FINAL SPRING 2009 CURRICULUM REPORT

 

OVERVIEW

 

The body of this report consists of two major sections: Course Proposals reviewed spring 2009 and Other Curricular Matters. Policies and definitions governing group and multicultural general-education requirements are under Other Curricular Matters.

 

Course proposals approved by both the University of Oregon Committee on Courses (UOCC) and the University Senate are effective fall term 2009, unless a specific term is requested by an academic department and stated otherwise in this report.

 

The UOCC will consider new proposals during fall term and will submit a fall quarterly report to the University Senate in December 2009.

 

Routing of Minor Changes: The UOCC has confirmed that the following minor course changes may be made without review by the full committee: minor edits of course description, pre- or co-requisites, grading option, and conditions of repeatability. Changes may be submitted in writing directly to the Office of the Registrar and Creative Publishing, in care of Mike Jefferis (jefferis@uoregon.edu) and Scott Skelton (sskelton@uoregon.edu). The memorandum should indicate the effective term for the change(s). Note: extensive changes may be referred to the UOCC for review.

 

Courses Not Taught Report: The UOCC has changed the policy of dropping courses not taught within the past three years from the fall curriculum report to the spring curriculum report. This allows the correct listing of courses in the catalog for the following curricular year. The intention for this change is to allow departments a chance to reply earlier and provide a more thoughtful response while still involved in curricular planning and staffing for the next academic year and can best determine which courses they are able to offer.

 

 

LOOKING AHEAD

 

Academic Year 2009-2010

September 16, 2009:          Curricular proposals for consideration in the fall 2009 round must be submitted to the provost’s office.

November 25, 2009:           University Senate considers fall 2009 preliminary report of the University of Oregon Committee on Courses.

December 16, 2009:            Curricular proposals for consideration in the winter 2010 round must be submitted to the provost’s office.

March 10, 2010:     University Senate considers winter 2010 preliminary report of the University of Oregon Committee on Courses.

March 17, 2010:     Curricular proposals for consideration in the spring 2010 round must be submitted to the provost’s office.

May 12, 2010:         University Senate considers spring 2010 preliminary report of the University of Oregon Committee on Courses.

 

Motion

 

The University of Oregon Committee on Courses moves that the following course proposals and other curricular matters be approved.

 

Voting:     Paul Engelking, Chair                   Ex officio:     Sue Eveland

                  Jack Boss                                                            John Crosiar

                  Emma Martin                                                       Marian Friestad

                  Shlomo Libeskind                                                Andrew Wahlstrom     

                  Frances White                                                      Scott Skelton

                  Jens Noeckel                                                       

 

Student:                                                         Staff:             Tami Oar

                                                                                               Mike Jefferis

__________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Unless indicated otherwise, courses may be taken either pass/no pass or for letter grades. “P/N only” or “graded only” indicates that all students must take the course as specified in the bold print. Separate grading options for majors are bracketed in this report and appear in UO class schedule notes; they are not printed in the UO Catalog. R after course credits means that the course number may be repeated for credit. “Sequence” after the description means the courses must be taken in numerical order.

College of Arts and Sciences

 

anthropology

 

REINSTATED Courses

 

ANTH 572 Primate Conservation Biology (4) Evaluates the conservation status of the order Primates. Explores biological-ecological issues and social-cultural influences on primate biodiversity, distribution, and abundance.

 

OLD COURSES DROPPED

                    

ANTH 174 Anthropology of Food and Health (4)

 

EXISTING COURSE CHANGES

 

ANTH 350 Ancient Mesoamerica (4)

(Changed Course Title)

ANTH 350 Olmec, Maya, and Aztec Societies(4)

Continues to satisfy Social Science group requirement.

Continues to satisfy International Cultures multicultural requirement.

 

 

 

 

ANTH 462/562 Paleoprimatology (4)

Prereq: ANTH 361.

(Change Course Title, Prerequisite)

ANTH 462/562 Primate Evolution (4)

Prereq: ANTH 270.

 

 

NEW COURSES

 

ANTH 175 Evolutionary Medicine (4) Focuses on the application of evolutionary thinking to the study of human health and disease.

Approved to satisfy Science group requirement.

 

(Course previously taught as ANTH 310)

ANTH 322 Anthropology of the United States (4) Explores the culture and the political economy of the contemporary United States, with a particular focus on race, class, and gender relations.

Pre- or coreq: ANTH 161. Offered alternate years.

Approved to satisfy American Cultures multicultural requirement.

 

(Course previously taught as ANTH 407/507)

ANTH 487/587 Bioanthropology Methods (4) Laboratory-based introduction to research methods in biological anthropology, with an emphasis on research among living human populations. Prereq: ANTH 270 Offered alternate years.

 

Biology

 

Existing Course Changes

 

(UOCC administrative action)

BI 251 Foundations I: Biochemistry and Cell Physiology (5) Prereq: CH 223 or 226H. Pre- or coreq: CH 331.

(change pre-requisite)

BI 251 Foundations I: Biochemistry and Cell Physiology (5) Prereq: CH 223 or 226H.

 

chemistry

 

OLD COURSES DROPPED

 

CH 664 Physical Biochemistry (4)

 

NEW COURSES

 

(Course previously taught as 664)

CH 465/565 Physical Biochemistry (4) Physical chemical properties of biological macromolecules; forces and interactions to establish and maintain macromolecular conformations; physical bases of spectroscopic, hydrodynamic, and rapid-reaction investigative techniques. Prereq MATH 253, CH 461. Offered alternate years.

 

 

english

 

OLD COURSES DROPPED

 

ENG 250 Introduction to Folklore (4)

Prefix change to FLR (Folklore Program)

Previously satisfied Arts and Letters group requirement.

Previously satisfied Identity, Pluralism and Tolerance multicultural requirement.

 

ENG 255 Folklore and United States Popular Culture (4)

Change in prefix to FLR (Folklore Program)

 

ENG 484/584 American Folklore (4)

Change in prefix to FLR (Folklore Program)

Previously satisfied American Cultures multicultural requirement.

 

NEW COURSES

 

ENG 267 History of the Motion Picture (4) [Graded only for majors] Studies the historical evolution of cinema as an institution and art form from its origins to present. Sequence with ENG 265 and 266.

Approved to satisfy Arts and Letters group requirement.

 

ENG 270 Introduction to Narrative Cinema Production (4) [Graded only for majors] Focuses on basic theory and practice of digital video for narrative production.

 

 

folklore program

 

NEW COURSES

 

(Course previously taught as ENG 250)

FLR 250 Introduction to Folklore (4) [Graded only for majors] The process and genres of traditional (i.e., folk) patterning; the relations between these forms of expression and other arts, especially English and American literature.

Approved to satisfy Arts and Letters group requirement.

Approved to satisfy Identity, Pluralism and Tolerance multicultural requirement.

 

(Course previously taught as ENG 255)

FLR 255 Folklore and United States Popular Culture (4) [Graded only for majors] Explores the relationship between folklore and popular culture, with special emphasis on the analysis of legends, myths, icons, stereotypes, heroes, celebrities, rituals, and celebrations.

Approved to satisfy Arts and Letters group requirement.

Approved to satisfy Identity, Pluralism and Tolerance multicultural requirement.

 

(Course previously taught as ENG 485/584)

FLR 484/584 American Folklore (4) [Graded only for majors] Surveys current American folklore and expressive culture, and analyzes its connections to historical periods, cultural experiences, and social identities. Offered alternate years. Prereq: junior standing

FLR 484 Approved to satisfy American Cultures multicultural requirement.

 

 

latin american studies program

 

NEW COURSES

 

LAS 200 Introduction to Latin American Studies (4) [Graded only for majors] Introduction to the history, peoples, and cultures of Latin America and of the Latino population in the U.S.

Approved to satisfy International Cultures multicultural requirement.

 

LAS 211 Latin American Humanities: [Topic] (4R) [Graded only for majors] Focuses on the comparative study of Latin American cultural and intellectual traditions. Introduces scholarship in the humanities about Latin American and U.S.Latinos. Prereq: LAS 200 Repeatable once for a maximum of 8 credits when topic changes.

