Oregon Center for Volcanology

RESEARCH


Modern volcanology is a multidisciplinary subject including aspects of geochemistry, petrology, geophysics, and geodynamics. The University of Oregon Volcanology group utilizes a variety of research tools including microanalytical facilities, high performance computing, experimental petrology, and isotopic analysis. Please visit the linked research profiles of our faculty to learn more about research being conducted at the University of Oregon.


Recent Research Examples:

Faculty

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Ilya Bindeman

Professor

Stable Isotope Geochemistry

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Estelle Chaussard

Assistant Professor

Geodesy

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Josef Dufek

Lillis Professor of Volcanology, Center Director

Volcanology, Geodynamics

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Thomas Giachetti

Assistant Professor

Physical Volcanology

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Emilie Hooft

Associate Professor

Geophysics

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Dana Johnston

Professor Emeritus

Experimental Petrology

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Leif Karlstrom

Assitant Professor

Volcanology, Geodynamics

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Mark Reed

Professor

Hydrothermal Systems

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Amanda Thomas

Associate Professor

Geophysics

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Doug Toomey

Professor

Geophysics

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Meredith Townsend

Lillis Assistant Professor

Rock Mechanics

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Paul Wallace

Professor

Magmatic Volatiles

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Jim Watkins

Associate Professor

Geochemistry

Graduate Students

Information for Prospective Students

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Marisa Acosta

Graduate Student

Advisor: Mark Reed & Jim Watkins

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Gui Aksit

Graduate Student

Advisor: Meredith Townsend

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Becca Bussard

Graduate Student

Advisor: Estelle Chaussard

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Monse Cascante

Graduate Student

Advisor: Thomas Giachetti

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Ana Colón

Graduate Student

Advisor: Meredith Townsend

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Lissie Conners

Graduate Student

Advisor: Paul Wallace

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Josh Crozier

Graduate Student

Advisor: Leif Karlstrom

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Annika Dechert

Graduate Student

Advisor: Josef Dufek

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Gabe Ferragut

Graduate Student

Advisor: Doug Toomey

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Rachel Hampton

Graduate Student

Advisor: Ilya Bindeman and Leif Karlstrom

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Chris Harper

Graduate Student

Advisor: Josef Dufek

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Ben Heath

Graduate Student

Advisor: Emilie Hooft

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Mike Hudak

Graduate Student

Advisor: Ilya Bindeman

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Sage Kemmerlin

Graduate Student

Advisor: Josef Dufek

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Allison Kubo

Graduate Student

Advisor: Josef Dufek and Leif Karlstrom

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Allan Lerner

Graduate Student

Advisor: Paul Wallace

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Michelle Muth

Graduate Student

Advisor: Paul Wallace

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Dan O'Hara

Graduate Student

Advisor: Leif Karlstrom

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Paul Regensburger

Graduate Student

Advisor: Josef Dufek and Carol Paty

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Kathy Trafton

Graduate Student

Advisor: Thomas Giachetti

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Josh Wiejaczka

Graduate Student

Advisor: Thomas Giachetti

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Amelia Winner

Graduate Student

Advisor: Josef Dufek

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PJ Zrelak

Graduate Student

Advisor: Josef Dufek

Postdocs and Research Scientists

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Nathan Andersen

Post Doc

Advisor: Josef Dufek

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Eric Breard

Post Doc

Advisor: Josef Dufek

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Julian McAdams

Reasearch Scientist and Machinist

With Josef Dufek

FEATURED STUDENT: Amelia Winner

  • Featured Student: Amelia WinnerAmelia is a 4th year graduate student working with Dr. Joe Dufek. She uses a combination of laboratory experiments and discrete element simulations to understand how bulk flow properties effect the shape of bed force distributions in rapid granular flows.
  • css image sliderAmelia is simulating granular flows in a rotating flume to measure forces felt at the base of these flows. The results of these experiments will provide a basis for understanding the influence of flow properties on bed force distributions and inform us about flow behavior in natural systems.
  • Fun FactsAmelia's favorite soup is potato leek, her favorite thing about UO is its proximity to the Cascades, and her favorite volcano is Mount Rainier.
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OREGON CENTER FOR VOLCANOLOGY

NEWS


ALUMNI PROFILE

Diana Roman, PhD. 2004

Dr. Roman is currently a staff scientist at the Carnegie Institute of Washingion specializing in volcano seismology.
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How did you get started in the field the volcanology?

