released material. In the worst case, arrange for analysis and identification.

4. Assess possible danger to human health and the environment.

a. If none exists, proceed with containment, cleanup and decontamination.

b. If the assessment indicates that evacuation of local areas may be advisable:

1. Notify the Office of Public Safety Office as to the nature and extent of the incident.

2. Assist in determining the necessary evacuation perimeter.

3. Immediately notify the Department of Environmental Quality or the Oregon Emergency Management Division if:

a. The incident exposes individuals which are not solely within the boundaries of the campus; or

b. The amount of hazardous material released is above the reportable quantity specified in OAR 340-108-010 in any 24-hour period AND is not contained on an impervious surface.

B. Any incident that requires implementation of Part IX 3. of this contingency plan should be reported in writing within 15 days to the DEQ and the Regional Administrator of the EPA. The report must include:

1. Name, address, and phone number of the owner or operator and of the facility;

2. Date, time, and type of incident;

3. Name, and quantity of material(s) involved;

    1. The extent of injuries, if any;
    2. An assessment of actual or potential hazards to human health or the environment, where applicable;
    3. Estimated quantity and disposition of recovered material that resulted from the incident;
    4. Steps taken to prevent a recurrence of the incident; and
    5. Any changes required in the contingency plan.

 

X. STORM WATER POLLUTION CONTROL PLAN FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF OREGON POWER PLANT

In November 1990, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) adopted rules (see 40 CFR 122 to 124) that require a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for storm water discharges from certain municipalities and several groups of industries. Since the University of Oregon owns and operates a steam electric power generating plant and there is a discharge of non contact cooling water as a point source to surface waters from the site, a non contact cooling water discharge permit as well as a general storm water permit is required. One of the conditions of the permits is the implementation of a Storm Water Pollution Control Plan (SWPCP). This plan was originally drafted in May of 1993. Major changes in the facility during 1993-94 required the plan to be modified. The plan is evaluated on an annual basis and changes made as necessary.

The University of Oregon is an educational institution located within the City of Eugene. There are a wide variety of responsibilities and functions performed on the campus. Some of these include academic, research, building maintenance, security, housing, and power generation activities. The University has a history of proactive environmental stewardship and has been in full compliance with storm water permit conditions on the campus.

 

RESPONSIBILITIES

Director of Campus Operations

The Director is responsible for overseeing the various activities related to the department. The Director provides funding for the upgrading and installing storm water pollution control equipment.

Utilities Manager

The Manager is responsible for overseeing the activities at the power plant and its utilities system, including hazardous material acquisitions, overall flow operation, and the maintenance of storm water catch basins. Also, the Manager is the primary coordinator of the power plant emergency response team. In the event of a spill, the Manager will report the incident to the Office of Environmental Health and Safety (OEHS).

Power Plant Shift Operator

The Shift Operator is responsible for making initial assessments and controlling plant activities. During an incident, the Shift Operator also is responsible for notifying the Utilities Manager and the Office of Public Safety. The Shift Operator will respond according to the pre-approved spill response plan and related standard operating procedures.

 

 

Power Plant Oil Spill Response Team

The primary responders comprise of a team supervisor and pre-determined

team members. As responders, the spill response team is responsible for immediately mobilizing and acting on any oil spills that occur at the power plant. Team members will coordinate their response activities with the OEHS.

Office of Environmental Health and Safety

The Office of Environmental Health and Safety is responsible for acting as reserve primary responders to the spill response team. If necessary, OEHS will provide on-site response support, including personnel and equipment. OEHS also is responsible for making the determination whether additional assistance is necessary, such as from the State Hazardous Materials (HAZMAT) Team. In the event of a release, OEHS is responsible for notifying the appropriate agencies if necessary.

 

STORM WATER POLLUTION CONTROLS

 

Storm Water Management

Storm water management responsibilities lie primarily with the Utilities Manager and his or her employees. OEHS will provide assistance when necessary.

Containment

The three 30,000 gallon underground #2 fuel oil tanks, one 2,500 gallon underground diesel tank and one 6,000 gallon underground unleaded gasoline tank are not in secondary containment but are double walled fiberglass with an interspacial leak detection system. These underground storage tanks meet current regulatory requirements for spill, leak, and corrosion protection.

Oil & Grease Separation

An underground oil water separator tank has been installed in the southwest corner of the tank farm pad. The pad is graded so that all the runoff flows to two slotted drains running east to west that drain to the oil water separator. The runoff flows north to south through the oil water separator which contains a coalescing oil water filter. The filtered water the flows south to the millrace through a storm water pipe.

Hazardous Materials Collection

OEHS provides a waste chemical collection service, which oversees the reducing, reusing, recycling and disposing of hazardous materials. When a hazardous material no longer serves the intended purpose, power plant personnel contact OEHS to coordinate a collection.

Covered Storage or Manufactured Areas

All storage and handling operations have a covering to protect them from the weather. The hogged fuel pile was eliminated in March 1994. The area where the pile was located has been cleaned to prevent possible storm water contamination. The area is now being used as a parking lot.

Spill Prevention and Response Procedures

Given the current prevention controls in place, the most likely spill scenario that would contaminate the storm water would be from oil spillage from a failed pipe fitting. The Utilities Manager has developed an Oil Spill Emergency Response Plan. Due to the measures explained in the Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plan above, adequate preparations for such a spill have been made.

Preventative Maintenance

The Utilities Manager oversees the preventative maintenance schedules, including a checklist used by personnel when making daily walk-through inspections. The maintenance schedules and completed checklists are kept on file in the Utilities Manager's office. As an annual routine maintenance, power plant personnel will coordinate with facilities services support services to remove all debris from catch basins to help insure purity of the storm water runoff.

Employee Awareness Program

The Utilities Manager coordinates on-going training classes for the employees on various subjects, including emergency response procedures relating to hazardous materials (including oil), emergency response plans, the SPCC Plan and the Storm Water Pollution Control Plan.

Record keeping and Internal Reporting Procedures

Since OEHS is responsible for maintaining the permit, it retains the original permit, laboratory results from the two annual storm water samples taken, and the monthly storm water inspection records.

The Utilities Manager maintains all records maintained by OEHS, in addition to maintenance records, temperature, and other internal activity records.

Plan Review

With input from plant personnel and the Utilities Manager, OEHS will review this plan annually and update as necessary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hazardous Materials Emergency Procedures and Contingency Plan

Original Preparation Date Dec 1992

Latest Revision No. 5

Latest Revision Date November, 1998

Computer File G:\envrhlth\document\contplan

 

 

 

Approved by__________________________ Date_________________

Kay Coots, OEHS Director

 

  1. APPENDIX A

XI. APPENDIX B

 

 

 

XII. APPENDIX C