Approved to satisfy International Cultures multicultural requirement.

 

LAS 212 Latin American Social Sciences: [Topic] (4R) [Graded only for majors] Addresses various issues related to the historical, political, cultural and economic development of Latin America from a social science perspective. Prereq: LAS 200. Repeatable once for a maximum of 8 credits when topic changes..

Approved to satisfy International Cultures multicultural requirement.

 

political science

 

NEW COURSES

 

(Course previously taught as PS 399)

PS 388 Mafia and Corruption in Russia (4) [Graded only for majors] Focuses on the Mafia, corruption, and organized crime as integral parts of Russia's transition to democracy, and their relationships with the state.

Approved to satisfy International Cultures multicultural requirement.

 

psychology

 

NEW COURSES

 

(Course previously taught as PSY 410/510)

PSY 461/561 Imagination (4) Topics in human imagination, including creativity, children's pretend play, fiction writing, imagery, mental time travel, consciousness, dreaming, virtual worlds, and disorders of the imagination. Prereq: WR 121, 122, PSY 303.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

womens and gender studies program

 

NEW COURSES

 

(Course previously taught as 199)

WGS 201 Introduction to Queer Studies (4) [Graded only for majors] Introduction to the study of sexuality and society from a queer studies interdisciplinary perspective.

Approved to satisfy Identity, Pluralism and Tolerance multicultural requirement.

WGS 303 Women and Gender in American History (4) [Graded only for majors] Focuses on women and gender in America, highlighting how diverse women have experienced gender roles and sexism since the 17th century.

Approved to satisfy Identity, Pluralism and Tolerance multicultural requirement.

 

 

PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES

 

School of Architecture and Allied Arts



Art History

 

Reinstated Courses

 

(UOCC administrative action)

ARH 344 Northern Baroque Art (4)

 

landscape architecture

 

REINSTATED COURSES

 

LA 480/580 Landscape Preservation (4)

 

LA 482/582 National Parks (4)

 

 

planning, public policy and management

 

OLD COURSES DROPPED

 

PPPM 424/524 Public and Nonprofit Financial Management (4)

 

Existing Courses

 

(UOCC administrative action)

PPPM 404 Internship: [Topic] (1-18R)

(change credits)

PPPM 404 Internship: [Topic] (1-12R)

 

(UOCC administrative action)

PPPM 604 Internship: [Topic] (1-16R)

(change credits)

PPPM 604 Internship: [Topic] (1-10R)

 

 

NEW COURSES

 

(Course previously taught as 407)

PPPM 445/545 Green Cities (4) Examines the history and future of the interface between urban growth and environmental concerns and the technological, social, and political forces that continue to shape it.

 

(Course previously taught as 424/524)

PPPM 484 Public and Nonprofit Financial Management (4) Introduction to financial management for public agencies and nonprofit organizations. Topics include budget processes, financial statements, financial resource management (taxes, donations, grants), expenditure systems, and capital project analysis.

 

(Course previously taught as 424/524)

PPPM 684 Public and Nonprofit Financial Management (4) Financial management overview for public agencies and nonprofits, including budget processes, financial statements, resource management, expenditure systems, capital project analysis, and internal management control processes.

 

(Course previously taught as 620)

PPPM 657 Research Methods in Public Policy and Management (4) Survey of research methods used in the analysis of public policy issues. Emphasis is on determining the appropriate methodology for a given research question. Prereq: PPPM 656.

 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS

 

NEW COURSES

 

(Course previously taught as 410/510)

ARCH 431/531 Community Design (3) Multidisciplinary examination of the history, theory, and practice in the design and development of meaningful and sustainable neighborhoods. Special focus selected by faculty. Prereq: junior standing. Open to all majors. Offered alternate years.

 

ARCH 476/576 Residential Construction (4) Provides an understanding of basic materials and methods of North American residential construction with emphasis on design and construction of the wood light frame.

 

 

LUNDQUIST COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

 

EXISTING COURSE CHANGES

 

MGMT 455 Business Planning for Entrepreneurs (4)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title)

MGMT 455 Implementing Entrepreneurial Strategies (4) Focuses on turning an idea into a serious business venture. Students research new business opportunities and become skilled in developing business tools and processes to carry out venture launch strategies. Prereq: MGMT 335, ACTG 340, MKTG 445.

 

 

 

College of Education

 

 

Counseling Psychology and human services

 

EXISTING COURSE CHANGES

 

(UOCC administrative action)

FHS 491 Junior Professional Practices and Issues I (3) grading option Pass/No Pass only

(changed grading option)

FHS 491 Junior Professional Practices and Issues I (3) [Grading only]

 

(UOCC administrative action)

FHS 492 Junior Professional Practices and Issues II (3) [Pass/No Pass only]

(changed grading option)

FHS 492 Junior Professional Practices and Issues II (3) [Graded only]

 

(UOCC administrative action)

FHS 493 Junior Professional Practices and Issues III (3) [Pass/No Pass only]

(changed grading option)

FHS 493 Junior Professional Practices and Issues III (3) [Graded only]

 

 

Teacher Education

 

OLD COURSES DROPPED

 

EDST 114 Communication Using Computers (4)

 

EDST 212 Foundations of Learning and Intervention (4)

 

EDST 213 Applications of Learning and Intervention (4)

 

EDST 312 Introduction to Educational Research (4)

 

EDST 313 Evaluation for Decision Making (4)

 

EDST 411/511 Early Childhood and Preadolescent Development (3)

 

EDST 442 Curriculum and Teaching Design (3)

 

EDST 445 Early Language, reading, and Literacy (4)

 

EDST 446 Mathematics Instruction Principles and Procedures (3)

 

GET All Courses – Old Prefix Dropped

 

MSEC All Courses – Old Prefix Dropped

 

TED All Courses – Old Prefix Dropped

 

Physical Education and Recreation

 

 

physical education and recreation

 

OLD COURSES DROPPED

 

PEIA 336 Wrestling (M) (1R)

 

PEMA 246 Wrestling I (1R)

 

PEMA 247 Wrestling II (1R)

 

PEMA 248 Wrestling III (1R)

 

PEOL 352 Backpacking II Outing (1R)

 

PEOW 211 Sailing I (1R)

 

PEOW 212 Sailing II (1R)

 

EXISTING COURSE CHANGES

 

PEAQ 213 Learn to Lap Swim (1R)

(Changed Course Title, Course Number)

PEAQ 202 Swimming II (1R)

 

PEAQ 221 Swim Conditioning I

(Changed Prerequisites)

PEAQ 221 Swim Conditioning I (2R)

Prereq: PEAQ 202 or equivalent.

 

PEOL 351 Backpacking I Outing (1R)

(Changed Course Title, Credits/Workload, Fee)

PEOL 351 Backpacking (2R)

 

PEOL 356 Backcountry Navigation Outing (1R)

(Changed Course Title, Credits/Workload, Fee)

PEOL 356 Backcountry Navigation (2R)

 

PEOL 366 High-Angle Rescue (1R)

(Changed Course Title, Credits/Workload, Fee)

PEOL 366 Vertical Rescue Techniques (2R)

 

PEOL 371 Snow camp I Outing (1R)

(Changed Course Title, Credits/Workload, Fee)

PEOL 371 Snow Camping (2R)

 

PEOL 391 Avalanche Safety Outing (1R)

(Changed Course Title, Credits/Workload, Fee)

PEOL 391 Avalanche Safety (2R)

 

NEW COURSES

 

PEAQ 201 Swimming I (1R) P/NP only. A beginning swim course for the non-swimmer and those who need fundamental stroke work in freestyle, back stroke, and breast stroke. Sequence: Swimming II. R All PE courses are repeatable once for credit.

 

(Course previously taught as 399)

PEAS 390 Scuba Instructor (2R) P/NP only. This final course in the SCUBA series prepares, and possibly certifies, the student to become a SCUBA Instructor. Sequence: Basic, Advanced, Rescue, Night, Altitude, Nitrox, Equipment, Dive Master 1&2. Prereq: PEAS 382 or equivalent. R All PE courses are repeatable once for credit.

