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WHO IS SETA?

We are a local animal rights group dedicated to promoting a peaceful and just world for all animals (humans included). SETA is run by UO students and is open to animal advocates from the community. Join us by contacting seta@uoregon.edu
Check out Blogs by SETA Members

Lauro Pizzo's blog with vegan recipes: http://veganpleasures.blogspot.com/ Megan McClellan's blog: http://sistersvegan.blogspot.com/
Posted by Carrie on 10.9.07



Listen up for the PSA that is playing on UO's campus radio, 88.1 FM that was made by fellow vegan and SETA member "Tim in the Morning" Tim Sutton - player of the lounge tunes - in support of educating students where they can get cage-free eggs on campus and why they should buy them.
Posted by Carrie on 2.4.07



The wikipedia article on veganism is pretty cool and full of a bunch of info. I hadn't previously known the origins of the word vegan til i read it.
Posted by Shawn on 3.6.06



Vegetarian and Vegan Restaurant Guide. vegguide.org
Posted by Lindsay on 1.18.06



See brief article about UO SETA with photos on dmitrivonklein.com.
Posted by Shawn on 12.16.05




Posted by on 4.21.08


Check out Blogs by SETA Members

Lauro Pizzo's blog with vegan recipes: http://veganpleasures.blogspot.com/ Megan McClellan's blog: http://sistersvegan.blogspot.com/
Posted by Carrie on 4.21.08


WHO IS SETA?

We are a local animal rights group dedicated to promoting a peaceful and just world for all animals (humans included). SETA is run by UO students and is open to animal advocates from the community. Join us by contacting seta@uoregon.edu
Posted by Carrie on 10.9.07



Listen up for the PSA that is playing on UO's campus radio, 88.1 FM that was made by fellow vegan and SETA member "Tim in the Morning" Tim Sutton - player of the lounge tunes - in support of educating students where they can get cage-free eggs on campus and why they should buy them.
Posted by Carrie on 2.4.07



The wikipedia article on veganism is pretty cool and full of a bunch of info. I hadn't previously known the origins of the word vegan til i read it.
Posted by Shawn on 3.6.06



Vegetarian and Vegan Restaurant Guide. vegguide.org
Posted by Lindsay on 1.18.06



See brief article about UO SETA with photos on dmitrivonklein.com.
Posted by Shawn on 12.16.05




Posted by on 4.21.08



Posted by Carrie on 4.21.08


WHO IS SETA?

We are a local animal rights group dedicated to promoting a peaceful and just world for all animals (humans included). SETA is run by UO students and is open to animal advocates from the community. Join us by contacting seta@uoregon.edu
Check out Blogs by SETA Members

Lauro Pizzo's blog with vegan recipes: http://veganpleasures.blogspot.com/ Megan McClellan's blog: http://sistersvegan.blogspot.com/
Posted by Carrie on 10.9.07



Listen up for the PSA that is playing on UO's campus radio, 88.1 FM that was made by fellow vegan and SETA member "Tim in the Morning" Tim Sutton - player of the lounge tunes - in support of educating students where they can get cage-free eggs on campus and why they should buy them.
Posted by Carrie on 2.4.07



The wikipedia article on veganism is pretty cool and full of a bunch of info. I hadn't previously known the origins of the word vegan til i read it.
Posted by Shawn on 3.6.06



Vegetarian and Vegan Restaurant Guide. vegguide.org
Posted by Lindsay on 1.18.06



See brief article about UO SETA with photos on dmitrivonklein.com.
Posted by Shawn on 12.16.05




Posted by on 4.21.08


Check out Blogs by SETA Members

Lauro Pizzo's blog with vegan recipes: http://veganpleasures.blogspot.com/ Megan McClellan's blog: http://sistersvegan.blogspot.com/
Posted by Carrie on 4.21.08


WHO IS SETA?

We are a local animal rights group dedicated to promoting a peaceful and just world for all animals (humans included). SETA is run by UO students and is open to animal advocates from the community. Join us by contacting seta@uoregon.edu
Posted by Carrie on 10.9.07



Listen up for the PSA that is playing on UO's campus radio, 88.1 FM that was made by fellow vegan and SETA member "Tim in the Morning" Tim Sutton - player of the lounge tunes - in support of educating students where they can get cage-free eggs on campus and why they should buy them.
Posted by Carrie on 2.4.07



The wikipedia article on veganism is pretty cool and full of a bunch of info. I hadn't previously known the origins of the word vegan til i read it.
Posted by Shawn on 3.6.06



Vegetarian and Vegan Restaurant Guide. vegguide.org
Posted by Lindsay on 1.18.06



See brief article about UO SETA with photos on dmitrivonklein.com.
Posted by Shawn on 12.16.05



NEWS / EVENTS


Press Release: March 12, 2006
For Immediate Release
UO Food Services Investigating Cage-Free Egg Options

   Alec Zimmerman and Carrie Freeman, leaders in the UO group Students for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (SETA), met on March 10th with Tom Driscoll, Director of Food Services, and Allen Gidley, Associate Director of Housing & Director of Business Affairs, regarding SETA’s request that the University of Oregon begin to purchase only cage-free eggs from suppliers who are “Humane Care Certified” according to high standards set by the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS). Zimmerman is providing a list of certified humane suppliers to Driscoll and Gidley, per their request. Driscoll & Gidley stated that the UO is not locked into any contracts with suppliers, and while they do operate under some constraints and a need to be frugal, they are open to investigating alternate egg suppliers to see how these suppliers could meet UO’s needs.