My first degree in applied economics is from Cornell and after undergrad, I worked in investment banking. This was during the “.com” era in the late 90’s. I worked in San Francisco and I started a company with a couple of other Cornell computer scientists. So I have a very unusual background. Volcanology showed up in my final year of college. I had a friend from another school who was a geology major and she thought I would like it - and I became completely hooked. Ultimately I decided to go grad school. I was really excited when I admitted into the University of Oregon.

What was your graduate research?

I did both my masters and my PhD at the University of Oregon. I ended up doing a masters first where I was looking at the petrology of the 1986 eruption of Augustine in Alaska. One of the questions we were trying to address is why it produces a whole range of compositions from basaltic andesite to dacite. I did a lot of work examining storage conditions using thermobarometry and melt inclusion work. My PhD work, which is still very much something I do today, was looking at stress field changes, how these changes produce magma movement, and how that is encoded in the source mechanisms of high frequency earthquakes. We looked at how those changes were something we could detect and use as a monitoring tool - and how this seismicity differs between dry magmas and wet magmas. The crowning surprise of my PhD was that we found a compositional difference in how the seismicity is produced, which I think is one of the first links between volcanic seismicity and the physical properties of magma.

What is been your favorite experience you've had during the research?

You're going to make me pick one? [laughs] Watching my advisees have successes, honestly. The hardest and most rewarding part is advising. Watching my current students either master new techniques, finding a new result, publishing a paper, or getting a job interview. It is really fun to watch people I've helped train to have wins. And the field stuff is very cool too! There was a day a couple years ago, when I was on a boat in the harbor in the Aleutians, and everybody had left in the helicopter so I had the boat to myself. It was just glassy sea everywhere and there was this little otter just splashing around and the sun was shining. I thought, “I can't get believe I get paid to do this”.

What do you think is the best part about being a volcanologist?

The type of volcanology I do is fundamental research but towards an end. I really like it when I can do something that translates into a new tool or new understanding that people who are tasked with monitoring can use. Some of the things I do can be very academic and interesting and more removed from that. The thing I like about volcanology is that you have the opportunity to contribute to solving a real problem from a very free and wide-open space. There are now a few observatories that are adopting tools for analyses that I have developed and are incorporated in their formal monitoring protocols - and that’s cool.

OREGON CENTER FOR VOLCANOLOGY


University of Oregon Cluster of Excellence

The Earth Sciences Department has long enjoyed an international reputation for strength in studies of high-temperature geological processes, dating to at least 1965 when the original Center for Volcanology was established by emeritus faculty AR McBirney, DW Weill and GG Goles (see brochure below, circa 1968). The 60’s, 70’s and 80’s saw many landmark studies published by department faculty and graduate students on a variety of topics including characterization of the lunar samples returned by the Apollo missions; experimental studies of lava rheology, phase equilibria, and trace element partitioning; and field and analytical investigations of layered mafic intrusions, oceanic archipelagos, subduction-related volcanoes, ore deposits, and metamorphic terranes. Recently our group was selected as a Cluster of Excellence by the University Oregon that has led to an expansion of the volcanology group. Our current faculty continue the tradition of petrological and volcanological research while also expanding into the realms of geochemistry, geophysics, and high performance computing. While our interests are diverse, we share a focus on active volcanic, magmatic, hydrothermal, and process-oriented investigations.

2019-2020

VOLCANOLOGY SEMINAR


Unless otherwise announced Volcanology Seminars will occur in the Visualization Lab in the Science Library at noon.

Oct. 1: Colin Wilson, Victoria University (Special Time: 12:30)

Oct. 3 (Special Seminar in Cascade 200): Tony Irving, University of Washington

Oct. 8: CIDER Video

Oct. 15: Alison Graettinger, University of Missouri

Oct. 22: Adam Kent, Oregon State University

Oct. 29: Tom Sisson, USGS

Nov. 5: Mary Benage, USGS

Nov. 12: TBA

Nov. 19: Martin Streck, Portland State University