 

PEIA 305 Team Stunts (1R) P/NP only. Varsity athletes may earn a PE credit for their team workouts during their competitive season. Prereq: Must be a varsity team member. R All PE activity courses are repeatable once for credit.

 

PEIA 342 Baseball (1R) P/NP only. Varsity athletes may earn a PE credit for their team workouts during their competitive season. Prereq: Must be a varsity team member. R All PE activity courses are repeatable once for credit.

 

(Course previously taught as 199)

PEMA 116 Women’s Self Defense (1R) P/NP only. Basic strategies and techniques with specific attention to escaping dangerous situations and creating an advantage when thrown to the ground. R All PE courses are repeatable once for credit.

 

(Course previously taught as 199)

PEMA 255 Kickboxing (1R) P/NP only. This dynamic martial art includes punching and kicking skills, techniques and the rules of competitive kickboxing. Develops balance, flexibility and strength. R All PE courses are repeatable once for credit.

 

(Course previously taught as 199)

PEMB 230 Sports Yoga (1-2R) P/NP only. Covers important yogic concepts and practices for athletes. Improve your flexibility and strength as you learn yoga techniques, practice, and philosophy. R All PE activity courses are repeatable once for credit.

 

PEOL 315 Basics of Technical Rescue (1R) P/NP only. Basic technical rescue skills: knots, rope management, belaying, rappelling, transporting an injured climber, lowering, raising and improvised rescue techniques. Prereq: PEOL 251 or equiv experience. R All PE courses are repeatable once for credit.

 

(Course previously taught as 297 and 298)

PEOL 331 Rock Climbing III (2R) P/NP only. Introduction to anchor building, basic rescue techniques, and outdoor climbing in the context of classroom sessions and a 3-day outing to Smith Rock. Sequence: PEOL 251 or equiv experience Prereq: PEOL 251 or equiv experience. R All PE courses are repeatable once for credit.

 

PEOL 373 Cascade Traverse (2R) P/NP only. Students travel across a section of the Oregon Cascades on snowshoes, reinforcing winter travel and navigation skills during a challenging 3-day outing. Prereq: PEOL 285, 351, and 371 or equiv experience. R All PE courses are repeatable once for credit.

 

PEOW 325 Swift-Water Safety (1R) P/NP only. Covers methods of crossing shallow and deep swift-water streams. Includes hazard assessment, swimming techniques, knots, rope work, technical systems, pendulum and Tyrolean traverse crossings. Prereq: PEOL 285 and basic swimming ability. R All PE courses are repeatable once for credit.

 

 

School of journalism and communication

 

 

journalism

 

OLD COURSES DROPPED

 

J 386 Communications Economics (4)

 

J 388 Communication Theory and Criticism (4)

 

J 417 Public Media and Culture (4)

 

J 418/518 Communication and Democracy (4)

 

J 441/541 Advertising Copy Writing (4)

 

J 442/542 Advertising Layout (4)

 

J 446/546 Advertising and Society (4)

 

J 447/547 Advertising Portfolio (4)

 

J 451/551 Advertising Strategy (4)

 

J 455/555 Third World Development Communication (4)

 

J 492/592 International Journalism (4)

 

EXISTING COURSE CHANGES

 

J 101 Grammar for Journalists (3)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title, Credits/Workload)

J 101 Grammar for Communicators (2)

Intensive review of grammar, word use, spelling, and principles of clear, concise writing. Introduction to media style. Blaine.

 

J 201 The Mass Media and Society (4)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title)

J 201 Media and Society (4)

Introduction to the critical examination of the roles of media in society. Martinez, Merskin, Gangadharbatla, Gallicano.

 

J 314 Introduction to Communication Studies (4)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title, Credits/Workload)

J 314 Introduction to Media Studies (3-4)

Presents a historical overview of the study of media, with in-depth discussion of primary theoretical approaches and their application to the current media environment. Prereq: J 201. Bybee, Merskin, Steeves, Wasko.

 

J 331 Television Field Production (4)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title)

J 331 Digital Video Production (4)

Prereq: J 330. Martinez, Miller, Force.

 

J 350 Principles of Public Relations (4)

(Changed Course Description)

Overview of public relations practice in a diverse global society, including theory, career opportunities, history, communication forms and channels, and legal and ethical concerns. Majors only. Curtin, Gallicano.

 

J 361 Reporting I (4)

(Changed Course Description)

News gathering and writing. Extensive writing in class and outside of class in a variety of forms: news, features, interviews, multi-media scripts. Journalism majors only. Maier, Force, Werner.

 

J 365 Photojournalism (4)

(Changed Course Description)

Visual reporting techniques, with emphasis on practice, law, and ethics of photojournalism and photographic communication. Laboratory-and portfolio-intensive. Majors only. Newton, Ryan.

 

J 371 Magazine Article Writing I (4)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title)

J 371 Feature Writing I (4)

Introduction to feature writing for print and online media; marketing your ideas and stories. Prereq: J-361. Majors only. Bassett, Blaine, Wheeler.

 

J 397 Mass Media Ethics (4)

(Changed Course Title)

J 397 Media Ethics (4)

 

J 421/521 Documentary Television Production (4)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title)

J 421/521 Documentary Production (4)

Workshop in preparation, shooting, and postproduction of the short documentary. Journalism majors only. Prereqs: Journalism 331, 432/532, Miller, Palfreman.

 

J 432/532 Reporting for Electronic Media (4)

(Changed Course Description)

Prereq: J 331. Majors only. Palfreman, Force, Upshaw.

 

J 440 Public Relations Writing (4)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title)

J 440 Strategic Writing and Media Relations (4)

Writing-intensive lab, to produce strategic theory-based content for multiple media platforms using various journalistic styles and storytelling skills, and incorporating ethical media relations practices. Prereq: J350. Majors only. Curtin, Hagley.

 

J 452/552 Advanced Public Relations Writing (4)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title)

J 452/552 Strategic Public Relations Communication (4)

Advanced writing lab emphasizing business communication, direct-to-consumer strategies and techniques, and effective use of Web-based communication strategies. Gallicano, Hagley.

Prereq: J440. Majors only.

 

J 453/553 Public Relations Planning and Problems (4)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title)

J 453/553 Strategic Planning and Cases

Campaign planning, administration, crisis communication, and issues management, encompassing research, writing objectives and tactics, evaluation methods, and constructing budgets and timelines. Prereq: J440. Majors only. Curtin, Callicano, Hagley.

 

J 454/554 Public Relations Campaigns and Case Studies (4)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title, Prerequisites.)

J 454/554 Public Relations Campaigns (4)

Capstone course applying theory, skills, and a team-based approach to researching, planning, presenting, and implementing a campaign for a client. Professional portfolios presented and reviewed. Pre- or coreqs: J 452/552, J 453/553, J 495/595. Curtin, Gallicano, Hagley.

 

J 461/561 Newspaper Editing (4)

(Changed Course Description)

Copy-editing, headline writing, and page design for newspapers in print and online; emphasis on grammar and style. Journalism majors only.

Prereq: J 361 or equivalent.

 

J 472/572 Feature Writing II (4)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title)

J 472/572 Feature Writing II (4)

In-depth story research and advanced feature writing for print and online markets. Individual conferences.

Prereq: J 371. Majors only. Bassett, Blaine, Kessler, Wheeler.

 

J 473/573 Magazine Feature Editing (4)

(Changed Course Description)

J 473/573 Magazine Feature Editing (4)

In-depth story research and advanced feature writing for print and online markets. Individual conferences.

Prereq: J 371. Majors only. Bassett, Blaine, Kessler, Wheeler.

 

J 474/574 The Magazine Editor (4)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title)

J 474/574 Magazine Industry and Strategies (4)

How editors plan issues and interact with colleagues in circulation, graphics, production, and advertising, trends, strategies, and ethics.

Prereq: J 371. Majors only.

 

J 476/576 Magazine Design and Production (4)

(Changed Course Description)

Issues and techniques in picture editing, typography, and work picture composition for long-form visual storytelling across media platforms.

Prereq: instructor’s consent.