   “If the UO switched to purchasing only cage-free eggs, we could pride ourselves on knowing that these birds were living a decent life, able to spread their wings, nest, dust bath, and forage naturally,” said Alec Zimmerman, SETA co-director and junior at UO. “Additionally, we would not continue to support mega-corporate factory farming and their multitude of environmentally unsustainable practices that exploit the land, the workers, the animals, and threaten to make family farming a thing of the past.” The HSUS considers egg laying hens “arguably the most abused animals in all agribusiness.” They state that “about 95% of the roughly 300 million laying hens in the United States are confined in barren, wire ‘battery cages’ so restrictive the birds don't even have enough space to spread their wings.”

    Because there is almost no federal protection governing the hens’ welfare, the HSUS and other animal protection groups participate in supporting the “Certified Humane” program for responsible farmers www.certifiedhumane.com. These standards place animal welfare as a greater priority than economic gain, so they are stricter and more in line with consumer expectations than the egg industry’s own standards (which used to be labeled “Animal Care Certified” until the FTC requested last year that they switch to the less misleading “United Egg Producer” certified label. More details on this consumer labeling issue at http://www.cok.net/camp/acc/ ).

   Making the switch to cage-free eggs is part of a nationwide trend by major food retailers (like Whole Foods and Wild Oats) and universities towards more socially responsible consumerism. “So far, more than 75 universities have either dramatically increased their use of - or completely switched to - cage-free eggs,” said Josh Balk at the HSUS. “Such universities include Georgetown University, MIT, Yale University, University of Iowa, and George Washington University.” In fact, six other schools in Oregon have made the switch to cage-free, such as Lewis & Clark College, University of Portland, and Willamette University.

   “Switching to cage-free would be a win/win situation for the university, students and staff, humane farmers, birds, and the environment. It fits with the socially and ecologically responsible mission and conscience of the university and its students,” stated SETA member and UO doctoral student Carrie Freeman. “If entire nations across Europe can ban battery cages and go cruelty-free, then I’m optimistic that the UO certainly can as well!”

 

SETA Contacts:

Carrie Freeman, cfreema2@uoregon.edu
Alec Zimmerman, azimmerm@uoregon.edu
HSUS Contacts: Josh Balk, jbalk@hsus.org
Outreach Coordinator, Factory Farming Campaign, HSUS.

Please see our Cage-Free campaign page on this website for more facts and links to more information and photos/videos.

 

Below is the original letter SETA sent to UO President Frohnmayer in early February which resulted in the meeting with the Housing and Food Services Directors:

Dear Pres. Frohnmayer:

   We are writing on behalf of the newly re-energized UO animal protection group, Students for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (SETA), to introduce ourselves as the new co-directors and to ask for your support on an important campus campaign for cage-free eggs. Currently, the university purchases “battery cage” eggs from hens kept crowded in intensive confinement operations, which are condemned as cruel by the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS). We would like to assist the University in improving this situation and switching to an alternate supplier who purchases from sustainable farmers who are Humane-Care certified per HSUS guidelines.

   The enclosed brochure outlines the many ways that battery caged hens are mistreated in modern day factory farms. These miserable conditions are a far cry from what most Americans would describe as humane or natural. If the UO switched to purchasing only cage-free eggs, we could pride ourselves on knowing that these birds were living a decent life, able to spread their wings, nest, dust bath, and forage naturally. Additionally, we would not be supporting corporate agribusiness and their multitude of environmentally unsustainable practices that exploit the land, the workers, the animals, and threaten to make family farming a thing of the past.

   If the University of Oregon were to make this positive change under your leadership, you would be following in the footsteps of dozens of other colleges who have worked with the HSUS and made the switch to cage-free eggs, such as George Washington University, Vassar College, Marist College, American University, and MIT. This is following a general U.S. trend towards going cage-free, as seen in organizations like: Whole Foods, Wild Oats, Earth Fare, Trader Joes and major food-service provider Bon-Appetit. In recent years, the European Union has sought to eradicate the cruelty inherent in factory farming by instituting an EU-wide phase-out of battery cages by 2012.

    If the entire European Union can do it – We can do it at UO! With this improvement, the University of Oregon can continue to live up to its reputation as an environmentally and socially responsible institution that prides itself on high ethical standards, a commitment which is evidenced in your many speeches on ethics. Going cage-free and supporting sustainable humane farming would be a wonderful part of your legacy of leadership at the University of Oregon.

    We would love to meet with you next week, at your convenience, to discuss how SETA and the HSUS may assist UO Food Services in investigating alternative suppliers to further consider this cage-free proposal. We look forward to hearing from your office, and we appreciate your help and consideration. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Alec Zimmerman and Lindsay Riddell Co-Directors, Students for the Ethical Treatment of Animals University of Oregon