 

J 495/595 Strategic Communication Research Methods (4)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title, Repeatability)

J 495/595 Research Methods: [Topic] (4R)

Uses a variety of quantitative and qualitative methods to examine concepts and processes of research used in such areas as advertising, public relations, journalism, and communication studies. R when topic changes for a maximum of 12 credits. Offered once or more per academic year. Prereq: junior standing.

 

 

NEW COURSES

 

(Course previously taught as J 199)

J 100 Media Professions (2) Introduction to dynamic media and communication professions, opportunities, and issues, as well as to majors in journalism and communication. Sequence: with J 101, J 201.

 

(Course previously taught as 410)

J 205 Gateway to Media I (4) Integrates critical thinking with professional media skills needed for nonfiction storytelling in a multimedia environment. Sequence: with J 206 and J 207.

Majors only.

 

(Course previously taught as 410)

J 206 Gateway to Media II (4) Integrates critical thinking, creative thinking and basic skills for nonfiction storytelling through words, photos, audio and video. Sequence: with J 205 and J 207. Majors only.

 

(Course previously taught as J410)

J 207 Gateway to Media III (4) Integrates critical thinking and intermediate nonfiction storytelling across media platforms. Sequence: with J 205 and J 206.

Majors only.

 

J 456/556 The Creative Strategist (4) Graded only. Creative approaches to ideation and strategic thinking for all advertising specialties. Emphasis: creative process, generative techniques, teamwork, career planning, industry trends. Prereq: J 340.

 

(Course previously taught as J408)

J 457/557 Curiosity for Strategists (4) Graded only. Explore the building of intellectual curiosity as a problem-solving technique within the context of culture and media. Emphasis: critical thinking, readings, projects, performance. Prereq: J 340.

 

(Course previously taught as J410)

J 458/558 Writing Design Concepts (4) Graded only. Conceptual problem-solving for traditional and emerging media. Emphasis: conceptual development, advertising writing, design, campaigns, presentation of developed work. For JAD majors; other journalism majors by consent. Prereq: J 340.

 

(Course previously taught as J410)

J 459/559 Branding and Content (4) Graded only. Capstone course on brand portfolio development for writers, art directors, nd strategists. Emphasis: production, multiple-platform creative development, industry focused portfolios. For JAD majors only. Prereq: J 340, J 458.

 

J 460/560 Brand Development: [Topic] (4R) Graded only. Revolving topics on emerging issues in branding and advertising. Prereq: J 340. Repeatable when topic changes.

 

(Course previously taught as 410/510)

J 466/566 Advanced Photojournalism:[Topic] (4R) [Graded only for majors] Intensive visual reporting techniques, with emphasis on digital production, color, lighting, in-depth storytelling, documentary and portfolio. Prereq: J 365. Majors only. Repeatable when topic changes.

 

J 467/567 Issues in International Communication: [Topic] (4R) [Graded only for majors] Topics focus on global media issues. Prereq: R when topic changes.

 

 

School of Music and Dance

 

music

 

OLD COURSES DROPPED

 

MUS 464/564 Piano Literature (3)

 

MUS 465/565 Piano Literature (3)

 

MUS 466/566 Piano Literature (3)

 

MUS 687 Performance Practices Before 1850

 

MUS 688 Performance Practices Before 1850

 

EXISTING COURSE CHANGES

 

MUP 199 Special Studies: [Topic] (1-5R)

(Changed Course Description)

MUP 199 Special Studies: [Topic] (1-5R)

[No Description]

 

MUS 391 Collegium Musicum (1)

(Changed Credits/Workload)

MUS 391 Collegium Musicum (1-3R)

Effective summer 2009.

 

MUS 691 Collegium Musicum (1)

(Changed Credits/Workload)

MUS 691 Collegium Musicum (1-3R)

Effective summer 2009.

 

 

NEW COURSES

 

(Course previously taught as MUJ 507)

MUJ 660 Survey of Jazz Composition (3) Graded only. Overview of important developments and historically significant figures in jazz composition and arranging. Analysis of their music and stylistic traits.

 

MUJ 661 Jazz Program Planning and Development (3) Designing and nurturing a successful jazz program. Jazz curriculum, grant writing, budgets, resources, organizing student support, setting and reaching program goals.

 

MUP 162 Performance Studies: [Topic] (1-5R) [Graded only for majors] Recent topics include Beatles Guitar Music, Folk Harp, Jazz Drumset, Table, Tuba and Euphonium Routine, Breathing Technique. R when topic changes.

 

MUP 362 Performance Studies: [Topic] (1-5R) [Graded only for majors] Recent topics include Beatles Guitar Music, Folk Harp, Jazz Drumset, Tabla, Tuba and Euphonium Routine, Breathing Technique. R when topic changes.

 

MUP 662 Advanced Special Studies: [Topic] (1-5R) [Graded only for majors] Recent topics include Beatles Guitar Music, Folk Harp, Jazz Drumset, Tabla, Tuba and Euphonium Routine, Breathing Technique. R when topic changes.

 

(Course previously taught as MUS 564, 565, 566)

MUS 650 Piano Literature (3) Graded only. Advanced study of solo piano literature from Bach to the present. Sequence: MUS 650, 651, 652. Offered alternate years.

 

(Course previously taught as MUS 564, 565, 566)

MUS 651 Piano Literature (3) Graded only. Advanced study of solo piano literature from Bach to the present. Sequence: MUS 650, 651, 652. Offered alternate years. Prereq: MUS 650

 

(Course previously taught as MUS 564, 565, 566)

MUS 652 Piano Literature (3) Graded only. Advanced study of solo piano literature from Bach to the present. Sequence: MUS 650, 651, 652. Offered alternate years. Prereq: MUS 651

 

(Course previously taught at MUS 687)

MUS 680 Historical Performance Practices I (3) [Graded only for majors]

Introduction to theory and practice of sound production, rhetoric, pronunciation, instrumentation, pitch, temperament, and ornamentation in period vocal and instrumental solo and ensemble music. 680: 12th through 16th centuries. 681: 17th and early 18th centuries. 682: Late 18th and 19th centuries. Vanscheeuwijck.

Offered once every third year.

 

(Course previously taught at MUS 688)

MUS 681 Historical Performance Practices II (3) [Graded only for majors]

Introduction to theory and practice of sound production, rhetoric, pronunciation, instrumentation, pitch, temperament, and ornamentation in period vocal and instrumental solo and ensemble music. 680: 12th through 16th centuries. 681: 17th and early 18th centuries. 682: Late 18th and 19th centuries. Vanscheeuwijck.

Offered once every third year.

 

MUS 682 Historical Performance Practices III (3) [Graded only for majors] Introduction to theory and practice of sound production, rhetoric, pronunciation, instrumentation, pitch, temperament, and ornamentation in period vocal and instrumental solo and ensemble music.680: 12th through 16th centuries. 681: 17th and early 18th centuries. 682: Late 18th and 19th centuries. Vanscheeuwijck.

Offered once every third year.

 

 

Honors College

 

OLD COURSES DROPPED

 

(UOCC Administrative Action)

HC 508H Colloquium: [Topic] (1-21R)

 

EXISTING COURSE CHANGES

 

(UOCC Administrative Action)

HC 408H Colloquium: [Topic] (1-21R)

(Change title, change credits)

HC 408H Workshop: [Topic] (1-21R)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Curricular Matters

                                               

College of Arts and Sciences

 

A minor in European Studies has been approved by the Undergraduate Council and the Provost, effective Fall Term 2009.

 

The Women and Gender Studies Program has received approval from the provost, on recommendation from the Undergraduate Council, to revise its major and reduce the number of credit hours required to satisfy the major. Effective fall 2009.

 

 

School of Architecture and Allied Arts

 

1)    Change the name (and major code) of the graduate certificate program from Not-for-Profit Management (NFPM) to Nonprofit Management (NPM). Approved by Graduate Council on May 21, 2008.

 

2)    Change the name (and major code) from Public Policy and Management (PPM) to Public Administration (MPA) for the Master of Public Administration program. Approved by the Graduate Council on May 21, 2008. Effective fall 2009.

 

Lundquist College of Business

 

Correction: there were errors in the text of the Winter 2009 Final Curriculum report in the “Other Matters” section under the Lundquist College of Business regarding changes in the MBA major designation and codes. The Winter 2009 text is null and void. The correct text reads as follows:

 

 

The Lundquist College of Business received approval from the Provost, on recommendation from the Graduate Council, to change the on-campus MBA major designation and associated code names from the campus-based Masters of Business Administration’s (MBA) major designation as “Management: General Business (MGB)” to General Business (GB).The Oregon Executive MBA major will also use the General Business major designation but will be distinguished from the on-campus MBA by the code “GBE." Effective fall term 2009.

 

 

Academic Resources

 

Name Change:

 

Academic Learning Services has received approval from the provost, on recommendation from the Undergraduate Council, to change its name to the University Teaching and Learning Center. Effective fall 2009.

 

 

 

 

DENIED PROPOSALS

 

PENDING PROPOSALS

 

GEOLOGY

 

NEW COURSE

 

GEOL 458/558 Tectonics of the Western United States: (4) [Graded only for majors]

Tectonic evolution of the western United States lithosphere. Includes geologic history, tectonic events, analogies from around the world and current active processes.

 

POLITICAL SCIENCE

 

(Course previously taught as PS 399)

PS 378 Games in Politics (4) [Graded only for majors] Politics can be viewed as strategic interactions among politicians, voters, countries, etc. Course focuses on how to model these interactions, using tools of "Game Theory".

 

ARCHITECTURE

 

(Course previously taught as 410/510)

ARCH 438/538 Housing Prototypes (3) An examination of modern housing prototypes (1920s-present) with an emphasis on understanding the many and varied factors involved in the production of quality housing. Prereq: Junior standing. Open to all majors.

 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

 

(Course previously taught as 610 in Fall 2007)

LA 617 Introduction to Landscape Architecture Theory (4) P/NP only. Survey and critique of the theoretical frameworks, prevalent ways of knowing, ways of expanding understanding, and argument in landscape architecture.

 

 

art

 

OLD COURSES DROPPED

 

ARTF 253 Off-Loom Textiles (3R)

restructuring the fibers curriculum

 

ARTF 267 Weaving (3)

restructuring fibers curriculum

 

 

ARTF 458/558 Textile Printing (3R)

restructuring the fibers curriculum

 

EXISTING COURSE CHANGES

 

ART 115 Basic Design: Fundamentals (4)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title, Grading Options)

ART 115 Surface, Space, and Time

Introduces interdisciplinary media processes, critical theory, formal communication design, color theory, skills in objective evaluation and critique, and how materials, processes and context establish meaning.

UO grading option: Graded Only

Majors grading option: Graded Only

 

ART 116 Basic Design:3D (4)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title)

ART 116 CORE Interdisciplinary Laboratory

Rigorous studio projects in the Core STUDIO sequence stressing interdisciplinary media transitions and the inter-relatedness of conceptual and formal concerns.

Pre/corequisite(s): ART 115

 

ART 233 Drawing (4)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title)

ART 233 Drawing I

An introduction to basic drawing concepts and practices.

 

ARTF 456/556 Advanced Fibers (3-5R)

(Changed Course Description, Course Title)

ARTF 456/556 Adv Fibers: Craft & Textile Construction

Course emphasizes development of individual studio practice through an exploration of contemporary issues in textile-based processes and an expansion of the rhetoric of craft.

Course will be taught Once or more per academic year

Pre/corequisite(s): ARTF 368; and 267 or 369

 

 

NEW COURSES

 

ART 333 Drawing II (4) Building on previous drawing skills, course emphasizes synthesis of ideas and approaches, complex subjects, investigation and expression. Sequence: ART 233 Prereq: ART 233

 

ARTD 256 Introduction to Production (4) Graded only. Traditional camera, sound, and lighting techniques in production are taught, nonlinear editing is introduced, and key theoretical, historical and aesthetic approaches to video art are surveyed.

 

ARTF 268 Introduction to Fibers: Structures (4) Students develop skills and cultivate conceptual concerns pertaining to structural textile construction. Introduces historical and contemporary work through slides and lectures. Prereq: ART 115, 116, 233

 

ARTF 269 Introduction to Fibers: Surfaces (4) Students develop skills and cultivate conceptual concerns pertaining to embellished or manipulated surfaces of textile forms. Introduces historical and contemporary work through slides and lectures. Prereq: ART 115, 116, 233

 

ARTF 368 Textile Printing (4R) Introduction to screen printing process for fabric and alternative substrates. Textile history, the relevance of printing, and related ideas of decoration, repetition, and appropriation are explored. Prereq: ARTF 253, 268, or 269 R mastery of subject

 

ARTF 369 Woven Structures (4R) Introduction to floor loom hand weaving. Traditional and experimental use of materials, techniques, and structures are used to understand weaving as a cross-disciplinary practice. Prereq: ARTF 253, 268, or 269 R mastery of subject

 

(Course previously taught as 410 in 200802)

ARTP 481 Adv Painting Practice (4R) This course allows the student to pursue individual creative practice and to form the critical intelligence necessary to develop as an artist. Sequence: ARTP 281, 381, 390 Prereq: 2 terms ARTP 390 R mastery of subject

 

WITHDRAWN PROPOSALS

 

 

DROPPED COURSES

The University Senate agreed in 1998 that the report of the Committee on Courses should include those permanently

numbered courses that are being dropped because (1) they have not been taught for three or more years, and (2) the

department can provide no reasonable explanation why they have not been taught or whether they will be in the

future. The faculty requires that general education–satisfying courses be offered each year. Other courses should be

offered at least every other year to avoid misrepresentation of course offerings to prospective students, and ensure

that required courses are readily available to current students.

 

Courses may be reinstated within a period of three years, conditional upon the following: (a) there has been no change made to the course, (b) the department provides the term the course will be taught, (c) the department provides the name of the faculty member who will be responsible for teaching, and (d) the department provides a course syllabus with information regarding undergraduate, graduate differential for demonstrating mastery if the course is numbered 4xx/5xx.

 

By action of the Committee on Courses, the following courses are removed from the curriculum:

 

Anthropology

 

 

ANTH

325

Americas: Indig Persp

last offered: 200503

ANTH

412

Economy & Culture

last offered: 200404

ANTH

430

Balkan Soc & Folklore

last offered: 200401

ANTH

433

Native Centr Americans

last offered: 200404

ANTH

439

Feminism & Ethnography

last offered: 200503

ANTH

469

Persp Health & Illness

last offered: 200502

ANTH

511

Pol, Ethn, Nationalism

last offered: 200501

ANTH

512

Economy & Culture

last offered: 200404

ANTH

530

Balkan Soc & Folklore

last offered: 200401

ANTH

539

Feminism & Ethnography

last offered: 200503

ANTH

569

Persp Health & Illness

last offered: 200502

ANTH

692

Dental Morph & Hum Evo

last offered: 200501

 

 

 

 

Architecture

 

 

ARCH

434

Vernacular Building

last offered: 200502

ARCH

494

Passive Cooling

last offered: 200403

ARCH

497

Sustainable Design

last offered: 200503

ARCH

534

Vernacular Building

last offered: 200502

ARCH

594

Passive Cooling

last offered: 200403

ARCH

597

Sustainable Design

last offered: 200503

 

 

 

 

Art

 

 

 

ART

381

Letterpress

last offered: 200503

ART

493

Visual Continuity

last offered: 200503

ART

593

Visual Continuity

last offered: 200503

ARTD

235

Drawing for Media

last offered: 200501

 

 

 

 

Art History

 

 

ARH

386

Chinese Art III

last offered: 200502

ARH

394

Japanese Art I

last offered: 200502

ARH

422

Aegean Art

last offered: 200502

ARH

423

Archaic Greek Art

last offered: 200503

ARH

451

Romanticism

last offered: 200501

ARH

522

Aegean Art

last offered: 200502

ARH

523

Archaic Greek Art

last offered: 200503

ARH

551

Romanticism

last offered: 200501

 

 

 

 

Biology

 

 

 

BI

453

Marine Molec Physiol

last offered: 200501

BI

553

Marine Molec Physiol

last offered: 200501

 

 

 

 

Chinese

 

 

 

CHN

461

Confucian Canon

last offered: 200501

CHN

561

Confucian Canon

last offered: 200501

 

 

 

 

Counseling Psychology

 

CPSY

652

Adv Ch-Fam Interven

last offered: 200502

CPSY

653

Adv Comm-Prev Interv

last offered: 200503

 

 

 

 

Conflict and Dispute Resolution

 

CRES

631

Research Methodology

last offered: 200503

 

 

 

 

Creative Writing

 

 

CRWR

244

Intro: Lit Nonfiction

last offered: 200504

 

 

 

 

Educational Leadership

 

EDLD

619

Adult Learning

last offered: 200501

EDLD

653

Data Analy & Interp

last offered: 200504

EDLD

654

Info Mgmt & Decis-Mak

last offered: 200503

 

 

 

 

English

 

 

 

ENG

414

Clas & Mediev Lit Theo

last offered: 200502

ENG

437

Medieval and Tudor Drama

last offered 200401

ENG

514

Clas & Mediev Lit Theo

last offered: 200502

ENG

537

Medieval and Tudor Drama

last offered 200201

 

 

 

 

Ethnic Studies

 

 

ES

330

Women of Color: Issues

last offered: 200503

 

 

 

 

French

 

 

 

FR

363

Economique moderne

last offered: 200503

 

 

 

 

Geography

 

 

GEOG

422

Adv Geomorph: Topic

last offered: 200502

GEOG

522

Adv Geomorph: Topic

last offered: 200502

 

 

 

 

Geology

 

 

 

GEOL

325

Geophysics

last offered: 200503

GEOL

460

Crustal Deformation

last offered: 200501

GEOL

461

Proj Crustal Deform

last offered: 200501

GEOL

464

Envir Field Geophysics

last offered: 200503

GEOL

560

Crustal Deformation

last offered: 200501

GEOL

561

Proj Crustal Deform

last offered: 200501

 

 

 

 

Human Phsyiology

 

HPHY

667

Musculoske Adap Stress

last offered: NO BANNER RECORD FOUND!

 

 

 

 

Humanities

 

 

HUM

210

Cultur/Soc Hum: Topic

last offered: 200502

 

 

 

 

Italian

 

 

 

ITAL

461

Vico & the Settecento

last offered: 200501

ITAL

561

Vico & the Settecento

last offered: 200501

 

 

 

 

Japanese

 

 

JPN

438

Classic Jpn Lit Lang

last offered: 199902

JPN

439

Adv Read Clas Jpn: Top

last offered: 199803

JPN

440

Jpn Phonol & Morphol

last offered: 200502

JPN

444

Teaching Japanese II

last offered: 200502

JPN

453

Japanese Sociolinguist

last offered: 200503

JPN

538

Classic Jpn Lit Lang

last offered: 199902

JPN

539

Adv Rd Clas Jpn: Topic

last offered: 199803

JPN

540

Jpn Phonol & Morphol

last offered: 200502

JPN

544

Teaching Japanese II

last offered: 200502

JPN

553

Japanese Sociolinguist

last offered: 200503

 

 

 

 

Law

 

 

 

LAW

624

Intensive Writing

last offered: NO BANNER RECORD FOUND!

LAW

630

Consumer Law

last offered: 200305

LAW

632

Corporate Finance

last offered: 200406

LAW

638

Trusts & Estates II

last offered: 200405

LAW

653

Mediation & Negotiat

last offered: 200006

LAW

658

Local Government Law

last offered: 200507

LAW

662

Jurisprudence

last offered: 200406

LAW

670

Public Land Law

last offered: 200405

LAW

674

Trade & Unfair Compet

last offered: 200505

LAW

676

Environment & Energy

last offered: 199105

LAW

677

Law of the Sea

last offered: 200305

LAW

679

Ocean & Coastal Law

last offered: 200405

 

 

 

 

Linguistics

 

 

LING

315

Lang & Categorization

last offered: NO BANNER RECORD FOUND!

 

 

 

 

Mathematics

 

 

MATH

455

Mathematical Modeling

last offered: 200503

MATH

555

Mathematical Modeling

last offered: 200503

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Middle Secondary Education

 

MSEC

631

Profess Prac II

last offered: 200502

 

 

 

 

Music

 

 

 

MUE

391

Choral Pedagogy

last offered: 200501

MUJ

280

Jazz Performance Lab

last offered: 200501

MUJ

281

Jazz Performance Lab

last offered: 200502

MUJ

282

Jazz Performance Lab

last offered: 200503

MUS

349

Am Ethn & Protest Mus

last offered: NO BANNER RECORD FOUND!

MUS

380

Film: Drama/Photo/Mus

last offered: 200504

 

 

 

 

Philosophy

 

 

PHIL

339

Intro Phil of Science

last offered: 200503

 

 

 

 

Physical Education and Recreation

 

PEF

242

Group Cycling II

last offered: NO BANNER RECORD FOUND!

PEF

320

Weight Management

last offered: 200503

 

 

 

 

Physics

 

 

 

PHYS

490

Adv Physics Lab

last offered: 200503

 

 

 

 

Planning, Public Policy and Management

 

PPPM

450

Race, Ethn, & Soc Pol

last offered: NO BANNER RECORD FOUND!

PPPM

550

Race, Ethn, & Soc Pol

last offered: NO BANNER RECORD FOUND!

PPPM

624

Plan Making

last offered: 200502

 

 

 

 

Political Science

 

 

PS

230

Intro Urban Politics

last offered: 200503

PS

422

Human Rights

last offered: 200501

PS

429

Pub Opin & Foreign Pol

last offered: 200503

PS

450

Ethics, Tech, & Gender

last offered: 199103

PS

454

Japanese Politics

last offered: 200502

PS

455

Theories Intl Politics

last offered: 200503

PS

459

US-China Relations

last offered: 200503

PS

497

Environmental Politics

last offered: 200503

PS

522

Human Rights

last offered: 200501

PS

529

Pub Opin & Foreign Pol

last offered: 200503

PS

550

Ethics, Tech, & Gender

last offered: 199103

PS

554

Japanese Politics

last offered: 200502

PS

555

Theories Intl Politics

last offered: 200503

PS

559

US-China Relations

last offered: 200503

PS

597

Environmental Politics

last offered: 200503

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Russian

 

 

 

RUSS

304

Doing Business in Russ

last offered: 200504

RUSS

411

Russ Hist & Lit: Topic

last offered: 200503

RUSS

444

Slavic Ling: Topic

last offered: 200502

RUSS

511

Russ Hist & Lit: Topic

last offered: 200503

RUSS

544

Slavic Ling: Topic

last offered: 200502

 

 

 

 

School Psychology

 

SPSY

682

Behavioral Consultant

last offered: 200503

 

 

 

 

Sociology

 

 

SOC

556

Feminist Theory

last offered: 200502

 

 

 

 

Spanish

 

 

 

SPAN

438

Span Romantic Poetry

last offered: 200502

SPAN

536

Contemp Mex Lit: Topic

last offered: 200501

SPAN

666

Golden Age Cul Stu

last offered: 200501

 

 

 

 

Women's and Gender Studies

 

WGS

421

Sexuality: Topic

last offered: 200504

WGS

521

Sexuality: Topic

last offered: 200402


 

SUBMITTING COURSE PROPOSALS

The Committee on Courses offers the following reminders:

 

ü      Proposals to the Committee on Courses must be submitted on electronic forms, available on the CAS website, http://uocurriculum.uoregon.edu/. Arrangements for access may be made by contacting the appropriate college curriculum coordinator for each individual professional school or college. Proposals submitted on old forms will be returned, without review, to academic departments, schools, or colleges. Proposals must be submitted to the Committee on Courses prior to the beginning of the term in which they are to be considered. Proposals received after the beginning of the term will be deferred to the following term. All departments should consult their college curriculum coordinator for deadline dates or go to http://uocurriculum.uoregon.edu/ and click the “Important Dates” link.

ü     The following minor course changes may be made without review by the full committee: minor edits of course description, pre- or co-requisites, grading option, and conditions of repeatability. Changes may be submitted in writing directly to the Offices of the Registrar and Creative Publishing, in care of Mike Jefferis (jefferis@uoregon.edu) and Scott Skelton (sskelton@darkwing.uoregon.edu), respectively. The memorandum should indicate the effective term for the change(s). Note: extensive changes may be referred to the UOCC for review.

ü     If there is any possibility that a proposed new or changed course might duplicate coverage in an existing course from another department or school, the proposing department must gain written confirmation that the other department has been consulted and does not object to the new or changed course.

ü     Proposals for new courses must be accompanied by full syllabi.

ü     For 4xx/5xx level courses, both proposal forms and syllabi must state explicitly the substantive and measurable differences in type and amount of work for the two levels.

ü     The minimal requirements for general-education status of a course are regarded as necessary, but not always sufficient, for inclusion of a course as part of a comprehensive general-education program at the university.

Group satisfying courses are intended to provide students with a cohesive general-education program. Proposals for group-satisfying status of a course should explain how the course enhances general-education at the university, explicitly stating how the course would complement other group-satisfying courses, and which other courses would be especially suitable for students to take in accompaniment. Approved March 10, 2004.

According to University Senate legislation, courses submitted for group-satisfying status must be submitted to the Intercollege General-education Review Committee.

Proposals for undergraduate group-satisfying and multicultural courses must include written justification, regardless of whether they are new or existing courses.

ü     The minimal requirements for multicultural status of a course are regarded as sufficient for inclusion of a course as part of the multicultural course requirements.

Any course that might appear to satisfy the university multicultural requirements, either by title, description, or content, is carefully examined to see if it should be listed as a multicultural course. If a course might appear on its face eligible for multicultural status, the committee needs clear explanation of why the course does—or does not—satisfy multicultural course guidelines. Arbitrary exclusion of courses from the list of multicultural satisfying courses can engender student confusion or cynicism. Approved on March 10, 2004.

As part of general-education, offerings of multicultural courses at the 100, 200, and 300 levels need to be available to a wide spectrum of students from all across the University. Departments wishing to offer courses to satisfy the multicultural requirement should make these courses available at the more general 100, 200, or 300 levels whenever possible, rather than at the more specialized 400 level.

ü     The UO Committee on Courses has established the policy that the phrase “or instructor’s consent” will not be stated along with any other course prerequisites. The prerequisites of any course may be overridden by instructor’s consent, and need not be stated explicitly for individual courses. Academic departments are able to override any prerequisite requirements in Banner should a student qualify to enroll.

“Instructor’s consent” is reserved for use alone as a sole prerequisite to allow departments to monitor suitability of enrollment in courses for individual students, preventing enrollment without prior approval. Academic departments should be aware they must code the courses correctly and assume enrollment management responsibilities, preauthorizing each student individually, with this option. Approved March 10, 2004.


CONTENTS OF COURSE SYLLABUS

 

As the primary, commonly available summary of a course, the syllabus serves several purposes. It outlines the course, it denotes what students may expect from the course, and it locates the course in the curriculum. The syllabus is the best, most concise description of a course by its teacher available to both prospective students and colleagues. The Committee on Courses uses syllabuses in its review of courses. To maximize the usefulness of a syllabus to students and faculty, it should contain the following contents:

 

1. Course Number

2. Title

3. Credits

4. Term, place, time, instructor

(For a new course proposal, indicate when it is likely to be offered, and how frequently)

(For a new course proposal, indicate who is likely to teach the course)

 

5. Position in the curriculum

• Satisfies group requirement? Explain why

• Satisfies multicultural requirement? Explain why

• Satisfies other general-education requirement?

• Satisfies other major or program requirement?

• Preparatory for other courses?

• List prerequisites or other suggested preparation

 

6. Format (lecture, discussion, laboratory)

 

7. Outline of subject and topics explored

 

8. Course materials (texts, books, readings)

 

9. Instructor expectations of students

• Be explicit (by pages assigned, lengths of assignments)

• Level of student engagement expected (see suggested Student Engagement Inventory on following page)

• Readings

• Problems

• Attendance

• Project

• Writing

• Laboratory

• Field work

• Work with electronic media, network, online

• Performance

• Presentation

• Exams

• Differential expected for graduate work for joint 4xx/5xx-level courses

 

10. Assessment

• Methods (testing, homework)

• Times or frequency

• Grading policy

• Incomplete policy

 

[See Faculty Handbook for other recommendations regarding university policies.]


 

STUDENT ENGAGEMENT INVENTORY

To aid in assigning student credit hours uniformly to courses in the curriculum, the committee inventories the amount of student engagement in a course. The committee has found the following tool to be useful. Departments preparing course proposals are invited to use this form when deciding how many SCH units to request for a proposed course. Departments are encouraged to report to the committee how this tool may be improved for their use.

 

Undergraduate Courses

Under the UO quarter system, each undergraduate credit reflects approximately thirty hours of student engagement. Therefore, a 3-credit course would engage students for approximately 90 hours total among the activities listed below, whereas a 4-credit course would entail approximately 120 hours of activities in which students are actively engaged in learning over the course of the term.

Graduate Courses

Graduate students are expected to perform work of higher quality and quantity, typically with forty hours of student engagement for each student credit hour. Therefore, a 3-credit graduate course would typically engage students approximately 120 hours; a 4-credit graduate course may be expected to entail approximately 160 hours for the average student for whom the course is designed.

 

Please identify the number of hours a typical or average student would expect to spend in each of the following activities:

Educational activity

Hours student engaged

Explanatory comments (if any):

Course attendance

 

 

Assigned readings

 

 

Project

 

 

Writing assignments

 

 

Lab or workshop

 

 

Field work, experience

 

 

Online interaction

 

 

Performances, creative activities

 

 

Total hours:

 

 

 

Definition of terms:

Course attendance

Actual time student spends in class with instructor or GTF

Assigned readings

Estimated time it takes for a student with average reading ability to read all assigned readings

Writing assignments

Estimated time it takes for a student with average writing ability to produce a final, acceptable written product as required by the assignment

Project

Estimated time a student would be expected to spend creating or contributing to a project that meets course requirements (includes individual and group projects)

Lab or workshop

Actual time scheduled for any lab or workshop activities that are required but are scheduled outside of class hours

Field work, experience

Actual or estimated time a student would spend or be expected to spend engaged in required field work or other field-based activities

Online activities

Actual or estimated time a student would spend or be expected to spend engaged in online activities directly related to the course, separate from online research required for projects or writing assignments

Performance, creative activities

Actual or estimated time a student would spend or be expected to spend outside of class hours engaged in preparing for required performance or creative activity


 

SUSTAINABLE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

The 2000–2001 academic year was the first year that the Committee on Courses systematically deleted from the university catalog courses that have not been taught for three years or more.

 

In several cases, departments had not offered a specialized course under a course number and title specified in the catalog. Yet similar courses had been taught regularly in the department in various formats, under experimental numbers (410, 510, 610), or under the general designations for special topics seminars, workshops, or practicums (the 406/407/408/409, 506/507/508/509, 606/607/608/609 series). With time, departments had discovered that a course description in the catalog was too specialized to apply to any of their courses as actually being taught.

 

Unfortunately, removal of an overly specialized course, although untaught, still might have consequences for departments. Often that course had been the sole representative in the catalog of subjects that are taught by a department and are part of the regular curriculum. Dropping that course could make it appear that a department offered no courses in that course’s subject area.

 

The committee has noted another, companion problem. Over the years, the committee has observed that new courses tailored to the particular research interests and instructional style of an individual faculty member are likely to fall into disuse within a few years as the person’s teaching assignments and interests change, or if the instructor becomes unavailable for teaching that particular course.

 

The Committee on Courses recommends that departments and programs develop more sustainable course descriptions. A sustainable course description would identify a subject area and general approach, but would not be so restrictive as to exclude different perspectives or specializations also representative of that subject area.

 

The committee also recommends that departments and programs be selective when proposing permanent course status for specialized courses that can only be taught by one particular instructor.

 

For example, a department with several experts qualified to teach ceramics, but having only one instructor who specializes in Ming porcelain per se, might currently have a specialized course titled Ming Dynasty Porcelains in the catalog. A more sustainable course title could be Chinese Porcelains or even Porcelains, depending upon the range of expertise available to teach the course. Another approach would use the topics course Ceramics, possibly repeatable as the exact subject material—and transcript title—changes.

 

Departments following these recommendations could then represent the full range of their curricular offerings and could maintain a sustainable list of courses in the catalog.

 

 

CRITERIA FOR ADDING AN “H” SUFFIX TO A COURSE NUMBER

 

The Committee on Courses has discussed the criteria for adding an “H” suffix to a course number and recommends the following:

 

The “H” suffix is intended to advise students that a course provides honors content of significant difficulty and requires honors effort from students. The Committee on Courses will be looking for evidence of the following in determining whether a course should hold an “H” suffix designation:

 

1.   Students enrolling should have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.30 in their major.

  1. The content of the class, and the level of analysis, should be significantly deeper than for non-honors classes.
  2. Class size should be small enough to promote intensive student participation.
  3. The faculty member(s) teaching the course should be available for close advising outside of class.

 


UNDERGRADUATE GENERAL-EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

GROUP-REQUIREMENT POLICIES

 

The following criterion were proposed by the Undergraduate Council and the College of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee. The University Senate approved them in May 2001 by Motion US0001-3 Replacement Motion governing the approval of courses meeting general-education requirements and the distribution of courses student must complete within each group.

 

1. Group satisfying courses in Arts and Letters, Social Science, and Science must meet the following general criteria:

1.1. Group satisfying courses in arts and letters must create meaningful opportunities for students to engage actively in the modes of inquiry that define a discipline. Proposed courses must be broad in scope and demonstrably liberal in nature (that is, courses that promote open inquiry from a variety of perspectives). Though some courses may focus on specialized subjects or approaches, there must be a substantial course content locating that subject in the broader context of the major issues of the discipline. Qualifying courses will not focus on teaching basic skills but will require the application or engagement of those skills through analysis and interpretation.

1.2. Group satisfying courses in the social sciences must be liberal in nature rather than being professionally oriented or limited to the performance of professional skills. They must cover a representative cross-section of key issues, perspectives, and modes of analysis employed by scholars working on the subject matter addressed by the course. The subject matter of the course will be relatively broad, e.g. involving more than one issue, place, or time. Courses with an emphasis on methods and skills will satisfy the requirement only if there is also a substantial and coherent theoretical component.

1.3. Group satisfying courses in the sciences should introduce students to the foundations of one or more scientific disciplines, or should provide an introduction to fundamental methods (such as mathematics) that are widely used in scientific disciplines. Courses should introduce students to the process of scientific reasoning.

 

2. Specific Criteria:

2.1. Group satisfying courses must be numbered at the 100, 200, and 300 levels.

2.2. Lower division courses must be offered annually, and upper division courses at least every other year.

2.3. Approved courses must be at least 4 credits each.

2.4. Upper division group satisfying courses must provide depth and rigor beyond that of typical lower-division general-education courses. Departments must justify, in terms of content, workload, and method of instruction, the assignment of a course to the upper level.

2.5. Courses that are offered for majors only are excluded from group status, but courses that are designed for both majors and other students may qualify.

2.6. Although laboratory courses are not automatically excluded from group status in the sciences, to acquire this status, the courses must not focus primarily on techniques or data collection.

 

3. Procedures governing the approval of all courses designed to meet General-education requirements.:

3.1. Before submission to the Senate, such courses proposed by departments must be reviewed at several levels:

3.1.1. By the curricular committees of the various colleges and schools

3.1.2. By an inter-college committee including the members of the CAS Curricular Committee and two representatives appointed by the deans of the others schools and colleges. This second committee is also charged to review such courses as do not meet the standards set in paragraph (2.) and to negotiate a solution with the sponsoring department.

3.1.3. By the University Committee on Courses.

3.2. The inter college committee is authorized to establish procedures governing the review process.

4. Completion of group requirements (student progress):

4.1. Within the full set of courses that fulfills all of the requirements, students may not count

4.1.1. more than one course that has the subject code of the major, or

4.1.2. more than three courses that have the same subject code.

4.2. Within the smaller set of courses that fulfills the requirements of each group, students must complete at least two courses that have the same subject code.

 

Extended Course Descriptions for Group Satisfying Courses: All proposals for courses that would satisfy a group requirement for general-education must include a suitable extended course description, for use with the course, as specified in senate legislation:

 

“For all group-satisfying courses to be offered during a particular term, faculty or departments are asked to post electronically, in the Schedule of Classes, course descriptions that are substantially expanded over those provided in the catalog. The posted course information should be understandable to someone unfamiliar with the field and should emphasize the questions or issues that reveal, by their breadth and significance, why the course has earned Group status.” (US03/04-8, May 12, 2004)

 

 

MULTICULTURAL-CATEGORY DEFINITIONS

 

Category A: American Cultures. The goal is to focus on race and ethnicity in the United States by considering racial and ethnic groups from historical and comparative perspectives. Five racial or ethnic groups are identified: African American, Chicano or Latino, Native American, Asian American, European American. Approved courses deal with at least two of these groups in a comparative manner. They do not necessarily deal specifically with discrimination or prejudice, although many do.

 

Category B: Identity, Pluralism, and Tolerance. The goal is to gain scholarly insight into the construction of collective identities, the emergence of representative voices from varying social and cultural standpoints, and the effects of prejudice, intolerance, and discrimination. The identities at issue may include ethnicities as in the American Cultures category, as well as classes, genders, religions, sexual orientations, or other groups whose experiences contribute to cultural pluralism. This category includes courses that analyze the general principles underlying tolerance, or the lack of it.

 

Category C: International Cultures. The goal is to study world cultures in critical perspective. Approved courses either treat an international culture in view of the issues raised in Categories A and B (namely, race and ethnicity, pluralism and monoculturalism, prejudice and tolerance) or explicitly describe and analyze a worldview (i.e., a system of knowledge, feeling, and belief) that is substantially different from those prevalent in the twentieth-century United States.

 

MULTICULTURAL REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDY ABROAD

Students who participate in University of Oregon sponsored study abroad programs can fulfill one Category C International Cultures-satisfying course through this participation in order to meet Multicultural Requirements.


The UO Foreign Study Programs Committee in collaboration with Study Abroad staff will identify which UO-sponsored programs will meet the International Cultures
requirement, based on the following criteria:

 

 


 

SUGGESTIONS FOR REVISING DEFINITIONS OF

UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS, MINORS, CERTIFICATES

MAJOR

 

Definition

Courses in designated primary subject areas or disciplines in which a student commits to gaining in-depth knowledge, skills, competence, and attitudes through a coherent pattern of courses. A footnote accompanies the major definition: Divisional major programs emphasize a general and integrated approach to learning, with the students major program broadly inclusive of work in several of the discipline or subject areas within the specific division within which the students degree program lies (i.e., humanities, social science, science). For instance, a divisional major program in the social sciences would call for the student to include within his or her major work from several of the disciplines or subject areas in the social sciences (such as sociology, political science, or economics). Because of the breadth of disciplines or subjects included in the major, the student has less opportunity to delve in depth into a single subject area such as sociology, political science, or economics, than they would be able to do were they in a “departmental major” program in a single one of these disciplines or subject areas.

 

Minimal Requirements

36 credits, of which a minimum of 24 must be upper division. Departments should consider setting minimum residency requirements.

 

MINOR

Definition

Courses in a designated secondary subject area or discipline distinct from and usually outside the student’s degree major in which knowledge is gained in a coherent pattern of courses.

 

Minimal Requirements

24 credits, of which a minimum of 12 must be upper division. Should be within a discipline that already has a preexisting major or is sponsored by a department.

CERTIFICATE

 

Definition

An approved academic award given in conjunction with the satisfactory completion of a program of instruction requiring one year or more, but less than four years, of full-time equivalent, postsecondary-level work. The conditions and conferral of the award are governed by the faculty and ratified by the governing board of the institution granting the certificate.

 

Minimal Requirements

36 credits—24 upper division with 12 minimum at 400 level. The sponsoring department must provide guidance—a template or check list and the name of an adviser, with notice that the student must consult an adviser to apply for the certificate at least two terms prior to graduation.

 

 

 

 

 


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